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Mar 6, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield

Greenfield - Front room to let on Federal Street, first floor, to gentleman and wife, or to one or two ladies. Furnished or unfurnished with one sleeping room on 2 flights of stairs. Apply to Joel Wilson.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Dreams / Sleep, Greenfield (MA), Households, Marriage and Elopement, Roads, Women

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield

Greenfield - Tenement to rent on Wells Street near Main, 4 rooms, $6,25 per month in advance. Apply to Joel Wilson.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Households, Roads

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
John Chinaman in New York

John Chinaman in New York - The New York Tribune describes the haunts of the Chinese in that city as follows:

In the Sixth Ward is a small district where most of the Chinese in New York live. A visitor to their opium smoking dens may go to Baxter Street, just below Franklin, where was formerly Donovan’s lane, the resort of the most desperate villains in the city, but which is now a Y-shaped court shut in on all sides by high tenement houses.

On the ground floor of one of these buildings is the establishment of "Old John", a Chinaman 74 years old, who has been in the United States 47 years, and was the first of his race to become naturalized. His quarters comprise three rooms. By the door is seated his assistant, who gives out the drug. Upon one side of the room is a low platform or dais; sometimes there are two, one above the other, like births upon which men are to be seen reclining in the different stages of opium intoxication. [How interesting - guess that’s where the word ’berths’ comes from].

The pipes consist of a bamboo stem and a porcelain bowl about 2 inches in diameter, in the centre [sic] of which is a small receptacle for the opium. A small piece of the drug is taken up on an iron rod and heated until it is dried to a proper consistency. Then it is inserted into the pipe, and the smoker slowly draws the smoke through, soon filling the whole room with a peculiar smell.

The proprietor furnishes his customers with pipes and a place to lie down. The drug is weighed out upon a rude pair of reed scales. The weight used is a silver coin. Each smoker is provided with a small horn box, which will contain about 15 cents’ worth of opium, enough to last an average smoker all night. The preparation is undoubtedly adulterated, since it costs the druggist $23.50 a pound.

A few doors below, on the same side, is another place where smoking is carried on, which does not differ materailly from Old John’s. There is, however, a temple connected with it. On the wall is hung a gayly [sic] painted picture of some Chinese god, at whose shoulder, on one side, man’s good angel is represented, and on the other, his evil angel.

The faces are very grotesque, and resemble those painted upon tea chests. Hanging upon the picture are numerous tinsel and paper flowers, with faces painted upon the petals, and a little below the picture is a shrine upon which stand two candles, to be lighted only upon festival occasions.

In the middle is a dish containing sand, in which are the burned fragments of several joss sticks. The pious Celestial lights one of these, and placing it in the sand on the altar prays to his deity. From the ceiling hangs two Chinese lanterns, and there is also a glass vessel containing some kind of vegetable oil in which floats a burning wick.

A cup of the same oil is placed in the shrine for the especial use of the god. Upon the wall are hung bulletin boards where the news which agitates the Chinese world is pasted. A curious scroll, resembling the red cover on a pack of fire crackers, attracts attention and proves to be a directory of business of the principal Chinese merchants in San Francisco.
 

Subjects: Art, Beverages, Births, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Chinese, Criminals, Drug Abuse, Drugstores / Drugs, Economics, Emigration and Immigration, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Furniture, Glass / Windows, Households, Light, Literature / Web Pages, Names, Old Age, Racism, Religion, Roads, Smoking and Tobacco

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The first colored Senator Reverend H.R. Revels



The first colored Senator Reverend H.R. Revels [Hiram R. Revels] - A correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial writes from Holly Springs, Mississippi, as follows concerning ex-Senator Revels, now a Methodist minister near there: "When we entered the door of the plain white frame meeting house, it was filled with worshipers. The Pastor is held in high esteem by his flock at home.

He is both law maker and shepard [i.e. shepherd], statesman and preacher. His party has put an "Hon." [Honorable] before his name, and a college of his church has put a "D.D." [Doctor of Divinity" behind it. He cane home from Washington City as pure as he went,which cannot be said of every white Senator [or ANY Senator these days]...



Pastor Revels is a man of about 30, rather below medium height, with wide perceptive faculties, and a face remarkably bland and winning. He is a light mulatto,with eyes tinged with blue. He is comely, graceful and dignified, and in manner as polite as Chesterfield, without the least affectation.

His voice is strong and rich of accordant tones, his modulation distinct, his sentences models of compact English. You can almost see his punctuation points as he speaks, so exactly measured and as symmetrical as his diction. His gestures are mostly with the forearm, hand and finger, as if he would paint on canvas every shade of his meaning, and touch delicately every color of flower in his rhetoric.

There is no bombast, no trick of syllable or scare of sound. He just talks to you right out in an earnest, straightforward way, and you are arrested, interested, affected and helped by what he says. All this from a farm chattel - a United States Senator, a self-made man.

But he is far in advance of his race. He is a pioneer. Well might his colored substitute in the pulpit, a preacher black as ebony, referring to Pastor Revels in his public prayer, beseech blessings upon the head of "de old, leader of the army". We "heard a white amen to that. And he has an army of a congregation!"

It is much above the average in intelligence, and the order and attention excellent. The Pastor’s influence over the people is marvelous. He can sway a thousand people by a gesture or a word. He said to us that strange as certain demonstrations might seem, it was paradise in order and sweetness to what it had been in former days.


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Art, Education, Eye, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Noise, Politics, Racism, Religion, Scandals, War / Weaponry, Words, Work

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Why she didn’t catch it



Why she didn’t catch it - One of our prominent merchants was informed a day or two since , when he went home to tea, that there was a mouse in the sitting room; it had run in there during the afternoon, and they had shut the door to keep it in until someone came to catch it. "Well, why didn’t YOU catch it?" said the gentleman to his wife as he started for the sitting room, banging the door pretty sharply behind him.

The ladies - there were 2 or 3 callers present - waited in breathless silence and were soon startled by a yell that sent the lady of the house into a swoon and one of the callers to the rescue.



Opening the door, there was the gentleman with his pants half off, both hands grasping the antipodes of the small of his back,and he executing a Modoc war dance in the middle of the room.

The lady said "What is it?" The gentleman said "You clear out and call my wife". Soon as cold water and camphor had revived her, the lady of the house went in and quiet soon was restored. Inquiry elicited the fact that when the gentleman went in and discovered the mouse he went for it at once, and the mouse went up the leg of his pantaloons and got in such a position that he could not be shook out, and fearing that he would bite as well as scratch, he seized him with both hands, and then found it impossible to get his pants off alone.When the mouse was finally removed his wife quietly remarked "You see now why I didn’t catch it". The gentleman said he did. (Faribault Democrat) [Minnesota].


 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Beverages, Businesspeople, Dance, Households, Jokes, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Masculinity (Machismo), Medicine / Hospitals, Native Americans, Noise, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Clothing, Water

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Centennial bell



The Troy Times has the following description of the new bell which is to be cast for Independence Hall, Philadelphia:

Meneely & Kimberley of this city, who are making a bell of 13,000 pounds for the tower of Old Independence Hall in Philadelphia...have received permission to select several cannon from those now in store at the W[?] Arsenal, to be cast in the bell. [A short article follows].
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Fairs, Heritage Activities, History, Literature / Web Pages, War / Weaponry, Work

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
General

A man named Barber made a vow a generation ago, that he would never cut his hair until Henry Clay was elected President. He died out in California the other day after having long lived a hermit's life, without having broken it.


 

Subjects: Barber / Hair, Obituaries, Politics, Words

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Bummers in San Francisco

Bummers in San Francisco ... San Francisco has a ...full ... of bummers. Nowhere else can a worthless fellow too lazy to work, too cowardly to steal, get on so well. The climate befriends him, for he can sleep out of doors 4/5 of the year, and the free lunch opens to him boundless vistas of carnal delights. He can gorge himself daily, for a nominal sum get a dinner that a king would envy for 50 cents.




There are two classes of saloons where the midday repasts are furnished - two-bit places and one-bit places. In the first he gets a drink and a meal. In the second he gets a drink and a meal of inferior quality. He pays for the drink, 25 or 15 cents, according to the grade of the place, and gets his meal for nothing.



This consists of,in the better class of establishment, soup, boiled salmon, roast beef of the best quality, bread and butter, potatoes, tomatoes, crackers, and cheese.
Many of these places are fitted up in a style of Oriental grandeur. A stragner entering one of them casually might be under the delusion that he had found his way by mistake to the salon of a San Francisco millionaire.

He would find mirrors reaching from floor to ceiling, carpets of the finest texture and most appropriate patterns, massive tables covered with papers and periodicals, the walls embellished with expensive paintings. A large picture which had adorned a famous drink bar and free lunch house was sold the other day for $12,500. Some of the keepers are men of education and culture. One is an art critic of high local repute, who has written ...very readable...San Francisco. Scribner’s.

[After struggling to read this, I found it to be an excerpt of Scribner’s Monthly, July 1875, "The city of the Golden Gate", by Samuel Williams, p. 274].


 

Subjects: Art, Chinese, Dreams / Sleep, Economics, Education, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Furniture, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Meat, Rich People, Robbers and Outlaws, Royalty, Sales, Tramps, Vendors and Purchasers, Weather, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Death of the race horse Planet

Death of the race horse Planet

[See the New York Times archive index for Sept. 8, 1875].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Contests, Horses, Obituaries, Sports

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Clara Morris



Clara Morris - a terrible surgical operation - The wonderful surgical operation performed on the person of Clara Morris, the well known New York actress, in Paris, is described in a letter from a friend of that lady. "Miss Morris’ disease was curvature of the spine.Treated years ago, it could probably have been arrested, but it was a crisis in her profession, and upon success in surmounting many obstacles, her whole future seemed to depend, and she could not spare time for a medical treatment.



A sea voyage failed entirely to produce any change for the better, and a list of the highest medical authorities abroad confirmed her worst fears and condemned her to a horrible operation, the same which Charles Sumner submitted to, for the cure of the same disease. Its main feature is the burning of the flesh of the back from the neck down to the waist with red hot irons.



The operation was performed in Paris, in the presence of Mrs. Worthington, Miss Gabrielle Greeley and Sir William Belmore, the attending physician. Miss Gabrielle Greeley also writes a letter to a New Yorker in which she says "Poor Clara was obliged to sit on a low chair with her back bared, and she went through the operation with her face pale and rigid as marble. Dr. Belvin lit his furnace, and the roaring of the flames that was to heat the iron to a white heat in a few seconds was dreadful to hear, and while this was going on Professor Ball marked with a pencil the line the iron was to follow on either side of the spine.

Every touch of the pencil sent a thrill through the delicate frame of the poor victim, but the Professor had scarcely ended making the penciled marks when with a flash the iron was applied. It was dreadful. The white point seemed to sink an inch into the quivering form, and it was all over. The doctor said it was a wonderful exhibit of nerves."


 

Subjects: Diseases, Fires, French, Furniture, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Politics, Quacks and Quackery, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Show Business, Transportation, Vacations, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Poetry

Poetry - The Wedding [signed Shelburne Falls]

"What means this blaze at the parsonage?
For what is this rumpus, I pray?
This flitting hither and thither?
A wedding's coming off, they say"...etc.

 

Subjects: Fires, Marriage and Elopement, Noise, Poetry, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Metcalf & Luther

Metcalf & Luther - [Illustration of an eye, with an imp leaning on top of it with a bandage covering one eye, between the letters O and C]. O C $50,000.00 worth of house furnishing goods to be sold this Fall, regardless of cost! ...

Furniture, carpets, crockery, stoves, tin ware, wooden ware, bedding, feathers, etc....

Metcalf & Luther, 435 Main Street, opposite Court Square,Springfield, Mass.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Art, Birds, Business Enterprises, Courts, Economics, Eye, Furniture, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Households, Pottery / Crockery, Roads, Sales, Stores, Retail

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Dissolution

Dissolution - The firm heretofore existing under the name of King & Hubbard, is this day dissolved by mutual consent. All persons indebted to said firm for more than 30 days are requested to make immediate settlement and save costs. Millers Falls.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Economics, Millers Falls (MA), Montague (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Silver plated solid steel knives

Silver plated solid steel knives - a full assortment of these knives which every family is now using in preference to all others, just received and selling low. A good thing for $3 per dozen. C.P. Forbes. Greenfield.


 

Subjects: Cutlery, Economics, Family, Greenfield (MA), Stores, Retail, Vendors and Purchasers, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Mrs. Dr. L.F. Hagar



Mrs. Dr. L.F. Hagar, healing medium, has taken rooms at the house of D.G. Shaw on Wells Street, where she is prepared to prescribe for the sick or attend to calls if desired. Special attention given to chronic diseases and the diseases of children. References given if required. A liberal patronage is desired.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Children, Diseases, Greenfield (MA), Households, Medical Personnel, Medicine / Hospitals, Quacks and Quackery, Roads, Spiritualism, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Meals cooked to order

Meals cooked to order at all times of the day and evening at Richardson's dining room, Greenfield.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Business Enterprises, Food, Greenfield (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Situation wanted

Situation wanted - An American lady wishes a home to assist in light housework and sewing. Satisfactory reference given. Address Miss C.S. Lock, Box 15, Greenfield, Mass.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Greenfield (MA), Households, Racism, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Diphtheria



Diphtheria - The best and simplest remedy - Make a salve of the ashes of burned corn cobs and take a little of it often. Also wet a bag of commercial ashes with rum and put around the neck. Experience has proved it a cure where other remedies have failed. From one who knows. Please put this in print to the benefit of the afflicted. [Oh, brother!].
 

Subjects: Diseases, Food, Liquors, Quacks and Quackery

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
August Flower



August Flower - The most miserable beings in the world are those suffering from dyspepsia and liver complaint. More than 75% of the people in the United States are afflicted with these two diseases and their effects, such as Sour Stomach, Sick Headache, Habitual Costiveness, Palpitation of the Heart, Heart-burn, Water-brash, gnawing and burning pains at the pit of the Stomach, Yellow Skin, Coated Tongue, and disagreeable taste in the mouth, coming up of food after eating, low spirits, etc.

Go to the Drug Store of Childs & Payne, Greenfield, and W.B. Andrews, Orange, and get a 75 cent bottle, or a sample bottle for 10 cents. Try it. Two doses will relieve you.


 

Subjects: Advertising, Business Enterprises, Diseases, Drugstores / Drugs, Economics, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Germans, Glass / Windows, Greenfield (MA), Medicine / Hospitals, Orange (MA), Quacks and Quackery

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Marriages

Married in Greenfield Sept. 16, O.B. Douglas to Maria L. Tiddy, both of Springfield.
 

Subjects: Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Marriage and Elopement

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Marriages

Married in New Salem on Sept. 2, Lester Ballard of Wendell to Emma F. Parkhurst of Chelmsford.
 

Subjects: Marriage and Elopement, Massachusetts, New Salem (MA), Wendell (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Marriages

Married in Holyoke Sept. 8, Frederick H. Warner of Boston to Eleanor Skinner, eldest daughter of William Skinner.

[For more information, see Google Books "Encyclopedia of Massachusetts, biographical--genealogical, Volume 6"
by William Richard Cutter].
 

Subjects: Boston (MA), Family, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Massachusetts, Rich People

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Marriages

Married in N. Amherst Sept. 13, Edward C. Hawkes of Charlemont to Mary P. Gaylord.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Marriage and Elopement

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Marriages

Married in Winchester N.H. Sept. 5, H.G. Eaton to Julia M. Goodell, both of Winchester.
 

Subjects: Marriage and Elopement, New Hampshire

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Births

Born in Greenfield Sept. 15, a son to the widow of John Collins; Sept. 18, a son to Michael Sauter.
 

Subjects: Births, Greenfield (MA), Widows and Widowers, Women


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