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Mar 8, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Freemasonry

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

William Knapp, aged 90, died at Newburyport on Sun. He was one of the first abolitionists and the brother of Isaac Knapp, the original partner of Garrison in the Liberator. He was one of the oldest Freemasons in the State, and was Master of a Lodge 60 years ago.

[See the Internet Archive's full text of "History of Newburyport, Mass., 1764-1905].
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Clubs, Family, Freemasonry, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Obituaries, Old Age

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Athol

Dr. John H. Williams, one of Athol's prominent citizens, died suddenly Sun. from paralysis of the brain. He arose, but not feeling well, retired again, and on being called to breakfast, complained of dizziness, but came downstairs and lay on a sofa. He kept growing worse and medical aid was summoned, but death finally relieved him in the late aft.

Dr. Williams has long been a resident of Athol, and in his business and other affairs has established an enviable reputation for honesty and integrity...Of late he has been much depressed, and probably the losses which he has endured and the anxiety attending them were the final cause of his death. The funeral was fully attended Wed., both by the Masons of the Star and Athol lodges and the people generally.
 

Subjects: Athol (MA), Businesspeople, Clubs, Diseases, Dreams / Sleep, Economics, Food, Freemasonry, Furniture, Medical Personnel, Mourning Customs, Obituaries

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 2, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Northfield Farms

Samuel Alexander, who died here on Wed, aged 88 years, lived throughout his long life in the same house in which he was born, and was in the habit of eating his Thanksgiving dinner in the same room. His father, who lived to be 92 years of age, also dwelt before him in the same house from the time of his marriage, a century ago. Mr. Alexander was a soldier of the war of 1812, and the oldest member of Harmony Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons. He retained his faculties till the last, and ate dinner at the table with the family the day of his death.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Curiosities and Wonders, Family, Food, Freemasonry, Furniture, History, Holidays, Households, Northfield (MA), Obituaries, Old Age, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

An effort is being made here to organize a Masonic Mutual Relief Association.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Freemasonry, Greenfield (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 14, 1875
Shelburne Falls

The funeral of L.V. Putney Esq. [Louis V. Putney] was attended on Tues. aft., Rev. E.E. Lamb officiated. He was buried with Masonic honors. He died Mon. morning at the residence of his father Nahum Putney, after an illness of about one year. He studied law with S.T. Field Esq., and has been practicing with his brother William [William Bement Putney] in New York. He was 32 years old, had numerous friends, and was a young man of promise.
 

Subjects: Cemeteries, Clubs, Diseases, Education, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Freemasonry, Households, Law and Lawyers, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 7, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

We referred last week to the fact that Republican Lodge was organized under a charter granted by Paul Revere in 1795. The first record book of the lodge is still preserved, and is quite an interesting relic of antiquity. We find that in the original bylaws the fraternity were subjected to very strict rules, as will be seen by the following extract: "Should any Brother be so impudent as to make use of any profane language or indecent behavior during Lodge hours, he or they so offending shall pay a fine of one shilling, lawful money, for every such offense, to be put into the fund for the relief of the poor brethren.

/ And the fraternity were instructed to be cautious, both within and without the lodge, that no reflection be cast against the order. They had a temperance clause in their bylaws, too: "If any Brother should be so void of shame as to disguise himself with liquor, or come to the lodge disguised in liquor, he shall be fined 25 cents and be dismissed for the night, and at the next meeting be reprimanded", and no brother was allowed to play cards or gamble. In 1820, however, we find that at a meeting where only 3 were present, it was voted to pass a bill of 18 cents for refreshments, which would cover the price for 3 glasses of rum; but that was a miserable allowance for those days. We find that as early as 1814, Hon. George Grennell, who is yet with us, held an office in the lodge, and a few years afterward was made Worshipful Master.
 

Subjects: Charity, Clubs, Drunkenness, Economics, Freemasonry, Gambling, Glass / Windows, Greenfield (MA), History, Law and Lawyers, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Poor, Temperance, Words

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 24, 1875
Hampshire County items

A rare mine of last year's reservoir relics has lately been uncovered at Haydenville, where Superintendent Hanson of the cotton mill set a number of workmen digging over a pile of stones below the mill dam. From it they have taken an almost inconceivable variety of things - a steam engine and boiler, silver bell, silver cups, clocks, sewing machines, gold pens, harnesses, the brass shop bell, emblems of Free Masonry, brass pumps, shafting, etc. Pictures that have lain a year under the ground are quite distinct. A cut glass altar from the lodge came over the dam and was taken out whole from under tons of stone; a spy glass, too, was perfect, though filled with sand.
 

Subjects: Archaeology, Business Enterprises, Clubs, Curiosities and Wonders, Disasters, Freemasonry, Glass / Windows, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Work, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 3, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The Connecticut Valley Commandery of Knight Templars have received an invitation to attend the dedication of the new Masonic Temple at New York City June 22nd. This edifice has been in process of erection for several years, and when completed will undoubtedly be the most costly and imposing Masonic building in the United States. The public exercises of the dedication are arranged on a scale commensurate with the whole undertaking, and as it is to be participated in by the members of the fraternity from every State in the Union it cannot fail to be a noteworthy event. The Connecticut Valley Commandery have also received a cordial invitation to join with the Springfield Commandery in attending the dedication and have decided so to act. The Springfield Commandery and those uniting with them have engaged Brown's Brigade Band, 20 pieces, to accompany them. From 20 to 30 of the Sir Knights are expecting to go from here.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Economics, Freemasonry, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Music, Transportation, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 3, 1875
Turners Falls

Mr. Henry C. Putnam, superintendent of the Keith Mill, was presented Fri. with a beautiful gold and enameled pin, emblematic of the Masonic order.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Clubs, Freemasonry, Montague (MA), Turners Falls (MA), Work, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
Athol

A bold robbery was committed in Houghton's Block a few days since, the old Masonic Hall being entered, and a quantity of property belonging to Water Cure Lodge, I.O.G.T. taken away.
 

Subjects: Athol (MA), Beverages, Clubs, Crime, Economics, Freemasonry, Quacks and Quackery, Robbers and Outlaws

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
Athol

A very pleasant gathering of the members of Athol Lodge, F. and A.M., with their ladies, was held in the Lodge room on Thurs. eve., it being the 25th anniversary of the marriage of Brother Erastus Smith. The eve. was passed happily with vocal and instrumental music, speaking, presentations, social chat, an abundance of fruits, confectionery, pastry and other "good things". During the eve. Bro. E.T. Lewis, on behalf of the brethren, presented the bridal pair with a fine table, and a lot of silver cutlery, spoons, etc. Shortly after, Bro. W.H. Amsden was escorted to the front, and to him Dr. Humphreys, on behalf of the Lodge presented an elegant silver P.M.'s jewel.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Athol (MA), Clubs, Cutlery, Food, Freemasonry, Furniture, Marriage and Elopement, Music, Parties, Religion, Women, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 5, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Found, a muff, shopping bag and Masonic pin. the respective owners can get possession by calling at this office.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Freemasonry, Greenfield (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Lost and Found, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 29, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

There were 27 couples at the closing hop of the series held by the Masonic Fraternity Thurs. eve., and a very appropriate finale it was of the winter's pleasures. The music was by the Orange Quadrille Band, and the refreshments served by Tyler Pritchard.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Dance, Food, Freemasonry, Greenfield (MA), Music, Orange (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 22, 1875
Who men marry

Who do they marry? A wife? No. They really marry business, pleasure, ambition, almost everything but a wife. By and by, they fall passionately in love with some pretty face, or voluptuous form, and straight way they possess themselves of the ideal. They own - they may think they marry - the minister may tell them they are lawfully wed. But he is mistaken, for the true married life must be lived, not merely spoken. There are so many mere spoken marriages.

/ In the block where I live there is only one man really married to his wife. They all have establishments - only one a home. One man is married to a lot of dogs; they are fine looking fellows, as sleek as good living can make them. When he goes away in the morning they go to the car, wish him a doggish goodbye, and then dutifully go home to await their master's return. When he returns at night they run to meet him and kiss his hands, and roll at his feet, and he stoops and caresses them. I often wish I could follow them home and see what fun and frolic they have indoors. "Love me, love my dog". What does the woman think of this? Another is married to his books. He is a stranger in his own house.

/ Another is married to his whiskey jug, and when he comes at night to his lodgings, his nose is very red, and he is apt to hit his toes against his heels. What does the woman think here? Another is married to anybody else but his wife. His attentions go the rounds among all the good looking ladies, while one poor woman stays at home and keeps the house and children. The neighbors say she is dying of consumption, but I say it is heart disease.

/ Another has married the lodge. He has invested all his capital in taking degrees. And now instead of the returns coming in he is obliged to pay interest on his investment in monthly dues, which take all his spare cash. This is the alternative, payment or ignominious expulsion from the craft. His house is going to ruin, and the woman looks shabby.

/ But the man who has married a wife. I see her go to the door every morning when her husband goes away; I see him kiss his wife as he leaves and then she goes in to sing and to tidy their home. At night she meets him at the gate, and he always has some petful words for her. When they walk out she lovingly leans on his arm. He is the only happy man in the block.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Beverages, Businesspeople, Children, Clubs, Diseases, Drunkenness, Economics, Freemasonry, Households, Law and Lawyers, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Masculinity (Machismo), Music, Religion, Women, Words

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 15, 1875
News about home

(Greenfield) The Lady Washington Tea Party, to be given by the ladies of the Unitarian Society at Washington Hall next Thurs. promises to be a very pleasant affair. Supper will be served to all who wish to partake from 5 until 7 o'clock. Martha Washington with George in full costume will hold a reception, and it is desirable that as many guests as possible shall attend in dress of the 18th century, though people who desire to attend in modern dress are not excluded.

/ At 8 o'clock the floor will be cleared for dancing, and it is proposed that the first figure shall be the Virginia Reel., and that only those in costume shall participate. After this interesting event the floor shall be open to all who hold tickets. The Orange Quadrille Band, which has played so acceptably at the Masonic Sociables this winter, will furnish the music...
 

Subjects: Amusements, Beverages, Clubs, Dance, Food, Freemasonry, Government, Greenfield (MA), History, Music, Orange (MA), Parties, Religion, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 8, 1875
News about home

(Greenfield) The Masonic Fraternity and ladies had such a good party and good time at their closing sociable Wed. eve., notwithstanding the storm, that they voted to have just one more last dance, which will come off on the eve. of the 25th.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Dance, Freemasonry, Greenfield (MA), Parties, Weather

Posted by stew - Sat, Jun 3, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 8, 1875
(Greenfield) Republican Lodge of F & A.M. have accepted an invitation from Athol Lodge of Athol to attend a Grand Masonic Jubil

(Greenfield) Republican Lodge of F & A.M. have accepted an invitation from Athol Lodge of Athol to attend a http://www.brynmawr....masonic/masonic.html Grand Masonic Jubilee , to be held at Music Hall the eve. of Feb. 18. It is expected that a large no. of the fraternity, with ladies, will attend.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Athol (MA), Clubs, Freemasonry, Greenfield (MA), Trains, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, May 29, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 8, 1875
(Greenfield) The last of the series of Masonic sociables will be held tomorrow eve., those having the matter in charge thinking it best to change the night of the week, with the hope of better luck i

(Greenfield) The last of the series of Masonic sociables will be held tomorrow eve., those having the matter in charge thinking it best to change the night of the week, with the hope of better luck in regard to the weather.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Freemasonry, Greenfield (MA), Luck, Parties, Weather

Posted by stew - Mon, Mar 6, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 1, 1875
(Greenfield) The storm of Thurs. eve. interfered some what with the Masonic sociable, but those who were present made it a gay and festive party. There is to be one more to complete the series Tues.

(Greenfield) The storm of Thurs. eve. interfered some what with the Masonic sociable, but those who were present made it a gay and festive party. There is to be one more to complete the series Tues. eve. Feb. 9.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Freemasonry, Greenfield (MA), Parties, Weather

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 25, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 25, 1875
Dedication of Erving's new town hall

Dedication of http://www.northquab.../index_page0005.html Erving 's new town hall - Friday was an important day in the quiet little town of http://www.rootsweb.com/~mafrankl/zerv.html Erving . The morning was a stormy one, rain and snow alternating, and the afternoon came off clear, in time for the parade to assemble for the dedication of the new http://www.franklinc...rving/everts/08.html Town Hall . Whatever may have been the opinion of the citizens of the town to the necessity or practicability of building the Hall, they are now all united in their admiration of the beautiful structure, which in the past few months has been erected in the heart of the village. Several town meetings were held in the spring before an appropriation was carried for the new building; and it was then decided by a very close vote. The first appropriation was $12,000, but at a subsequent meeting $2500 was added, to permit certain changes from the original plan and for furnishing the hall. The following gentlemen were selected as a building committee: E.H. Spring, http://www.franklinc...rving/everts/03.html Charles A. Eddy , http://www.franklinc...rving/everts/12.html M.F.B. Howe , L.L. Perry, W.F. Hanson. The land for the new building was purchased of Danforth Putnam of Orange for $1000. L.L. Perry of http://www.franklinc...ng/everts/index.html Erving was the architect, furnishing all the plans and specifications, and the beautifully proportioned building and its convenient arrangement attest to his good taste and skill. The foundations were put in by Morse and Ward of Orange. The contract for the building was let to George O. Peabody of Turners Falls, who has constructed several of the manfacturing establishments and large buildings of that place. The superintendence of this work was left to his foreman, Chester N. Tyler, and so faithfully has the contract been carried out, that at no time during the construction have the building committee had occasion to complain of any slight in the work. The best material has been used, and the building is a model of thoroughness in every part. Mr. Peabody's original contract was for putting up the building and finishing off the hall for $8400. He was afterwards given $4300 more to finish off two stores in the first story. The building is 50 x 70 ft. outside, two stories high with a French roof. The basement is finished with two rooms that are suitable for a market in the grocery business, and here too has been built a fireproof lockup for the accommodations of rogues or tramps. The first floor above is divided by two stores, 24 x 50, and connected with each is a back room, 29 ft. deep. The Hall is on the second floor, taking in with the gallery the full length and breadth of the building, and measuring 20 ft. in height. The floor is of southern Pine, the woodwork is painted a neat drab, while the walls and ceilings are beautifully frescoed. The stage or platform is made so that it may be extended or contracted. The hall will seat when filled, 500 to 600 persons. It is furnished with Morse's patent [?] manufactured at Athol, and a great improvement to those formerly in use. There are inside blinds to the windows, and a chandelier of 12 lights is suspended in the center of the room. There is nothing about the Hall but what has been dictated with the best of taste. The painting deserves special notice. It was done by the Bartlett Bros. of Turners Falls who employed Germans from Springfield to do the frescoing. There are two anterooms under the gallery. The upper part of the building, well lighted by the French roof, is unfinished. It is proposed someday to fit it up for a Masonic Hall. The brick work of the building was done by Campbell and Hazleton of Turners Falls, and the plastering by R.B.P. Wheeler of Orange. The building is painted a plain white outside, and was slated by a Mr. Johnson of Fitchburg. Mr. Peabody commenced his contract the 11th of July and finished it by the 1st of January, within the prescribed time, and what is more remarkable, within the appropriation, so that the committee find now in their hands an unexpended balance. It shows an honest stewardship on their part and corresponding uprightness in the builder. The building is certainly one in which Erving may take pride; for a better one for the purpose to which it is to be devoted cannot be found in the county, and it will meet a want that has been long felt. The ceremonies of the presentation were presided over by http://www.franklinc...rving/everts/03.html Noah Rankin , and were opened by prayer by Rev. A. Stowell of Erving. Next came a song by a quartette of gentlemen from Orange: A.J. Fisher, William P. Barker, A. Kendall and H.A. Leisure, while Walter Stone of Erving accompanied them on an organ. The singing was exceedingly good, and a very pleasant feature of the programme. The orator of the occasion, George W. Horr, Esq. of Athol, was now introduced to the audience. He announced the theme of his address to be "Towns of Massachusetts: their history in colonial times and under the Constitution of the State and the nation; their influence in shaping, moulding [sic], and perfecting a democratic form of government". He compared the towns organized by the early settlers with those of other countries where they are merely collections of houses with no power for self government. Here each [?] the primary organization was an independent municipality. Counties were here formed long after the towns were organized. He looked upon the instrument signed in the cabin of the Mayflower as the foundation from which was derived the system of State and National governance. The town of Erving cast a vote of 49 to [?] when it elected in 1832 Hon. Whiting Griswold a delegate to the constitutional convention. Erving was originally [?] or plantation, and was purchased in 1751 [?] by http://www.northquab.../index_page0005.html John Erving Esq. of Boston. [?} http://www.franklinc...rving/everts/03.html Asaph White , a prominent and wealthy man of his day [first settler in 1801]. From the record of 18[?], it appears that the total tax for town expenses was $34, and that Col. White, the heaviest tax payer, paid $4.54. The town now has a surplus fund of $900, {?] which is used for school purposes. The speaker [?] unqualified term...commendation...Greene's orchestra from Fitchburg...A letter was read from [?], the only survivor of the first of our town. She lives in the family of Deacon S.W. Dutton of Northfield, who married her...she recalled that when she came to Erving Grant 74 years ago there was no neighbor within two miles. Austin DeWolf Esq. of Greenfield was the next speaker. He had been trying out a road on Bear Mountain, and didn't know why they should call upon him, unless they were carrying out...Mr. DeWolf is the owner of extensive... http://www.frcog.org/emptp.PDF Erving . He had had occasion ...to look over the early records and maps of the township. He found that the Grant contained [?] lots of land...R.N. Oakman Esq. of Montague...H.C. Tenney of Orange...congratulations...Dr. Roswell Field of Gill... http://www.franklinc...rving/everts/08.html blessing ...
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Athol (MA), Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Clubs, Criminals, Economics, Education, Elections, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Fires, Food, Freemasonry, French, Furniture, Germans, Gill (MA), Glass / Windows, Government, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, History, Households, Inventions

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 25, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 25, 1875
(Orange) Masonic services over the remains of J.W. Copeland were held at the Universalist church on Sat. A large delegation of fellow workmen from the Gold Medal Sewing Machine Company shop, as well

(Orange) Masonic services over the remains of J.W. Copeland were held at the Universalist church on Sat. A large delegation of fellow workmen from the Gold Medal Sewing Machine Company shop, as well as from Orange Lodge of Masons, of which the deceased was a member, were in attendance. The remains were converted to Brattleboro for interment.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Cemeteries, Clubs, Freemasonry, Households, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Orange (MA), Religion, Transportation, Vermont, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 12, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 18, 1875
Masonic dances

Masonic dances - A series of dances will be held at the Town Hall, Northfield, under the auspices of Harmony Lodge, as follows...masquerade ball...Ball’s Quadrille Band. Tickets for the course, $3; single, $1. doors open at 6 p.m.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Dance, Economics, Freemasonry, Music, Northfield (MA)

Posted by stew - Wed, Jan 25, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 11, 1875
(Athol) Frank Bannon has purchased the billiard hall in Masonic Block.

(Athol) Frank Bannon has purchased the billiard hall in Masonic Block.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Athol (MA), Clubs, Freemasonry, Vendors and Purchasers

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 16, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 11, 1875
(Greenfield) The sociable at the Masonic Hall on Thurs. eve. attracted a number of the Fraternity and their ladies. Powers' Quadrille Band from Orange came on the evening train, and dancing was kept

(Greenfield) The sociable at the Masonic Hall on Thurs. eve. attracted a number of the Fraternity and their ladies. Powers’ Quadrille Band from Orange came on the evening train, and dancing was kept up until a late hour. The party was a pleasant affair.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Dance, Freemasonry, Music, Orange (MA), Parties, Trains, Women

Posted by stew - Tue, Jan 3, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 4, 1875
(Hinsdale N.H.) 100 Masons and their friends recently had a dance in the American Hall, with the Fitchburg Band for music.

(Hinsdale N.H.) 100 Masons and their friends recently had a dance in the American Hall, with the Fitchburg Band for music.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Dance, Freemasonry, Music, New Hampshire


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