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Sep 25, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Gays

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
A female burglar

A female burglar has just been caged in Indiana, whose ingenuity and daring would be worthy of admiration were they exercised in a different field of labor. Her name is Nellie Spencer, and she is reported to have had under her command as desperate a gang of thieves as ever flourished. The latest operations of her gang were undertaken in Evansville, where Nellie was so unlucky as to be caught.

She is described as a young woman and wears a determined look upon her face. She is of good large figure, and her movements are extremely graceful. Her eyes are coal black, and a winning smile plays about her mouth. She wears her hair short and curly, combed back from her forehead, and she has a very pretty way of throwing it back by a dash of her hand.

She is no ordinary woman, and has little of the timidity which characterizes her sex. She has discarded the garments of her sex with all other feminine attributes and donned the clothing of the sterner sex, while carrying out her plans.

Her gang would usually meet at 2 o'clock in the morning. The party assigned for the work of burglary would be assisted by one person to hold the swag, while the others would be posted around to give warning. The signals were various, sometimes a gentle rap on the fence, and again a low whistle.

When anyone approached, the party lay low until he passed, and the business was again resumed. No one person was selected to do the burglary, the risky work being divided between the members of the gang. Frequently however, Nellie is said to have accomplished a neat job single handed. Her valise was found where she boarded and among its contents were two suits of men's clothes.
 

Subjects: Barber / Hair, Crime, Criminals, Eye, Gangs, Gays, Luck, Masculinity (Machismo), Prisons, Robbers and Outlaws, Work, Clothing

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Foreign

Foreign gossip says, the young Marquis of Lorne has a forlorn time of it among his royal wife's relatives. The young princes snub him as a subject, and his German brother-in-law, the heir to the Kaiser's crown, does likewise. On a recent visit to this prince, while his wife was admitted to the imperial circle of Berlin, poor Lorne was "left to cool his heels among the nobility outside"; and at a recent garden party in London, he was peremptorily directed by an equerry of his brother-in-law, the heir apparent, to leave the royal tent, which he had entered without special invitation.



[See John Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll, in Wikipedia]
 

Subjects: English (and England), Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Gays, Germans, Parties, Rich People, Royalty, Women, Europe, Canada

Posted by stew - Sun, Jul 2, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 15, 1875
A woman who had served in the army for 38 years, beginning at the age of 14, becoming a commissioned officer, was lately detected at a hospital in Paris. She was twice severely wounded at Wtaerloo, a

A woman who had served in the army for 38 years, beginning at the age of 14, becoming a commissioned officer, was lately detected at a hospital in Paris. She was twice severely wounded at Wtaerloo, and has letters of congratulation on her valorous deeds from Marshals Berthier, Augerman, Suchet and http://www.larouchep...3213napol_spain.html General Dupont . During all this time she managed to conceal her sex. She is now 80 years old, and since 1833 [?] has been pensioned.
 

Subjects: Economics, French, Gays, Literature / Web Pages, Medicine / Hospitals, War / Weaponry, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 6, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 4, 1875
The light of the Spanish Republic was put out Thurs., as quietly and apparently as effectually as one would sniff a candle. The movement which for some time has been silently working in favor of Prin

The light of the Spanish Republic was put out Thurs., as quietly and apparently as effectually as one would sniff a candle. The movement which for some time has been silently working in favor of Prince Alfonso was suddenly brought to the surface, and the 17 year old son of the ex Queen Isabella was proclaimed King [becoming http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_XII_of_Spain King Alfonso XII ], and as quickly acknowledged as such by ministry, army and navy, and if the reports be true, very generally by the people. The ships in the harbor of Santander have hoisted the royal flag, and the armies of the north and center have invited the new King to visit them. Marshal Serrano, president of the republic, acquiesces in the movement. [It is rumored that http://en.wikipedia...._Serrano_y_Dominguez Francisco Serrano y Dominguez was the true father of King Alfonso, since his mother was married to her gay cousin at the time of his conception].
 

Subjects: Births, Charlemont (MA), Family, Gays, Light, Marriage and Elopement, Politics, Royalty, Transportation, War / Weaponry, Women, Europe

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 31, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 4, 1875
Flirting

Flirting - It is not very difficult to find reasons why flirts do not marry. Sensible men admire in a woman something besides a pretty face and engaging manners. They love intellect, common sense, and heart qualifications, which the flirt does not possess. The true woman allows her affections full play and is not ashamed of them. She will not lead a man to believe she cares for him when she does no such thing; she will not flirt just for the sake of flirting. She has a true conception of what is right, and possesses a great deal more common sense. She has derived her education from something more than three volume novels and the society of the empty pated. She may attract less attention in the drawing room than a flirt does, becuase she is less noisy and obtruse; but for all that, she will be married sooner, and make her husband a truer and better wife. A true woman does not care for the spoony young man. She dislikes his foppishness, the vapid compliments he pays her, and his effeminacy. He quickly finds this out and leaves her in peace, and usually marries a flirt.
 

Subjects: Courtship, Education, Gays, Households, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Masculinity (Machismo), Noise, Women

Posted by stew - Sat, Sep 4, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 14, 1874
A fop in company, wanting his servant, called out "Where is that blockhead of mine"? "On your shoulders sir" said a lady.

A fop in company, wanting his servant, called out "Where is that blockhead of mine"? "On your shoulders sir" said a lady.
 

Subjects: Fashion, Gays, Jokes, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 23, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 20, 1874
Miss Anne Whitney of Boston has finished her clay model of the statue of Samuel Ada

Miss http://www.glbtq.com/arts/whitney_a.html Anne Whitney of Boston has finished her clay model of the statue of http://home.maine.rr.com/firstmtnforest/page16.htm Samuel Adams , to be placed with a figure of Governor Winthrop in the statue hall at Washington [in the Capitol] as the contribution of Massachusetts.
 

Subjects: Art, Boston (MA), Gays, Government, Massachusetts, Statues, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 12, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 5, 1872
A woman 20 years a man

A woman 20 years a man - The Scotch papers bring us the romantic story of a woman who dressed, lived and labored for 20 years as a man, marrying during the time another woman as wife, and all the while, too, having a great proclivity for falling in love with pretty girls and getting up desperate flirtations with them. She was known as "Johnnie" Campbell, worked at the blacksmith business, was very handy in labor, intelligent, obliging and popular. Her secret came out by reason of her having the small pox, and being obliged to go to the hospital for treatment; and now that she has got well, she has been apprehended and is in jail on the charge of pretending to be a man when she wasn’t. No great harm seems to have been done to anybody by her sin, and it is to be hoped that the law will not insist on being cruel for the sake of revenge that nobody demands, or a warning that is not needed. We quote some particulars from her case from the detailed account: At all times Campbell would make herself so handy in household matters, and especially in sewing and mending the fellow lodgers’ clothes, that she gained the affection of all around her. When Mrs. Early was sick on one occasion, Campbell was so obliging in her conduct to the sick woman that some of the neighbors, who only knew her as "Johnnie" were kind enough to circulate very unkind stories, which caused the husband to issue the instructions for "Johnnie" to leave. This had almost come to pass when the secret of Johnnie’s sex oozed out. Campbell’s explanation of her extraordinary procedure is, that in consequence of bad usage when she was about 13 years of age, she left her parent’s home to shift for herself. Some time afterward her brother, when he was dying, sent for her and requested her to take his clothes and wear them, as that would probably enable her to make her way in the world. She complied, and as the garments wore out she renewed them, and became so accustomed to the garb that habit became a second nature.
 

Subjects: Child Abuse, Diseases, Family, Gays, Households, Law and Lawyers, Marriage and Elopement, Masculinity (Machismo), Prisons, Sex Crimes, Women, Work, Scots and Scotland

Posted by stew - Thu, Jan 8, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 1, 1874
A young man kept at the A young man kept at the http://www.us-census...cot1930-T626-836.htm Bangor City Farm , labors under the curious hallucination that he is a woman, and appropriates and wears all the shawls and millinery he can lay hands on.
 

Subjects: Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fashion, Gays, Poor, Women

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 25, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 4, 1870
Young men in New York of the Young men in New York of the Augustus Adolphus school [I believe this should be http://search.famsf.org/4d.acgi$Record?25671&=list&=1&=&=And&=1347&=0&=keywords&=Yes&=&=&=17%20&=Yes&=&=f Gustavus Adolphus , who was a Prince of Finland, Duke of Estonia, and King of Sweden in the 17th century, who was a great proponent of Protestantism, and wanted to colonize New York, but was killed first] part their hair in the middle and wear bracelets on their arms.
 

Subjects: Barber / Hair, Gays, Royalty, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 2, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 16, 1870
Susan Anthony declares she won't pay taxes; she will go to jail first, as Susan Anthony declares she won't pay taxes; she will go to jail first, as http://memory.loc.go...mem/consrvbib:@field(SUBJ+@band(Thoreau,+Henry+David,--1817-1862+)) Thoreau did. Besides, she hasn't any property - just the new silk dress http://www.boundless...atures/a0000170.html Anna Dickinson gave her
 

Subjects: Fashion, Gays, Government, Literature / Web Pages, Prisons, Women, Clothing

Posted by stew - Sun, Nov 30, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 19, 1872
A woman named Fanny Taylor, who instead of talking of her rights, claimed them, has had a career. She began from running away from her home in Pennsylvania with a circus, with which she roamed for se

A woman named Fanny Taylor, who instead of talking of her rights, claimed them, has had a career. She began from running away from her home in Pennsylvania with a circus, with which she roamed for several years as a gymnast and female athlete. Afterward she learned the shoemaker's trade, and passing as a man, served 5 years in that business. Then she turned blacksmith, and served as regimental blacksmith in the tenth Missouri Cavalry, was taken prisoner and sent to Richmond, where she was released on revealing her sex. She has since been arrested many times for fighting and gambling; has won a prize fight; run on the Missouri Pacific railroad as a brakeman, and at last married a negro and became a besotted drunkard, and habitual inmate of the calaboose in Kansas City.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Business Enterprises, Circus, Contests, Drunkenness, Gambling, Gays, Masculinity (Machismo), Missing Persons, Police, Prisons, Sports, Trains, War / Weaponry, Women, Work, Clothing

Posted by stew - Sun, Nov 16, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 6, 1874
There's Something Wrong (poem)

There’s Something Wrong (poem) - When I find a money monger/ With his hoarded piles of pelf/ Eagerly, with wolfish hunger/ Seeking gold and loving self/ Somehow I have got a notion/ That I’ve cherished well and strong/ He is not a growing better/ There’s about him something wrong!/ When I see a foppish fellow/ Dandy dressed from head to feet/ With an air of self importance/ Bragging o’er some wondrous feat/ Using slang to spice his speeches/ Mingling with the vulgar throng/ Quickly comes the same suggestion/ There’s about him something wrong/ When I meet with idle persons/ Able-bodied, day by day/ Living for no special purpose/ but to pass the time away/ God’s command to six days labor/ Heeding not, though hale and strong/ I think, indeed I feel quite certain/ There’s about them something wrong!/ When I see that men of talent/ Men of influence, ample wealth/ Traffic in that worse than useless/ Injuring morals, parse and health/ Those who should be first and foremost/ Piloting our youth along/ O’er the pitfalls and the breakers/ Then I know there’s something wrong!(by Q in a Corner, Poet’s Seat, Shady Lane).
 

Subjects: Economics, Fashion, Gays, Masculinity (Machismo), Poetry, Religion, Women, Words, Work

Posted by stew - Thu, Oct 2, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Saturday, May 3, 1873
The dog of the Governor of Minnesota recently gave offense to Miss Anna Dickinson, while delivering her lecture in St. Paul, an

The dog of the Governor of Minnesota recently gave offense to http://gorp.away.com...pruett/co_longs3.htm Miss Anna Dickinson , while delivering her lecture in St. Paul, and in response to her request that some one would please her by removing the animal from the hall, the owner gravely arose, conducted his dog to an ante-room, and resumed his former position as a listener.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Gays, Government, Show Business

Posted by stew - Tue, Sep 23, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, December 19, 1870
"No man dares to call me his own" triumphantly declared Miss Susan B. Anthony [ "No man dares to call me his own" triumphantly declared Miss http://www.atheists.org/Atheism/roots/anthony/ Susan B. Anthony [ http://www.infidels....cabe/dictionary.html Susan Brownell Anthony] at the Woman's Suffrage Convention in http://www.mith2.umd.../75-suffragists.html Cincinnati .
 

Subjects: Gays, Suffrage, Women

Posted by stew - Thu, Sep 18, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 23, 1871
Anna Dickinson's lecture income last season was $19,000, according to a gossiping New York paper, but will be considerably less the

http://www.hypatiama...oween/hal_page2.html Anna Dickinson 's lecture income last season was $19,000, according to a gossiping New York paper, but will be considerably less the present season. She has averaged $10,000 for 7 years past.
 

Subjects: Economics, Gays, Literature / Web Pages, Rich People, Show Business, Women

Posted by stew - Wed, Sep 17, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 9, 1870
Anna Dickinson on women

http://www.amazingdr...ing.com/hlchap8.html Anna Dickinson on women - God did not create women as a violet to smell sweet, or as a lute to send forth harmonies, but as an immortal soul owing duties to every other immortal soul...No good will come to man or woman by keeping them asunder. There is no work a man can do but will be better done by having a woman at his side
 

Subjects: Gays, Music, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Tue, Sep 16, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 21, 1870
A Mrs. Wolf resided in Williamsport, Penn. until last week, when she persuaded her husband to sell the household goods & prepare to go to the countr

A Mrs. Wolf resided in http://www.citybus.org/history1.html Williamsport, Penn. until last week, when she persuaded her husband to sell the household goods & prepare to go to the country with her to spend the remainder of the winter with her relatives. After he gave her the proceeds of the sale, Mrs. Wolf coolly told her husband that she was tired of him and left for parts unknown with - another female
 

Subjects: Gays, Households, Marriage and Elopement, Sales, Women

Posted by stew - Tue, Jul 22, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 2, 1874
(Shelburne Falls) Charles E. White, who is so favorably known to our long haired friends will soon move to Chicopee, where he will open a millinery store.

(Shelburne Falls) Charles E. White, who is so favorably known to our long haired friends will soon move to Chicopee, where he will open a millinery store.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Emigration and Immigration, Fashion, Gays, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Jun 29, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 27, 1873
Our Village [Shelburne Falls]

Our Village [Shelburne Falls] - Our village is a narrow vale/ Through which flow Deerfield's waters/ While Prospect Peak and Shelburne hills/ O'erlook our cosy [i.e. cozy] quarters/ Across this restless, rippling stream/ An iron bridge's extended/ A good one, too, or ought to be/ For much has been expended./ Along its banks, on either side/ Are seen the varied dwellings/ Of those who came here to reside/ Of different trades and callings./ They're mostly built of wood, and white/ With here and there a brick one/ A few, a Very few you'll find/ Present a front of stone./ Some less than thirty hundred souls/ This village does contain/ Some hail from Britain's rock-reefed shore/ And some from Holland came/ We like the frank and honest face/ Of the stout, jolly Dutchman [i.e. German]/ But oh! Such names, e'en could we spell/ Twould choke us to pronounce them./ A few old residents remain/ Our village pioneers/ Who brought their all from earlier homes/ And came to settle here;/ There's Uncle "Pop" and Uncle "Jar"/ And Ralph who married Amy/ Squire Barnard too, and Uncle Charles/ Bereaved of his Lucinda./ Our churches have a Sunday look/ Their spire point up to Heaven/ And scores of well-dressed worshippers/ Meet one day out of seven/ And Dr. Grey - God bless the man -/ Assays the heart to reach/ Is dignified, subdued, and calm/ As all should be who preach./ Across the way, in thrilling tones/ The Lamb's meek bleat is heard/ And souls impressed by truths divine/ From lowest depths are stirred/ Two others, earnest, godly men/ Attempt to point the way;/ They're Brothers Stevenson and Fenn/ God grant success, we pray/ Of Doctors, there's a full supply/ Their skill we've never tested/ But if it with their charges vie/ Disease will soon be ousted/ There's Wilson, Puffer and Charles E./ A Morton and a Morgan/ Enough, as you can plainly see/ To patch each failing organ/ The merchants, men of sterling worth/ Are courteous, kind, and clever/ They'll sell you goods, wait for their pay/ and never sue, no, never/ If stationery you desire/ Why, go to Mrs. Sawyer's/ If points of law you wish discussed/ Here are your petty lawyers./ There's S.T. Field, lives near the grove/ And H.M.P., Esquire/ And Arthur too - confounded bach -/ What more could you desire?/ If you should wish yourself to see/ And have your picture taken/ Just go aloft to J.K.P./ Our faith in him's unshaken./ Postmaster Bowen still performs/ His duties manfully/ He never'll wear a Greeley hat/ That's certain - no, not he/ Then Sheriff Swan, he drives the hearse/ And catches rogues, they say/ Somehow we feel somewhat inclined/ To keep out of his way./ The Lamsons make their business pay/ They run the cutlery/ But where they sell so many knives/ Is quite a mystery/ In Merrick's you can clothing find/ If it don't fit, no snarling/ Step o'er the way, my honest friend/ And call upon "Our Darling"./ Jenks keeps the best of boots and shoes/ Looks patient and forbearing/ To show his goods he'll not refuse/ Our patronage he's sharing/ Then E.H. Gale keeps meat to sell/ And http://www.houseofna...ick-family-crest.htm Mirick prints upstairs/ Joe Wilder [ http://merrill.olm.net/shs/cens1880/surname.txt Joseph K. Wilder ] makes our harnesses/ Wears kids and says his prayers./ We've milliners some half a score/ And livery stable keepers/ A mill to grind our corn and rye/ And one to saw our sleepers [i.e. beds]/ We've tinman, dentist, jewelers/ A lockup and a barber/ A place where drugs are kept and sold/ Saloons, where idlers gather!/ A well kept inn, on Shelburne side/ By landlords Cole & Lampman/ And Woodward's House, known far and wide/ Is not void of attraction/ This village claims to have no "stills"/ Where cider comes out brandy/ But never mind, step over to Phil's/ Tis just about as handy./ We've banks to stow away our gold/ And banks of sand and gravel/ A railroad too, a new depot/ And lots of people travel/ A Company to put out fires/ A Band to play and sing/ A factory, where silk is reeled/ And books - Arms' offering./ We've men of talents, mean of means/ We've Masons and Odd Fellows/ We've those who truck with single teams/ Some blow the blacksmith's bellows/ We've saucy boys and simpering girls/ We've tipplers and we've gamblers/ And some alas! professors, too/ Unblushing Sabbath ramblers./ We've peddlers too, of milk and tin/ One rosy cheeked, a maiden/ Who'll bring you milk that's pure and clean/ With sweetest fragrance laden/ Another, one of Scotland's sons/ Taught by his sainted mother/ To do good, we must do right/ And not defraud our brother./ Our village - yes, OUR, for years ago/ Our Home was here - and all that/ We worship now at no. 3/ And buy our tea of Dewsnap/ Our village boasts no millionaire/ Yet we have men of leisure/ We've men who can their broadcloth wear/ Keep "dorgs" and ride for pleasure/ There's English Jo, up on the hill/ And Thayer, grown stout and fatty/ Squire Sam, whose acres others fill/ Two Ebens and a Natty/ We think we now must be excused/ For husband's come to supper/ But if there's more you wish to know/ Please go and ask friend Puffer. (by Q in a Corner, Poet's Seat, Shady Lane, Aug. 1872).
 

Subjects: Amusements, Beverages, Buckland (MA), Charlemont (MA), Clubs, Dreams / Sleep, Drugstores / Drugs, Drunkenness, Economics, Education, Fires, Freemasonry, Garbage, Gays, Horses, Hotels, Libraries and Librarians, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Music, Poetry, Rich People, Sales, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Thu, Jun 26, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 16, 1874
Eternal friendship among young ladies

Eternal friendship among young ladies - Many and desperate are their vows and declarations. No man shall sever them, is the burden of their song. Admitting that they may be trapped into matrimony, which, by the way, is a most remote contingency, their husbands shall have only the second place in their affections, is their declaration. They care about no one but each other, and this they render evident by attempting to snub or treat with supercilious indifference 9 out of every ten people with whom they are brought in contact. They cannot have a thought without the other being acquainted with it; one cannot have a new shawl or a new dress without the other longing to procure one of a precisely similar pattern...A large portion of the "friends’" time is spent in selecting fits for each other. The brooches, the charms, the ear rings, the rings, the bracelets they wear are all marks of the intense affection in which they are mutually held. They cannot be separated without experiencing the keenest pangs and inflicting an immense amount of labor upon the post office officials, for which these functionaries are, no doubt, sufficiently grateful. All this would be very beautiful, were it not for several important facts. In a general way the display of affection, in its most exuberant developments, in nothing more nor less than simple affectation. It is one of the crazes to which young ladies of a sentimental turn of mind seem to be addicted; and which is invariably generated by the reading of mawkish books or some flaw in the system of education which has been pursued in reference to them. Fortunately it does not last long (New York Albion).
 

Subjects: Children, Education, Fashion, Gays, Literature / Web Pages, Mail, Women, Work, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 16, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 3, 1873
Anna Dickinson, having an engagement to lecture at Keesville N.Y. [probably Keeseville] on the 23rd, and being

Anna Dickinson, having an engagement to lecture at Keesville N.Y. [probably http://freepages.gen...eeseville/page6.html Keeseville ] on the 23rd, and being behind time when she arrived at Burlington Vt. chartered a steamer at an expense of $60, on which she crossed Lake Champlain, and then hired a fleet horse, reaching Keeseville only an hour behind time.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Economics, Gays, Horses, Show Business, Transportation, Vermont, Women

Posted by stew - Thu, Jan 16, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 11, 1873
William H. Fultz, a native of Halifax, a graduate of the Episcopal Theological s

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mnwadena/queries99.htm William H. Fultz , a native of http://www.fultzhouse.ca/fultzhistory.html Halifax , a graduate of the Episcopal Theological school at Harvard college, and recently rector of the St. James Episcopal Society at North Cambridge, has been dismissed from his charge on account of admitted improper conduct with a youth named Hill, and has left for parts unknown.
 

Subjects: Gays, Religion, Sex Crimes, Canada

Posted by stew - Thu, Jan 16, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 4, 1873
Dr. Mary Walker was arrested in Baltimore Tues. for appearing on the streets in men's clothes, but was soon afterwards discharged.

Dr. Mary Walker was arrested in Baltimore Tues. for appearing on the streets in men’s clothes, but was soon afterwards discharged.
 

Subjects: Gays, Medical Personnel, Police, Roads, Clothing

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 26, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, October 21, 1872
(Greenfield) The Unitarian Festival Wed. and Thurs. eves. of this week promises to be a very enjoyable affair...A novel and attractive feature will be an exhibition of Greek Statuary by the young la

(Greenfield) The Unitarian Festival Wed. and Thurs. eves. of this week promises to be a very enjoyable affair...A novel and attractive feature will be an exhibition of Greek Statuary by the young ladies of Prospect Hill School. Their program is as follows: "There will be exhibited a rare and unique collection of Greek Statuary, recently excavated, which by its extreme beauty of outline and delicacy of workmanship overshadows all previously known collections [They are talking about a live tableaux, if you haven't caught on yet]. The real http://users.pandora...pages/venus_milo.htm Venus of Milo [wonder how they pulled this one off ;-)], the unrivaled Sappho , and many other statues equally worthy of notice will render the first exhibition a feast to the eye as well as an instruction to the mind, as a short but pithy reference will be made to their respective positions in the Greek Mythology. The peculiarity of the present collection is the exquisite blending of black and white marbles, giving a lifelike expression and a perfection of color, in which if art does not surpass it surely rivals nature. At the close of the evening the Statuary will be sold at auction and it is hoped that our citizens will not lose this opportunity of placing in some favored niche so rare a bit of marble beauty - history poetized in stone - as will now be placed within their reach.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Art, Education, Eye, Fairs, Gays, Greenfield (MA), Statues, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Work


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