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Sep 25, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Coal

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - A big peat bed, south of the depot, is being worked this season, and those interested think it may become as profitable as a coal mine.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Coal, Economics, Montague (MA), Natural Resources, Trains, Turners Falls (MA), Work

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

(Greenfield) The Sovereigns of Industry have ordered and received about 200 tons of coal
 

Subjects: Clubs, Coal, Greenfield (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 5, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A.N. Hull is selling Lehigh Coal cheap. See advertisement.


 

Subjects: Advertising, Coal, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Sales

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The location of the new depot still "hangs fire". It is the desire of the State authorities and Superintendent Heywood of the Fitchburg railroad to build a union depot west of the Connecticut River Railroad track at a point near the northern end of the present coal sheds. The track from the set here cuts through the bank at a depth of 20 ft., which would furnish considerable material for filling on the south side, and there would be room for extensive and well arranged depot grounds.

Another advantage would be better facilities for approaching from the traveled road. A driveway could lead from Main Street west of the culvert down a very easy grade to the depot, avoiding not only the present steep hill, but any necessity for crossing or getting upon the track. On the other hand, President Harris is of the opinion that the present depot, with slight alterations, perhaps, will answer all purposes, the State and the Fitchburg road renting their depot privilege from his road.

The Fitchburg road now pays the Connecticut River for rent $100 a month, and 55 percent of all the expenses, which the former naturally feels is a bit steep. It is to be hoped that the conflicting interests will harmonize, and that the more liberal policy of a union depot and better accommodations and facilities will be decided upon. The location of the road west of the depot has been decided upon from a point near the property belonging to the Methodist Society. The curvature between that place and the Connecticut River Railroad will depend upon the location of the depot.

The northern line surveyed, or the one nearest to Main Street, is the one so far adopted. We understand that there are numerous bids for contracts to build the road, and an effort is being made to have it built before the first of January. But it is probable a longer time will be required. Since the above was in type we learn that a new survey is being made and the exact line is still in doubt.
 

Subjects: Coal, Economics, Fires, Greenfield (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Religion, Roads, Trains, Transportation, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 11, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Amherst City

Perhaps there is not a village of Franklin County where the people are more enterprising, intelligent and united than the people of Amherst city, a village at the northern part of Amherst. Here are the great leather mills of the Cushmans, the paper mills of the Roberts, that give employment to most of the people of the place. "Uncle John" Cushman is the Nestor of the place. He has a beautiful and costly residence, one of the finest in the town of Amherst; and "Uncle John" is one of the best men the town can boast of.

He has a family of boys that are engaged with him in the leather mills, and they all work together in harmony, and with profit. Young John was a soldier in the war, and lost an arm in one of the first battles. Avery Cushman, the oldest son, is at the head of the concern, and the principal manager - an enterprising business man - Moses is a kind, noble-hearted, genial man that is a friend to everybody. Then there is Charley Dadmon, one of the employees, an intelligent, amiable man, who is always on hand for anything that will make people happy.

Well, last week the whole village met together for a "clam bake", and your correspondent had an invitation to be present. Up a little way east of Uncle John’s beautiful home, there is a shady, retired and pretty grove. Thither we all went for the bake. A fire was burning over a heap of stones, and we all heaped on brush to get them hot. By and by, they were all right.

We swept out the hot coals and ashes and piled on the oysters (not clams) and covered them over with green grass. A party came on from the village, with 2 or 3 pots of clam chowder. Soon our oysters were done, and the company seated around promiscuously in little squads, ate their clam chowder and baked oysters, with boiled eggs and small beer as a relish. Your correspondent was called on for a speech, and he made a short one, just as the sun went down, and bade the party "Good night".

[See Google Books "The Handbook of Amherst" by Frederick H. Hitchcock, 1891].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Astronomy, Beverages, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Coal, Family, Fires, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Households, Literature / Web Pages, Names, Rich People, Transportation, Trees, War / Weaponry, Words, Work

Posted by stew - Wed, Dec 10, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A.N. Hull has removed his coal office to the office of the express company.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Coal, Greenfield (MA), Mail, Transportation

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 8, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
News of the week

A current of terribly hot air passed over Centralia, Ill. recently, which drove workmen from the fields, and people rushed from their houses, supposing they were on fire. [ I don't know - coal mining since its incorporation as a town, a great disaster in the mines in 1947 when 111 miners died - and of course its counterpart in weirdness, Centralia, PA. Check it out at Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: Accidents, Astronomy, Coal, Curiosities and Wonders, Disasters, Fires, Households, Literature / Web Pages, Mines and Mineral Resources, Names, Weather, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 8, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
A snake in the coal bin

See the article in the July 5, 1875 New York Times about the wife and daughter of Henry Norton of East Berlin, CT.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Coal, Connecticut, Family, Literature / Web Pages

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A.N. Hull, who offered to give a ton of coal to the man who should make the best guess on the capacity of his big coal hod sign, closed the list of guesses on Sat. Homer R. Stratton is the lucky man; the hod holding 389 lbs. of coal, and Stratton guessing 390. There were 100 guesses, ranging from 75 lbs. to 630.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Art, Business Enterprises, Coal, Contests, Greenfield (MA), Luck

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A.N. Hull has been engaged the past week in filling the county coal bins. It takes 50 tons or more to make a beginning for the winter.
 

Subjects: Coal, Government, Greenfield (MA), Weather, Work

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
Brief notes of a pleasant excursion

The Massachusetts Press Association left Boston on the morning of June 23, for their annual excursion. The party, including ladies, numbered almost 90...On this excursion two first class cars and a smoking car on the Boston & Albany road were devoted to the exclusive use of the excursionists...The sandwiches, cakes, etc. were neatly packed in pasteboard boxes for each individual, and were liberally accompanied with iced lemonade.

At Albany...there was a change to the fine cars of the New York Central Railroad, and we were soon steaming with almost lightning rapidity through the beautiful Mohawk Valley. The flat farm lands here are of an unsurpassing fertility. There does not appear to be an acre that is not under cultivation....The Mohawk runs parallel with the road for many miles, and on the opposite side of the river is the Erie Canal. The latter, which has been one of the great institutions of the Empire State for many years, appears to New Englanders to be a rather slow method of transportation. The canal boats, which we pass in quick succession, seem hardly to move, so snail like is the progress which they make, but what is lost in time is saved in expense. If it was not for the Erie our coal and grain would never approach the present low prices, and upon it has depended largely the wealth and development of the great Western States.

But...the day was fearfully hot, and our excursion cars were in the rear of a very large train; and the dust and cinders that poured into the windows soon blackened our faces, filled our eyes and ears, so that when we reached Syracuse about 8 o’clock in the eve., after a ride of 350 miles, we were a sad looking set, more like a band of miners from the coal region, than people who patronized soap and water. We were, however, nicely quartered at the Globe and Vanderbilt hotels and through the transforming influences of the bath, clean linen, and a good supper, were soon ourselves again.

The party left Syracuse soon after 6 the next morning, by the Auburn branch of the New York Central. At Auburn we got the chance to see the extensive buildings of the State Penitentiary, but did not stop for a close inspection of the establishment. A short ride brought us to the wharf at Cayuga, where we embarked on a small steamer for a delightful trip of 38 miles through Cayuga Lake...

With song and mirth the happy excursionists were soon on the top wave of enjoyment. At Goodwin’s Point a landing was made and the party visited Taghkanic Falls To reach the Falls we climbed a steep descent of a mile, under a broiling sun, and were hardly, when we reached the summit, in the most favorable mood to fully appreciate this wild freak of nature. These falls are on a small stream, and 215 ft. in perpendicular height, while the rocky gorge is nearly 400 ft. down.

It is a wild and picturesque spot, but at this season there is not a large flow of water over the fall. A hotel has been built upon the summit, within a stone’s throw of the fall, and it is quite a resort for excursionists and picnic parties.... Afterwards we landed at the beautiful town of Ithaca, at the head of the lake. the principal business here is apparently the transferment of coal. The coal is brought by rail from the mines in Pennsylvania and transshipped to the canal boats, which convey it across the lake and thence through the canal to the Eastern markets. Our quarters were at the Ithaca Hotel, a first class house...After a sumptuous dinner, carriages were provided for a visit to Cornell University.

The college buildings occupy a beautiful site overlooking the lake, and can be seen miles away...The college was opened in 1868, and everything about the premises is neat and new...The founder of the college, Ezra Cornell, Esq. endowed the institution with more than three millions of dollars...Our party assembled in the Library of the college, and were addressed by President White...It was the purpose of Mr. Cornell to found a university where any person could find instruction in any study, and well has his purpose been carried out. It recognizes no distinct religious belief, though its aim is to promote Christian civilization...

Upon the grounds an opportunity is afforded, as at our Agricultural College, for the practical study of agriculture. There is a carpenter shop, furnished with power and machinery, where students who have tastes in that direction can cultivate their skill in wood work. A large machine shop is fitted with lathes and a variety of machinery and tools, and we found here a dozen or more young men hard at work with sleeves rolled up, dressed in colored shirts an overalls, hands and faces begrimmed, just like "greasy mechanics".

Several valuable inventions have been made in this shop, and much of this work is put to a practical use. In the same building is a printing shop with a large assortment of type and presses...Cornell University recognizes the co-education of the sexes. Young ladies are admitted on the same footing as young men, and are advanced through the same studies...the young men, who at other colleges have been accustomed to practices that were vulgar and demoralizing have voluntarily given them up since the admission of the young ladies, and so far from the mingling of the sexes leading to unpleasant talk and scandal, as some had predicted, not a breath of suspicion of anything out of character had ever existed...

Before leaving the college grounds we were driven to Fall Creek Gorge a wild, romantic locality, where the waters of a small stream leap and splash over the rocks of a wild ravine in its mad course to the lake below. We left Ithaca at 7 in the eve. over the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad, the President of which is Gen. W.I. Burt, the Postmaster of Boston. General Burt had accompanied our party, and we were indebted to his kind attention and influence for many courtesies. On this road we pass through Elmira, and about 10 o’clock at night, in the midst of a drenching rain, arrived at the town of Watkins at the head of Seneca Lake. After a little confusion we were provided with carriages and driven through the pitchlike darkness up the steep ascent to the Glen Mountain House [See the NYPL Digital Gallery for great photos], which has been erected above the famous Watkins Glen.

There is no natural wonder on the American continent, with the exception perhaps, of Niagara Falls, that surpasses the Glen...Says Bayard Taylor: "In all my travels I have never met with scenery more beautiful and romantic than that embraced in this wonderful Glen, and the most remarkable thing of all is that so much magnificence and grandeur should be found in a region where there are no ranges of mountains...It is only since 1869 that the Glen has been accessible to the public...[A very large section follows about the Glen and its hotels. To be continued next week].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Beverages, Boston (MA), Canals, Clubs, Coal, Cosmetics, Curiosities and Wonders, Economics, Education, Eye, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Greenfield (MA), Horses, Hotels, Ice, Inventions, Libraries and Librarians, Lightning, Mail, Massachusetts, Mines and Mineral Resources, Natural Resources

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
News of the week

A brutal affair occurred at Washington Sat. eve., John Cherry quarreled with his wife, and threw a lighted coal oil lamp at her head. It made an ugly wound, fracturing her skull, and to add to the horror, exploded, covering her person with the burning oil. The flames were speedily extinguished by neighbors who had been attracted by her cries, but not till her head and the upper part of her body had been terribly burned. There is little hope of her recovery. The husband is under arrest.
 

Subjects: Coal, Crime, Criminals, Fires, Light, Police, Wife Abuse, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 24, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A.N. Hull, the new coal dealer, offers to give a ton of coal to the customer who shall make the best guess as to the number of pounds of coal his big hod will contain. The hod is used as a sign in front of his office. Particulars of the offer are given elsewhere.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Coal, Contests, Greenfield (MA), Stores, Retail

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A.N. Hull's coal office in the Botsford block, has a very appropriate sign in the window - an immense coal hod.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Art, Coal, Glass / Windows, Greenfield (MA), Stores, Retail

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
News of the week

The outrages and brutalities of the striking miners in Pennsylvania threaten to totally suspend business at the mines, for the idlers will neither work themselves nor allow others to labor.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Coal, Economics, Mines and Mineral Resources, Strikes and Lockouts, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 10, 1875
News of the week

A riot occurred at the Moshannon mines, near Osceola, Clearfield County, Pa. Sat. and two officers were shot. There are no signs of yielding, yet, on the part of the miners or the operators, and the indications now are that the strike will last 3 or 4 months longer, at the least. [See the Coal Miners Memorial, Moshannon Mine at http:/

atheoldminer.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cammoshannon1.html ].
 

Subjects: Coal, Crime, Criminals, Economics, Mines and Mineral Resources, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Police, Strikes and Lockouts, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 10, 1875
News of the week

Benjamin A. Remick, a grocer on Washington Street, Boston, has been held in $10,000, pending an examination into the death of his father last week, whom he is charged with murdering during a quarrel about money affairs.
 

Subjects: Boston (MA), Coal, Criminals, Economics, Family, Food, Murder, Roads, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 10, 1875
News of the week

Mrs. Peters of Bennington, Vt. was awakened Sat. night by finding a man trying to steal some money from under her pillow; but she frightened him off before he got it, and in his haste he left one of his boots, which identified him as John Higgins, a former boarder of hers, and he is now in jail.
 

Subjects: Coal, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Cutlery, Dreams / Sleep, Furniture, Lost and Found, Names, Prisons, Robbers and Outlaws, Vermont, Women, Work, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 3, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A.N. Hull, the new coal dealer, advertises his business card in another column.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Coal, Greenfield (MA), Vendors and Purchasers

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 3, 1875
Conway

L.T. Brown, for several years superintendent for Tucker & Cook, has removed to Shelburne Falls and will engage in the coal business.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Coal, Conway (MA), Emigration and Immigration, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 26, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

D.C. Bartlett has sold out his coal business to A.J. Hull, a young man of Stockbridge. Mr. B goes back to Shelburne Falls.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Coal, Emigration and Immigration, Greenfield (MA), Massachusetts, Sales, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 19, 1875
News of the week

2000 of the striking miners employed in Wilkesbarre, Pa. have resumed work at reduced pay.
 

Subjects: Coal, Economics, Mines and Mineral Resources, Strikes and Lockouts, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

D.C. Bartlett advertises for sale his coal business. A good chance for a business man.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Coal, Greenfield (MA), Sales

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
Strike consequences

The New York Times says that it is estimated that the strike of the Pittsburgh puddlers, some 1000 in number, compelled the idleness of nearly 20,000 laborers, and produced a loss of the business of some $10,000,000. The strike in the coal mines along the Reading railroad is quite as remarkable for its disastrous effects...(An excellent overview of the Puddlers is available online "The battle for Homestead, 1880-1892: politics, culture, and steel" in Google books. I wasn't able to locate the particular article in the New York Times that this article mentions).
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Coal, Economics, Literature / Web Pages, Mines and Mineral Resources, Politics, Strikes and Lockouts, Trains, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
The number of men idle in the Pennsylvania coal mining regions is estimated at 63

The number of men idle in the Pennsylvania coal mining regions is estimated at 63,000....Long article.
 

Subjects: Coal, Mines and Mineral Resources, Strikes and Lockouts


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