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Mar 6, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Charlemont (MA)

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Marriages

Married in N. Amherst Sept. 13, Edward C. Hawkes of Charlemont to Mary P. Gaylord.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Marriage and Elopement

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 13, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Obituaries

Died in Charlemont Sept. 12, Judson Booth, age 71.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Obituaries

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Coleraine Murder

The Coleraine Murder - As briefly stated in our last issue, Daniel Dwight, supposed to be one of the murderers of Joseph R. Farnsworth, was arrested Sat. night at the door of his father’s house on Catamount Hill, Coleraine, where he had come 5 days after the murder. There were 6 men, under Deputy Sheriff John Gould, stationed around the house, and between 10 and 11 o’clock, they saw a man coming up the road, which proved to be young Dwight.

They allowed him to approach near the house, when a signal was given, and they stepped from their hiding places. Dwight ran around the house in the direction of the barn, but he was then surrounded and forced to surrender. When taken into the house before his father, he fainted.

Dwight was confined in the lock-up at Shelburne Falls, and on Mon., Trial Justice Brainard of Greenfield held a court at the office of H.M.Puffer, Esq., and had the young man brought before him. A large gathering of people were in attendance, and among them Dwight’s wife, father and mother.

He pleaded not guilty, and the magistrate, without having a hearing of evidence, arraigned him on the charge of murder and continued the case to Mon. the 17th. Officers Swan and Gould then brought the prisoner to Greenfield,where he is now confined in jail. Dwight appears quite calm and is not disposed to talk much about the affair. He accounts for his absence and his whereabouts during the 4 days as follows:

"I had some trouble with my wife on Tues. aft., which had ended by my saying I was going off, and her replying that she hoped I would, and what was more, that I would stay away. She then started to go to father’s house, which is only a short distance from mine, and I started for a pasture where some of father’s cattle were grazing.

On the way I met Herbert Davenport, and together we went to Farnsworth’s house, and afterward went down the lane to the road leading to Shelburne Falls. Herbert wanted a cane, so we stopped and cut one, I bending the tree over while he cut it; but he did not carry it long before he threw it away.

From there we went through the fields directly to my house, where I changed my clothes and gave a suit to Herbert, as his were all patched and dirty. We left home about 5 o’clock, and went down the mountain to Heath, and then through Hartwellville down to North Adams, getting there on Wed. aft.

We walked all Tues. night.Wed. night we slept on the hills near North Adams, and on Thurs. morning, after staying a while in North Adams, we walked to Pownal on the railroad track. At Pownal we got on board a train which was returning with the firemen from the muster at North Adams that day.

At Petersburg Junction Herbert got left with some Salem, N.Y. firemen, because the train started so quick, and I could not get off, it was going so fast. That night I stopped at Greenwich, N.Y. and registered my name in the hotel book in full - Daniel J. Dwight, Coleraine, Mass. I remained there that night, but had nothing to eat, as I only had money enough to pay for my lodging.

[For more information on this area, see the Internet Archive’s "Williamstown, the Berkshire Hills, and thereabout"]

The next day I walked to Troy. I did not remain there long because I was hungry and sick, and thought I would go right home and go to work for father, and let my wife do as she chose. Coming back I got a ride part of the way on a freight train, and got to N. Adams Sat. aft.,and walked to central shaft in the tunnel, and from there I rode to the east end on the workmen’s train and walked to Zoar, where they let me ride on a hand car to Charlemont. From there I rode with a Mr.Wells as far as his house, and then went across the fields home".



A portion of Dwight’s story has proved to be true. Bradley Davenport and Wesley Woodard, sent to Petersburg Junction, sent back that two men answering the description of Dwight and Davenport had been there. At Greenwich, N.Y., Dwight’s name was found registered in full, as he had said, and there is nothing to show that Davenport was with him at the time.

The Davenport boy arrested - Search was continued for Davenport and finally he was tracked to Williamstown, and Thurs. aft. was found there by a Mr. White. He made no efforts to escape, but on the other hand seemed glad to give himself up.

He was brought through the tunnel to Shelburne Falls Fri. morning, and Trial Justice Brainard of Greenfield held a preliminary trial, arraigned him for murder, and continued the trial until the 27th. The Davenport boy’s narrative is substantially the same as that given by Dwight, but he does not deny that they killed Farnsworth.

He says their only object was to obtain money, that he had no enmity or ill will towards the murdered man. He and Dwight had made up their minds to go West and hoped to get enough money from Farnsworth to pay their expenses, but he says they only got about $4.

There were 2 sticks cut, he says, a walnut and a maple. It was with the latter that Farnsworth was knocked down. He says that he did not do the striking, though he was there. After he was left at Petersburg Junction, he wandered from place to place, working for something to eat when he could get employment, and was endeavoring to get back home.

Davenport is not of ordinary intelligence. He was dull at school, and has since been lazy and shiftless. Want of mental responsibility will be entered as a plea in his behalf. His mother says that he has always been a "strange boy". She has another son and a daughter who are bright, active and industrious.

Davenport was brought to Greenfield and lodged in jail on Fri. by Deputy Sheriff Swan. Both boys, who are allowed to be together when not locked in their cells, do not appear to be cast down or afflicted much with remorse. They will be brought before the Grand Jury at the November Court and if bills are found against them the trial will be before a special session of the Supreme Court.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Diseases, Economics, Education, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Food, Greenfield (MA), Handicapped, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Hotels, Households, Juvenile Delinquents, Marriage and Elopement, Missing Persons, Murder, Names, Police

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Born

Born in Charlemont Sept. 3, a son, Forrest Linnell Streeter, to Moses Streeter and Martha R. Streeter and grandson to O.O. Elmer [Orric Otis Elmer] of Springfield.

http://listsearches....Y/2003-04/1050776044
 

Subjects: Births, Charlemont (MA), Family, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Names

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Married

Married in Charlemont on Sept. 7, Lyman Lillie of Pownal, Vt. to Nancy Littlejohn of Charlemont.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Marriage and Elopement, Vermont

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - Mon. Trial Justice John A. Winslow Esq. of Charlemont fined William O. Donahue for drunkenness, $2 and costs; Thomas Sharky for assault and battery upon David Smith, bookkeeper for James H. Edwards, $5 and costs. The complaint against Robert Maloney for disorderly conduct was nollo prosequied. The other two for want of money, went down to lodge and board with Sheriff Wells.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Drunkenness, Economics, Police, Prisons, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Charlemont

Charlemont - 99 1/100 of our citizens are justly indignant on account of the verdict rendered by the jury in the case of Mary Hillman vs. the Inhabitants of Charlemont. We understand that an effort will be made to procure a new trial.
 

Subjects: Accidents, Charlemont (MA), Courts, Economics, Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
The town of Rowe

(Rowe) It is well known among botanists that many notable plants grow on sterile soil, so from some of our small and sequestered country towns have come many of our now prominent and useful men. I well remember when a boy, of living in the town of Rowe 40 years ago, just how it appeared.

I was a poor farmer’s boy, at work on a farm for wages, at 12 dollars per month. I had been well schooled in the village schools of the time, but they said "there was to be a select school in the center of the town, to be taught by Mr. John Wells, a son of Hon. Noah Wells of Rowe, who had just graduated at Williamstown, taking the highest honors in his class".

John succeeded in getting a large class, made up of the young ladies and gentlemen of his native town. I was a pupil among the others, and here I wish to say that a more successful school was never taught by any man. John Wells was then a young man, tall, straight as an arrow, with a beautiful face, and an expression like a modest girl. At the close of the school, we had an exhibition in the old Unitarian Church. It was filled to overflowing, and all the scholars took a part. The whole thing was a great success for Mr. Wells and a credit to his pupils.

The succeeding winter I taught the "winter school" in the center of the town, having among my scholars a small boy, the son of Rev. William Stearns, named George Stearns. George was a bright, blue-eyed boy of about 10 years old, good, but very mischievous. I gave him his first lesson in Latin grammar. I well remember how he used to recite in such a way as to make fun for the other scholars.

Well, Mr. John Wells is now Hon. John Wells of the Supreme court; and little Georgie Stearns is the celebrated Springfield lawyer, one of the most eminent of his profession in the State. The following year I taught a school in the north west part of the town, in a little "hut of a school house", and among my scholars was a little boy by the name of Noah Cressy.

[See Google Books "American Law Review: 1875 - 1876" for a long biographical entry on John Wells].

[See Google Books "Second annual report on the diseases of the domestic animals in Connecticut" by Noah Cressy].

There were 3 brothers of the Cressy family living in the district, and their children constituted the greater part of the school. the following year I went away to study medicine, and lost sight of little Noah, and the next I heard of him he was "Professor Noah Cressy of the Massachusetts Agricultural college, and veterinary surgeon to the State of Connecticut".

A chum went with me from Rowe to study medicine in the same office with me, the office of Moses Barrett M.D., located in the town of Charlemont. Dr. Barrett was a native of Rowe and had studied medicine and graduated with high honors. My chum was C.K. Fiske of Rowe, who graduated with me at the Berkshire Medical college in 1842. Dr. Fiske became an eminent dentist and settled in St. Johns, New Brunswick.

The late Major Reed, sheriff of this county, was for a long time a merchant in Rowe, if not born there. He had a son by the name of Samuel Reed, a scholar in my school, who afterward studied medicine, graduated, started for California, and died on the passage.

I frequently meet Prof. Cressy. He is a wide awake, congenial, friendly man, but eminently learned in his profession. Last week we exchanged some books, I giving him Harris on Insects, and he giving me "The Elements of General and Pathological Anatomy" by David Craige, M.D., published in Edinburg in 1828.

On the fly leaf is this, written in pencil: "To Dr. Craige, belongs the merit of having written the first distinct and comprehensive work on general anatomy" signed George Gulliver, M.D. There is probably not more than one or two other works of the kind and edition in this country. David Rice, M.D.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Children, Connecticut, Courts, Diseases, Economics, Education, Emigration and Immigration, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, History, Insects, Jokes, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Medicine / Hospitals, Obituaries, Police, Poor

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Population

The population of Franklin county, as returned by the late census, and also that of 1865, is as follows:

Ashfield, 1188, 1875; 1221, 1865
Bernardston, 991, 1875; 902, 1865
Buckland, 1921, 1875; 1922, 1865
Charlemont, 1029, 1875; 994, 1865
Coleraine, 1699, 1875; 1726, 1865
Conway, 1452, 1875; 1538, 1865
Deerfield, 3414, 1875; 3038, 1865
Erving, 749, 1875; 576, 1865
Gill, 673, 1875; 635, 1865
Greenfield, 3540, 1875; 3211, 1865
Hawley, 588, 1875; 687, 1865
Heath, 545, 1875; 642, 1865
Leverett, 821, 1875; 914, 1865
Leyden, 521, 1875; 592, 1865
Montague, 3379, 1875; 1574, 1865
Monroe, 191, 1875; 190, 1865
New Salem, 923; 1116, 1865
Northfield, 1641, 1875; 1660, 1865
Orange, 2497, 1875; 1909, 1865
Rowe, 661, 1875; 563, 1865
Shelburne, 1586, 1875; 1564, 1865
Shutesbury, 558, 1875; 768, 1865
Sunderland, 845, 1875; 861, 1865
Warwick, 733, 1875; 901, 1865
Wendell, 503, 1875; 603, 1865
Whately, 545, 1875; 1012, 1865
 

Subjects: Ashfield (MA), Bernardston (MA), Buckland (MA), Charlemont (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Conway (MA), Deerfield (MA), Erving (MA), Gill (MA), Greenfield (MA), Leverett (MA), Montague (MA), New Salem (MA), Northfield (MA), Orange (MA), Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Shutesbury (MA), Sunderland (MA), Vital Statistics, Warwick (MA), Wendell (MA), Whately (MA), Leyden (MA), Heath (MA), Hawley (MA)

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Charlemont

(Charlemont) The new County Road near the depot, leading toward West Hawley, is fast being completed, but not in a manner satisfactory to the voters and tax payers or the traveling public. This road has been twice crowded from its first and excellent location by the change of the railroad bed. The last change now going on by the State, locates the road over a spur of Mt. Peck, making a cut through a ledge, which should have been cut away so as to leave a tolerable grade for the new road; but instead the grade has been increased very much, and the fill each way is made of material very liable to wash, making the expense for necessary repairs hereafter by the town very great, far in excess of what it would have been on the old route.

It is important that the town see to it that no such burden of future expense be cast upon them by the State, which is amply able to bear the expense of making good all highways upon which it encroaches, and any board of officers whose duty it is to decide upon the merits of this road, will do great injustice to the town if they accept of it completed or the State now decides upon. The town ask nothing but justice and will see to it that no great injustice is done the overtaxed town of Charlemont by the rich Commonwealth.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Economics, Government, Massachusetts, Rich People, Roads, Trains, Transportation, Work, Hawley (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Court record

The third week of the superior court was continued at 4 o’clock p.m. Mon., at which time the arguments were made on the town case of Joel R. Davenport vs. the Inhabitants of Coleraine, The accident, as alleged by the plaintiff in this action, occurred on the highway in the town of Coleraine, near the house of Arthur A. Smith, in Feb. 1873. At the time named, the ground was covered by a heavy body of snow, and on the day of the alleged injury, was thawing. The plaintiff was drawing wood, and had on his sled at the time, 180 ft. of green wood - a very heavy load.

The plaintiff says he was sitting upon the load of wood, driving with due care, and by reason of a defect in the highway - which consisted of a deep "cradle hole", and also a sidling condition of the road - his load was overturned, falling upon and injuring him. To this the town replied that the plaintiff was not using due care, and in fact he did not receive the alleged injury claimed, in the manner as stated.

Two boys, who saw the occurrence, testified that the plaintiff stopped his team, and after examining the load, stepped upon the rave of the sled, and turned to the right and started up, upon which his load was overturned. To another party, who came up shortly after, the plaintiff stated that he was not hurt. The testimony of other witnesses, who examined the track of the runner in the snow, went to show that the boys’ story was true, and that the plaintiff was mistaken in keeping the road, and his getting off the hard track and his endeavor to drive back into it, occasioned the overturn.

The defense also argued that the plaintiff had no claim against the town, and never thought of such a thing himself for over a year after the accident; and in proof of this theory, they showed that the plaintiff said, some time ago, he should have to ask the town for pay for his sled stakes; and again, about a year after, he made a demand on the Selectmen for $100, for injury to his chest or side, while his claim now was for injury to his leg or hip.

The court ruled that unless the defect was the sole cause of the accident, the town was not liable. Verdict for the defendants. S.T. Field for pl’ff.; D. Aiken for defense.

Lyman J. Wait vs. Justin Thayer et al. - This action was brought to recover the payment of a promissory note held by the plaintiff of Greenfield, dated Nov. 1, 1872, for $1000, and signed by S.F. Warner, with the endorsement of Thayer, Sargent & Co. of Northampton. The real defendant, however, in the present action being Gen. Luke Lyman of the latter town, who, as well as Warner, composed the company of the endorsing firm...The whole case was narrowed to the single question of the circumstances under which the note was taken; it being conceded by all parties that the proceeds were used for Warner’s private benefit...Verdict for plaintiff, amount $1281.67...

Mary M. Hillman vs. the Inhabitants of Charlemont - This was an action of tort for injuries received on the highway leading from Heath Center, to what is known as the old center of the town of Charlemont, and occurred Aug. 14, 1874. The injury was received by the horse running away, and the plaintiff being thrown from the wagon, at a steep and rocky portion of the road. The injury in this case was real, the fact not being questioned by the town, and no evidence was needed of severity or permanency, the only fact to be tried was as to the liability of the town.

The plaintiff of course, made the usual allegations of want of repair or defects in the highway, and the due care used by her; while the defendants rested their case on the grounds - first, that the road was safe and convenient; second, want of due care; and third, loss of control and the vicious habits of the horse...The jury evidently came to the conclusion that the town was liable, and being liable, gave a verdict to the full amount asked. ..

The large damages given occasioned general surprise, however, from the fact that the plaintiff was understood to be willing to settle with the town before the trial for $1500. The amount will be quite an item in the future taxes of Charlemont, already very heavy (some 3%), while to these must be added a large sum on a new bridge for which the town is to pay. The present verdict is for $5000, to which heavy cost must also be added...

The following cases were disposed of without trial: Simon L. Shattuck et al. vs. John Haggerty - Judgment for plaintiff, amount $114. Frank T. Swan vs. Charles L. Sawyer et al. - Judgment on award of referees, for plaintiff; amount $1720. L. Johnson vs. Harding G. Woodard - Discontinued and settled out of court. Henry C. Willard et al. vs. Elijah Stratton - Judgment for plaintiff, amount $88. James Newton vs. Walter A. Lee - Judgment for plaintiff, amount $217.

Parker Wise et al. vs. David W. Goss - Judgment for plaintiff, amount $60. Solomon O. Poole vs. Solomon Poole - Discontinued and settled out of court. Mary Joslyn vs. William B. Templeton, app’t. - Discontinued and settled out of court. Hezekiah Andrews vs. George P. Stearns - Action dismissed. Rodney Hunt Machine Co. vs. Rodney Hunt et als. - Judgment on award of referee.

The case of Chandler A. Vincent vs. the Inhabitants of Rowe has been on trial during the last two days of the week, and will be given to the jury today. The action is one of contract, to recover for building a road in said town. The plaintiff claims that he took the piece of road to build, according to certain conditions as to time, etc.; that he performed his part of the contract and now wants his pay therefor. The town deny the claim, alleging that the conditions were not complied with, by which a good winter road was to be made by a certain date, and the same afterward completed for acceptance by another fixed date...

The contract was all oral, and it required a large number of witnesses to ascertain what it was, and whether it had been executed to the satisfaction of all people living in that vicinity. The only remaining cases are those of Edward A. Robbins vs. John T. Fitch et al.; and John Butterworth vs. S.W. Hall et al. and Trustee; but the trials to be had before the Judge will take the most of the week. The term will be the largest for years.
 

Subjects: Accidents, Animals / Reptiles, Bridges, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Charlemont (MA), Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Economics, Government, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Horses, Households, Law and Lawyers, Orange (MA), Roads, Transportation, Trees, Weather, Women, Work, Heath (MA), Rowe (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 17, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Court record

The second week of the Superior Court was opened at 10 o’clock Mon. The jury in the case of Peleg Adams vs. John Single, and the countersuit of Single vs. Adams, brought in a verdict on each action separately, viz.: In the former for Adams, amount $522; and in the latter for Single, $808, giving a difference in Single’s favor of $286.

The criminal cases were then taken up before the second jury as follows: Timothy Sullivan of Greenfield, on two indictments for larceny. The transaction itself was so lately chronicled that it is unnecessary to repeat it here, but simply to state that the defendant is the party who carried off Conductor Tharp’s clothing, and A.N. Hull’s shoes from the Mansion House. He was found guilty and sentenced to two years at the State Prison at Charlestown; two days solitary. District Attorney for Commonwealth.

Patrick Fraine of Charlemont was tried on two indictments. One for arson and another for larceny from the building, both being tried at the same time. The first charge was for the alleged firing of the Zoar depot last March, and the second for stealing from the same. The defendant worked upon the railroad at the Tunnel and boarded at Zoar. The parties with whom he boarded testified that Fraine came home the night of the fire at 5 minutes before 9, and the alarm was given about half past 9.

The defendant, who had no council, cross questioned the witnesses with considerable shrewdness, and brought out from the depot master the fact that some railroad men were in the depot during the eve; the west end of which was used as a store, and that there was a large fire in the stove, so much that some of the party complained of the heat, but it was claimed that the fire was out, or nearly so, when the store was closed.

The party who lived near, and who seemed to have discovered the fire first, described it as wholly confined to the southwest end, or store part, and there seemed to be no fire in the rest of the building. The evidence seemed very small to hold the defendant on the charge of arson, and the verdict of the jury acquitted the prisoner at the bar therefor.

On the allegation of larceny, the evidence was more conclusive, two witnesses testifying to the defendant having pennies and 5 cent pieces in his pockets, some being in a pocket handkerchief and others done up in a pair of stockings in the defendant’s coat at the place he boarded. On this charge he was found guilty and sentenced to 2 years in the House of Correction at Pittsfield. District Attorney for Commonwealth.

Marshall H. Porter of Williamstown and Henry Smith of South Deerfield, for larceny, and the former also for receiving stolen goods. The defendant, Porter, a dark mulatto, who gave his age as 30, said he was visiting at South Deerfield. He claimed to have had nothing to do with the larceny, but said the articles found on him were given him by Henry Moore, although he acknowledged he knew they were stolen.

It appeared by the confession of Smith, who is a bright colored boy of about 16 years of age, that the larceny alleged consisted in entering the store in the building connected with the Bloody Brook House at South Deerfield; the boy Smith watching in the shade of a large elm tree in front of the store, while Porter and Moore entered the store by the bulk-head and did the stealing. The articles taken were 2 or 3 watches, a revolver, candy, some currency and silver coin and other miscellaneous items.

Henry Moore, indicted with the others for the larceny, was bailed by his father, an was not on hand to be tried with the others. Porter and Smith were found guilty and sentenced each to 3 years at the House of Correction in Pittsfield; District Attorney for Commonwealth, A. Brainard for Smith. A bench warrant was issued for the arrest of Henry Moore, who has become scarce in this region since the time he was required at this court to plead with the others to the alleged burglary.

George Doolittle of Greenfield, for assault and battery. The present case came up on an appeal from sentence of the magistrate. The said assault and battery was made upon H.E. Keuran, while visiting the Mansion House, the defendant being keeper of the hotel. The case was virtually decided on the testimony of Doolittle himself, who, after detailing the fact of seeing Keuran passing back and forth through the bar room to the wash room, had ordered Keuran to leave and not be hanging around there, to which the reply was made that he had as much money in there as the defendant, and should go when he got ready, at same time drawing a pocket knife and threatening bodily harm if he was put out; upon which the defendant struck him with his fist, and as he was going out struck him two more blows.

The fact of any knife being drawn was denied by Keuran, who also said he had no such knife as described with him at the time. Several witnesses detailed the facts as they saw them, several testifying they saw a knife in Keuran’s hand, but the court ruled that even if there was any justification for the first blow self defense did not require the others, and according to the defendant’s own testimony, the said blows were given when Keuran was getting away about as fast as he could. Verdict of guilty. Sentence deferred. District Attorney for Commonwealth, A. DeWolf for defendant.

The case of Michael Moran for larceny came up on appeal from a magistrate’s trail, and on motion the complaint was quashed for informality. D. Aiken for defendant.
u
Frank P. Bell of Coleraine for assalt and battery had a lengthy trial occupying the most of Thurs. The alleged assault was made with a shovel upon George H. Phillips, one of the Selectmen of the Town, and also another assault upon Newton G. Lake, who was with him at the time. The defendant has not lived very peaceably with certain of his neighbors for some time, and probably dates back to the adultery case of a few years ago, at which the present defendant was one of the parties.

The present difficulty seems to have arisen about one Joshua Fairbanks, a town pauper, at the time living at Bell’s house. Mr. Phillips testified that he went to the defendant’s house, either to get Fairbanks or to notify defendant that the town would not pay for his support. Upon which the defendant ordered them away, using abusive language, and that afterward he came out armed with a shovel and not only assaulted them with his fist, but struck at them with his shovel, and finally thrust the shovel against Mr. Phillips, knocking him down.

All this the defendant denied. The jury, however, found the "Christian Hill" defendant guilty. when the time for sentencing arrived, Bell had departed, he having been on bail since his preliminary trial before the magistrate. His bail was called and defaulted, and a bench warrant issued for his arrest. District Attorney for Commmonwealth, C.C. Conant for defendant. This closed the criminal cases and the civil list was resumed with.

Joseph H. Hollister vs. Quincy Mutual Fire Insurance Co. In this case the plaintiff claims a sum due him on a policy in said company. The company, however, defend, alleging that the plaintiff has no claim on them, as he had failed to pay an assessment made in the required time, and his policy had consequently lapsed to the company. The court ordered the jury to return a verdict for the defendant, upon the law involved on an agreed statement of facts, and the case goes at once to the Supreme Court on the questions of law. C.C. Conant for plaintiff, D. Aiken for defendant.

Edward E. Coleman et al. vs. Loren S. Bartlett et al. - This was an action of contract for the recovery of the price of a turbine water wheel, made by E.E. Coleman & Co. of Shelburne Falls, for Loren S. Bartlett & Son of Northampton - the value of the wheel, worksetting the same and interest, amounting to $567.

The wheel in question was put into the mill some 2 years ago, and the contract therefor, the defendants allege, was that the plaintiffs agreed to put in the said wheel and to warrant it to work to the satisfaction of the defendants; that it should use less water and give more power than the wheel they were then using; but after trying the wheel for some time, with the same water as on the old wheel, found they got less power and could not operate the mill; and that on notice given of these facts to the defendants, they endeavored to remedy the defects, but still it did not work to their satisfaction, and they therefore refused to pay for the same.

The case was very thoroughly heard and a great amount of evidence introduced to show the conditions under which wheels are usually put into mills, the nature of turbine wheels in general, and much other matter relative thereto - of interest, perhaps to mill owners, or to the relative value of turbines and the conditions necessary to their successful working; but as a whole, the general interest in the case was not so great as in many others. Verdict for defendants. S.T. Field for plffs.; DW. Bond & H.H. Bond for defts.

Lyman J. Wait vs. Justin Thayer et al. - This case was partially presented to the jury, but was suspended to enable counsel to go to Brattleboro to take the deposition of S.F. Warner. The action is on a promissory note of $1000, given by Warner and endorsed by Thayer, Sargent & Co.of Northampton, Mr. Warner being at the time a member of the above named firm. The case attracts considerable attention on account of several nice points of commercial law involved.

While waiting for the taking of the deposition mentioned, the case of Joel R. Davenport vs. the inhabitants of Coleraine was taken up before the same jury. This action is for injury alleged to have been received by the plaintiff while traveling on the highway in said town. The case is still on trial.

The cases of Mary M. Hillman vs. The Inhabitants of Charlemont, and that of Chandler A. Vincent vs. The Inhabitants of Rowe stand next in order of trial. It will probably take the most of the present week to finish up the cases still standing for trial.
 

Subjects: Accidents, African-Americans / Blacks, Bars (Drinking establishments), Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Charlemont (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Family, Fires, Food, Government, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Hotels, Massachusetts, Missing Persons, Poor, Prisons, Racism, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Premium list

Premium list for the 5th annual cattle show and fair at Charlemont, Mass., Sept. 23 and 24, 1875. [Very long article].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Contests, Fairs

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Born

Born in East Charlemont Aug. 4, a daughter (Bertha May Nichols), to George P. Nichols and Eunice E. Nichols; Aug. 7, a daughter to Joseph Packard and Anna Packard.
 

Subjects: Births, Charlemont (MA), Names

Posted by stew - Wed, Jan 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Court record

The annual Aug. term of the Superior court was begun Thurs., Judge P. Emory Aldrich or Worcester presiding. The court was opened by prayer by Rev. Dr. Samuel Hollingsworth, at 10 o'clock a.m. The Grand Jury were called and sent out to attend to their duties, and the trial list called off as usual. Before the opening of the court, a meeting of the Franklin County Bar was held, and suitable action taken for meeting with the Hampshire Bar in being represented at the funeral of Ithamar F. Conkey, Esq., of Amherst, which took place Wed. Mr. Conkey was well and favorably known in this vicinity, and holding the office of U.S. Register in Bankruptcy, was very frequently at Greenfield to hold court in bankruptcy proceedings.

The following traverse jurors were duly empaneled for the term...The following bills of indictment were reported by the Grand Jury: Against Marshall D. Porter, Henry Moore and Henry Smith of Deerfield, for larceny; Patrick Frain of Charlemont, two bills, one for arson, and one for larceny from building; M.H. Porter. for receiving stolen goods; William Taylor of Deerfield, for larceny from person; Frank P. Bell of Coleraine for assault; Timothy Sullivan of Greenfield for larceny.

The following cases were then put on trial: Simon L. Shattuck et al vs. George W. Jones - This was an account of contract, on an account annexed, which ran back to 1872...The jury, after being out 5 hours, returned a verdict for the plaintiff, amount, $212.50.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Clubs, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Fires, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Law and Lawyers, Massachusetts, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Religion, Robbers and Outlaws

Posted by stew - Tue, Jan 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
An old subscriber

Allen Barnard of Charlemont paid his 60th subscription in our paper last week. He is in his 86th year, and is yet hale and hearty. He helped build the building now occupied by the Gazette & Courier. It was built in 1813, and was the first brick and slated roof building built in town. Zebina Billings of Greenfield had the contract for the brick work, and Timothy Billings of South Deerfield the contract for the wood work. Mr. Barnard, who was a carpenter and joiner, worked for $17 a month and board, showing some difference in the prices then paid and those paid at the present day for carpenter work. But two men are now living in the village who were here at that time, Judge Grennell and John J. Pierce.
 

Subjects: Businesspeople, Charlemont (MA), Deerfield (MA), Economics, Greenfield (MA), History, Literature / Web Pages, Old Age, Trees, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 30, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Probate Court record

Greenfield, Aug. 3, 187 - Administration granted - on estate of Anna P. Alexander, late of Northfield, H. Alexander, Jr. of Springfield, Adm’r; Charles S. Brown, Greenfield, John J. Graves, Adm’r. de bonis non; Rufus S. Phillips, Greenfield, Sally Phillips and John P. Griswold of Greenfield, Adm’r.; Asa S. Ruddock, Buckland, Lee Baron D. Ruddock of Buckland, Adm’r.; Willard Ward, Orange; Asa A. Ward of Orange, Adm’r.

Wills proved - Martha S. Johnson, Coleraine, Morris Pierce of Coleraine, Ex’r.; Lyman Dickinson, Whately, Lyman M. Dickinson and Dennis Dickinson, Adm’rs. with will annexed; Baxter Harding, Conway, Mattie J. Harding of Conway, Ex’r.

Guardians appointed - Dennis Wilson, Coleraine, over Jennie V. Newell of Coleraine.

Accounts rendered - On estates of Philinda Bowman of Leverett, Chester Hinsdale of Monroe, Edward Jones of Leverett, Barnard Fisher of Warwick.

License granted - To sell real estate of Moses M. Huse of Leverett, Charles Pelton of Shelburne. Widow’s allowance - made in estate of Benjamin Tilton of Deerfield, $200.

Inventories filed - In estate of Hubert Morton, Shelburne, $872.78; Lyman Rice, Charlemont, $3129; Samuel R. Smith, Coleraine, $2658; Dexter Drake, Buckland, $18,051; Esther Dickinson, Deerfield, $72,271; Henry M. Fisk, Shelburne, $9858; Eli T. Green, Shelburne, $17,407.

Affidavits filed - In estate of Rebecca L. Burrows of Bernardston, George Childs of Leyden. Commissioners appointed - On insolvent estates of Charles S. Brown, Greenfield, R.A. Packard, R.W. Cook, Jonathan H. Cary, New Salem, R.D. Chase, Hiram Orcutt; Robert Richardson, Greenfield, Charles L. Lowell, F.G. Fessenden. Next Probate Court at Greenfield on the 1st Tues. of Sept.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Buckland (MA), Charlemont (MA), Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Conway (MA), Courts, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Family, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Law and Lawyers, Leverett (MA), Mourning Customs, New Salem (MA), Northfield (MA), Orange (MA), Orphans and Orphanages, Sales, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Warwick (MA), Whately (MA), Widows and Widowers, Leyden (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 21, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Died

Rogers, Emma, daughter of the late Oren H. Rogers, formerly of Charlemont, died in Troy, N.Y. on July 23. She was for many years a teacher in that city. Loved and respected by all who knew her, she leaves a large circle of friends to mourn her loss.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Education, Emigration and Immigration, Obituaries, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 21, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Married

In Charlemont, Alonzo M. Wilson of Rowe to Lizzie Hawke of C.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Marriage and Elopement, Rowe (MA)

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 18, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Those good deacons

[A short article about deacons of Heath, Charlemont, Hawley, Ashfield, Shelburne, Deerfield and Bernardston, who have recently gone on to their final resting places].
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Charlemont (MA), Deerfield (MA), Obituaries, Religion, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Heath (MA), Hawley (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Died

Allen, Ella MIranda, age 24, wife of Dwight Allen and daughter of J.L. Briggs, died in Charlemont on July 22.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Obituaries

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Shelburne Falls

The Edwards Brothers have finally decided to set up the steam shovel again in Charlemont, where there is a heavy cut to be made, and it is now being taken down preparatory to moving. It will take a week to get it running again.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Charlemont (MA), Family, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 14, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Charlemont

E.E. Warfield has opened his new dwelling to city boarders, receiving his first installment of boarders from Boston on Sat., and still has room for a few more. When such families open their doors it makes us wish we were a city boarder that we might enjoy the beautiful prospect from the mountain side and sit at the well furnished table, and last but not least, see the little ones quaff the sweet, pure milk from his herd of splendid cows that graze upon the hillside.

[Incredibly this farm, in the same location, still exists as a popular working farm bed & breakfast! It is called the Warfield House Inn at Valley View Farm. Started in 1868, and still owned and operated by the same family, and still having the most magnificent views around! http://archiver.root...Y/2003-01/1043125120 ].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Beverages, Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Charlemont (MA), Children, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Furniture, History, Hotels, Households, Literature / Web Pages, Urbanization / Cities, Vacations

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 14, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Charlemont

Uzziel Bisbee has repaired his dwelling inside and out, and has now one of the best in the village.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Households, Names, Work

Posted by stew - Fri, Dec 12, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
East Charlemont

L.B, Wells is sick and confined to his bed with inflammatory rheumatism, said to be the effects of diphtheria.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Diseases, Furniture


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