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Sep 19, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: English (and England)

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Conway

Conway - Lovers of the beautiful, visit Mrs. M. Lawrence's and see her lovely large flowering maple with its hanging bell-like blossoms.



We have also never seen such a fine delicately trained English ivy as the one owned by Mrs. J. Tucker.
 

Subjects: Conway (MA), English (and England), Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 23, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Oration of Hon. George B. Loring at Bloody Brook, Sept. 17, 1875

Oration of Hon. George B. Loring at Bloody Brook, Sept. 17, 1875 - Fellow citizens: 200 years ago an event occurred on this spot, which on account of its significance and its touching details, has passed into that long heroic line over which the mind of man is compelled to pause and ponder...At the name of Bloody Brook the men, women, and children of New England started and held their breath in horror, in that primeval time when the sickening tidings were borne on the wings of the wind as it were from hamlet to hamlet...

The sad event of the 18th of September 1675, calls upon us still to remember the trials through which our fathers passed and to rejoice over that fraternal spirit which bound them together in their day of sorrow, and watered the soil of this charming valley with the choicest blood of the sons of Essex. I stand on ground made sacred to you by the sacrifices of your hardy and devoted progenitors; but I meet here the names of Lothrop and Stevens and Hobbs and Manning and Dodge and Kimball and Trask and Tufts and Mudge and Pickering, of the three-score braves who died that you might possess this goodly land and these pleasant homes...

How would they who were familiar with the cruel warfare of the savage; whose ears had heard the shrieks of the tortured mother mingling with the groans of her dying child, and whose eyes had beheld her fear, her patience and her despair; whose highway was an Indian trail, and whose home was a frontier block-house - how would they rejoice over these sunny fields, these laughing harvests, these busy towns, these tasteful homes, this cultivated landscape adorned with these institutions of learning and religion; and how would they count their own sufferings but small when compared with the manifold blessings which have descended upon the spot made sacred with their blood?

...Deerfield two centuries ago, was on the very confines of civilization - one of the outposts of a feeble Christian people, who had hardly a foothold on this continent, and between whom and the strongholds of power and wealth and learning, rolled 3000 miles of stormy and almost unknown sea. The fate of a great and wide spread empire rested then in the hands of a few colonists scattered along the Atlantic seaboard, divided in interests and tastes, perishing continually from exposure and want, not all actuated by the highest motives, but all recognizing, as by an unerring instinct, the fundamental principle out of which was to grow the American government, and all in danger of being exterminated at any time by the "pestilence which walketh in darkness and the destruction which wasteth at noonday".

Scattered up and down the great extent of territory stretching from the Passamaquoddy Bay to the capes of Florida were but about 200,000 souls, of whom Massachusetts, with Plymouth and Maine, may have had 44,000; New Hampshire and Rhode Island, with Providence each 6000; Connecticut from 17,000 to 20,000; that is, all New England, 75,000...

These people had come largely from that "Germanic race most famed for the love of personal independence". They were not men of high estate, but they were men who possessed an inherent love of land, with all the individual honor and freedom which go along with it...

Of one colony said "Spotswood, a royalist, a High churchman, a traveler", "I have observed here less swearing and profaneness, less drunkenness and debauchery, less uncharitable feuds and animosities, and less knaverys and villanys than in any part of the world where my lot has been"...

In all their customs they were obliged to exercise the utmost simplicity and they voluntarily regulated their conduct by those formal rules, which, in their day, constituted the Puritan’s guide through the world. We are told, as an illustraton of their character and manners, that by the laws of the Plymouth Colony, in 1651, "dancing at weddings was forbidden". In 1660, one William Walker was imprisoned one month for courting "a maid without the leave of her parents".

In 1675, because "there is manifest pride appearing in our streets", the "wearing of long hair or periwigs", and so "superstitious ribands, used to tie up and decorate the hair were forbidden under severe penalty"; the keeping of Christmas was also forbidden "because it was a popish custom". In 1677 an act was passed "to prevent the profaneness of turning the back upon the public worship before it was finished and the blessing pronounced".

Towns were directed to erect a cage near the meeting house, and in all this all offenders against the sanctity of the Sabbath were confined. At the same time children were directed to be placed in a particular part of the meeting house, apart by themselves, and tything-men were ordered to be chosen, whose duty it shall be to take care of them. So strict were they in their observance of the Sabbath that "John Atherton, a soldier of Col. Tyng’s Company", was fined 40 shillings for wetting a piece of an old hat to put into his shoes, which chafed his feet on the march; and those who neglected to attend meeting for 3 months were publicly whipped.

Even in Harvard College students were whipped for gross offenses in the Chapel, in presence of students and professors, and prayers were had before and after the infliction of the punishment. As the settlers of Deerfield are described as being of "sober and orderly conversation", we may suppose that these laws and customs were here rigidly enforced.

[Here follows a section on "subsistence and diet of your ancestors". Also talks about how they were good farmers, fishermen and readers]...

...Possessed evidently of a common origin, for "between the Indians of Florida and Canada the difference was scarcely perceptible", they were divided into tribes, which differed from each other mainly in their fighting capacity, and the vigor with which they roamed from place to place; and they were liable at any time to be swept off by disease, or exterminated by war, or absorbed by other and more powerful tribes.

In language, the North American Indian was limited by the material world, an abstract idea finding no birthplace in his brain and no expression on his tongue. "In marriage the Indian abhorred restraint, and from Florida to the S. Lawrence polygamy was permitted". Divorce meant merely desertion. The wife was a slave. Domestic government was unknown. The Indian youth grew up a warrior, adorned with vermilion and eagle’s feather, as fleet of foot as the deer, and as tolerant of hunger as the wolf; the Indian girl grew up a squaw, degraded and squalid and servile.

A rude agriculture, resulting in a weedy corn crop, and a few squashes and beans, was the Indian’s, or rather the Indian woman’s occupation; he had neither trade nor manufactures. "There can be no society without government; but among the Indian tribes on the soil of our republic, there was not only no written law - there was no traditionary [sic] expression of law; government rested on opinion and usage and the motives to the usage were never imbodied [sic] in language; they gained utterance only in the fact, and power only from opinion...

The Indian had a government without laws; a State without institutions; a church without faith, or creed, or head; a town without schoohouse or meeting house; a punitive system without jails or gibbets; a history based on tradition; a religion based on superstition; he was ignorant of the ownership of land; and knew nothing of a system of inheritance.

As in peace he was an idler - so in war he was a marauder. An organized army was to him unknown. He fought in small bands, seldom over 50 in number, to surprise and slaughter. He pursued, and killed, and scalped. He had neither commissariat nor hospital. He fought his enemy in the rear and in ambush; and he tortured and roasted and devoured his captives. These were the national characteristics which our fathers found on this continent.

Nor did their attempts to modify and humanize and Christianize them meet with much success. The Indian could be tamed, but he was the Indian still...Neither John Eliot nor Roger Williams was able to change essentially the habits and character of the New England tribes..."They are unspeakably indolent and slothful; they deserve little gratitude; they seem to have no sentiments of generosity, benevolence or goodness".

The Moravian Loskiel could not change their character...In New Hampshire and elsewhere schools for Indian children were established; but as they became fledged they all escaped, refusing to be caged. Harvard College enrolls the name of an Algonquin youth among her pupils; but the college parchment could not close the gulf between the Indian character and the Anglo American.

The copper colored men are characterized by a moral inflexibility, a rigidity of attachment to their hereditary customs and manners. The birds and brooks, as they chime forth their unwearied canticles, chime them ever to the same ancient melodies; and the Indian child, as it grows up, displays a propensity to the habits of its ancestors...

The trouble lay deeper. Year after year the Indian discovered an irreconcilable difference between himself and the stranger...When he entered the home of the settler, he discovered that the joys of the fireside could never be found in the group squatted beneath the shelter of the wigwam. He felt the antagonism - and his soul burned within him. The strife was not for land...It was for supremacy. And as revenge is stronger than ambition, and hate is stronger than avarice, so the war raged with unspeakable fury, and was as cruel as the passions of a desperate savage could make it.

The great contest which grew out of this antagonism, and lasted more than a year, unabated either by the heat of summer or the frosts of winter, threatening destruction to the New England colonies, was known as Philip’s War. With the story of this conflict you are all familiar. The peaceful death of Massasoit at a good old age, after a long life of friendly relations with the Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies; the sadder death of his son Alexander, worried out of life by the failure of his intrigues against the colony, and the exposure of his meanness and his crimes; the gradual development of the worst of passions in the breast of Philip, and his passage from treachery to war are all fresh in the memory of all who have traced the hard path which our fathers traveled in the work of settling these shores.

The war which began in Swanzey on the 24th of June, 1675, reached this spot on the 18th of September - three months of murder, and fire, and all the bloody horrors of savage warfare. At the time the war broke out Deerfield had been settled 10 years, or had been deeded for the purposes of settlement to John Pynchon that length of time. It was then, as it is now, one of the most delightful spots in New England...

http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=808204&t=w

And here in the luxurience of that natural beauty, and in the wealth of wood and stream, the Indian found his favorite resort. In this town and in the towns of Hadley and Hatfield he mustered a numerous and a powerful tribe. And upon these lands purchased by the settlers, with titles confirmed by the court, the whites and Indians lived together in peace for years. It is amazing with what rapidity the war, once opened, spread from village to village, and from tribe to tribe in this wilderness...

The Pocumtucks had received their orders - and in a day had stepped from the blessings of peace to the misery of war. having promsied to deliver up their arms, on suspicion that they might misuse them, they broke their promise, fled to Sugar loaf Hill, engaged with Captains Beers and Lothrop commanding the English here, lost 26 of their number, and then sought shelter under the standard of King Philip...

Deerfield too was abandoned; and the attempt to secure a quantity of wheat which had just been partially threshed by the farmers there before their flight, resulted in the massacre which still thrills me with horror, and the anniversary of which we have met to commemorate...From behind hundreds of trees the savages poured their deadily [sic] fire. At the first volley many were killed, and the remainder were panic stricken...Lothrop...was among the first to fall. The savages, numbering nearly 700, "rushed upon the defenceless men, and the work of slaughter was soon complete.

But 6 or 7 Englishmen escaped to tell the tale, of whom one had been shot and tomahawked and left for dead, and another forced his way through the yelling ranks of the savages with the but [sic] of his musket...

While the Indians were employed in mangling, scalping and stripping the dying and the dead, Captain Moseley, who, as has been observed, was ranging the woods, hearing the report of musketry, hastened by a forced march to the relief of his brethren. The Indians, confiding in their superior numbers, taunted him as he advanced, and dared him to the contest. Moseley came on with firmness, repeatedly charged through them, and destroyed a large number with the loss on his side of but 2 killed and 11 wounded...

A quantity of bones lately found in that quarter is very probably the remains of the Indians who fell there at the close of the action. The united English force encamped for the night at Deerfield. They returned in the morning to bury the dead and found a party of the Indians upon the field stripping the bodies of their victims. These they quickly dispatched, and the remains of the brave young men, or some portion of them, were committed to the earth near the spot which we have this day consecrated anew to their memory.

The stream on whose banks they fell, and whose water ran red with their blood, has been called from that day, in memory of the disaster, Bloody Brook...[Two more entire columns follow, but they are quite blurry and unreadable].
 

Subjects: Archaeology, Barber / Hair, Birds, Business Enterprises, Cemeteries, Children, Connecticut, Connecticut River, Courtship, Crime, Criminals, Dance, Deerfield (MA), Diseases, Divorce, Drunkenness, Economics, Education, English (and England), Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Fishes and Fishing, Food

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 23, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Isaac Merritt Singer



Isaac Merritt Singer - This eminent mechanician died at his residence at Old Paignton, near Torquay, England on July 23, 1875, in the 64th year of his age.

[Read more about Isaac Singer, the inventor of the Singer Sewing Machine Company at Wikipedia].


 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, English (and England), Inventions, Literature / Web Pages, Obituaries

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 13, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Foreign



At the London dog show this year, the Rev. J.W. Mellar's champion mastiff, Turk, a dog a little over 7 years old, that has won more than 30 prizes and cups, was valued by his owner at $25,000, and Mr. A.S.D. Fivas Granby, an animal almost as big as a lion, at $50,000. ..
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Contests, Economics, English (and England), Arabs

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 13, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Foreign



A letter from Germany says Jenny Lind Goldsmith recently volunteered to play the melodeon in the English Church at Carlsbad which she was attending unrecognized. She appeared to be a woman of 50 or upward, with nothing about her to attract attention, and was dressed with great plainness and simplicity, without ornament of any kind. Her countenance, no longer beautiful, seemed marked by sorrow, sadness and care.


 

Subjects: English (and England), Germans, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Religion, Show Business, Women, Work, Europe, Clothing

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Foreign



A box was found a few days since in a water course near Windsor Castle, containing 125 false keys to the royal jewel rooms. It has been satisfactorily proved that the box and contents were part of a plan to steal the royal jewels. The keys were found to fit the locks exactly. It has not been found out by what means the bold plan was baffled, or how the box came to be found in proximity to the castle. The case is under investigation.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, English (and England), Households, Lost and Found, Police, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Robbers and Outlaws, Royalty, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
The search for the North Pole



Short article. [See the article entitled "British Arctic Expedition" Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: English (and England), Explorers, Literature / Web Pages, Geography

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Paying for an ecstatic kiss

A short fantasy article about a man traveling in an English train, and a beautiful woman who kissed him in a tunnel, mistaking him for her husband.
 

Subjects: Courtship, English (and England), Trains, Women

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
A night at Parliament



A night at Parliament by Rev. Wayland Hoyt [long article].
 

Subjects: English (and England), Government, Religion

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Foreign

Assaults on ladies in railway carriages are becoming epidemic in Great Britain. Mr. Mooney, "a gentleman highly respected in Dublin", has been arrested for grossly assaulting a married lady in a railway carriage.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, English (and England), Irish, Marriage and Elopement, Sex Crimes, Trains, Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Foreign



According to present arrangements the Prince of Wales will, after remaining in Bombay for a short time, go on to Ceylon and thence to Madras. From Madras the Prince goes by sea to Calcutta, and as it has been arranged that he is to arrive there on Christmas Day, there will be a considerable interval to dispose of in the neighborhood of Madras. Probably Bangalore will be visited and Mysore elephants hunted, and it may be that Hyderabad may be looked in upon.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, English (and England), Holidays, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Royalty, Transportation, Europe

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News of the week



Tom Thumb has a rival in Admiral Tom Trump, a Dutchman of 26, who is 6 inches shorter than the American dwarf and weighs but 26 pounds. He is very intelligent, and speaks 5 languages fluently, English, French, Dutch, German and Italian.

[See more in the Aug. 23, 1875 article entitled "A rival of Tom Thumb" in the New York Times Online Archives].
 

Subjects: Circus, Curiosities and Wonders, English (and England), French, Germans, Italians, Literature / Web Pages, Show Business

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 12, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Foreign


A steam yacht carrying the Queen and royal family, while crossing from Osburne to Portsmouth Wed. aft., collided with and sunk the schooner yacht Mistletoe. A party of ladies and gentlemen were on board the Mistletoe, 3 of whom were drowned and 1 killed. None of the royal party were injured, and their yacht was but slightly damaged.

[See "A fatal collision: Queen Victoria’s yacht runs down a schooner" in the Aug. 30, 1875 issue of the New York Times Online Archive].
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Amusements, English (and England), Literature / Web Pages, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Royalty, Transportation

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 12, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Foreign



A jealous brute of a husband in Manchester, England, under the pretense of putting his arm round his wife's neck as if to kiss her, poured a quantity of vitriol over the poor creature's face. He then pulled her to the ground, knelt on her, and tried to force some more of the burning liquid down her throat, but not succeeding in this, he threw the rest of the vitriol over her face and neck. Strange to say she survived, though of course she is permanently disfigured, while her wretch of a husband has been sentenced to penal servitude for life.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, English (and England), Marriage and Elopement, Prisons, Wife Abuse, Women

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
A French view of Waterloo



Long article from the 8th volume of the "Correspondence de P.J. Proudhon". [See the New York Times online index of June 10, 1875. Unfortunately the scanned PDF file for this article is very poor, atypical for the NYT].
 

Subjects: English (and England), French, History, Literature / Web Pages, Royalty, War / Weaponry, Europe

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 21, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
News of the week

What next? Live frogs are said to be exported from this country to England for breeding purposes.


 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Births, Emigration and Immigration, English (and England)

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 21, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
A glimpse at royalty

[Excerpt from Google Books "The Galaxy: a magazine of entertaining reading", June 1875 - Jan. 1876, p. 185].
 

Subjects: English (and England), Family, Fashion, Royalty

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 20, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
The American evangelists' farewell services in London

Long article about Moody and Sankey.
 

Subjects: English (and England), Music, Religion

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Foreign

Foreign gossip says, the young Marquis of Lorne has a forlorn time of it among his royal wife's relatives. The young princes snub him as a subject, and his German brother-in-law, the heir to the Kaiser's crown, does likewise. On a recent visit to this prince, while his wife was admitted to the imperial circle of Berlin, poor Lorne was "left to cool his heels among the nobility outside"; and at a recent garden party in London, he was peremptorily directed by an equerry of his brother-in-law, the heir apparent, to leave the royal tent, which he had entered without special invitation.



[See John Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll, in Wikipedia]
 

Subjects: English (and England), Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Gays, Germans, Parties, Rich People, Royalty, Women, Europe, Canada

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
The English are the first

The English is [i.e. are] the first of foreign nations to break ground at Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, for the erection of the buildings for the use of their commissioners during the centennial. Japan, Sweden and Morocco are preparing to follow suit, and the other commissions will soon be similarly engaged, the whole making a lively and very picturesque scene. Austria’s requisition for space, which has just been received, calls for 32,000 square feet of the main building and over 21,000 in the art gallery, an increase of 1/3 over the original reservation for that nation. [See Centennial Exhibition in Wikipedia].


 

Subjects: Amusements, English (and England), Fairs, Heritage Activities, History, Japanese, Literature / Web Pages, Parks, Arabs, Europe, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Mrs. Paran Stevens

Mrs. Paran Stevens of Boston recently had $50,000 worth of jewels stolen from her in London, by a French maid.

[A very interesting article about her appears in the New York Times online index of April 4, 1895].
 

Subjects: Boston (MA), Crime, Criminals, Economics, English (and England), French, Literature / Web Pages, Rich People, Robbers and Outlaws, Widows and Widowers, Women, Work, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Swimming match

The great swimming match for $1000 a side and the championship of the world, between the English champion, Johnson, and the American, Coyle, came off Thurs. on the Delaware River between Chester, Pa. and Gloucester, N.J., and resulted in a victory for the Englishman, and may result in the death of Coyle.
 

Subjects: Contests, English (and England), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Sports, Stunt performers

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

James S. Grennell Esq. has for some months rented the front rooms on the third floor in the Franklin County Bank building, where he is collecting a very valuable library, [See an interesting article about this library in the New York Times online issue of March 7, 1915 under the name James S. Grinnell] consisting principally of books relating to both English and American patents, a more complete set than can be found elsewhere in New England. He is the possessor, also, of many rare and expensive books on agriculture. It is Mr. G's purpose at some time to take up his permanent residence in Greenfield, and establish a Patent Solicitor's office, his extensive experience in the patent office at Washington giving him unusual qualification for the business.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Economics, Emigration and Immigration, English (and England), Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Inventions, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Names, New England

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Heath

A heavy English table is still in good serviceable condition in the family of William Hunt, which is said to be over 200 years old.
 

Subjects: English (and England), Family, Furniture, History, Heath (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Foreign

A somewhat singular discovery has just been made at Buckingham Palace, London. During some alterations, and while the work men were engaged in pulling down a wall, a large quantity of valuable gold and silver plate, of about the time of George III, and supposed to be worth several thousand pounds, was discovered in a place of concealment.
 

Subjects: Economics, English (and England), Lost and Found, Work, Architecture / Construction, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure, Russia


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