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Sep 19, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Charity

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The Brass Band makes a very fine appearance in their new uniform. They render their hearty thanks to their generous friends for their assistance.


 

Subjects: Amusements, Charity, Music, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Clothing

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Catamount Hill Reunion



Catamount Hill Reunion - The sun never shone upon a jollier band than was gathered on Catamount HiIl at the Reunion on Sept. 1. The day was all that could be expected, and everyone seemed to partake of its joyousness. The company from Adams, together with a delegation from the west, preluded the occasion by riding though the Hoosac Tunnel and viewing the wonderful work thereof.

Then on up the mountain they went, stopping ever and anon to hear an old time story, from Paul, Henry, or Chauncey, and maybe from the Dr., to say nothing of the Professor from the Hub. At the old school house they halted, and the story of whipping out the muster was triumphantly related.

When they reached the picnic ground, such a hurra of welcome as came from the Catamount Hill boys, one could hardly imagine, but it made the old hills ring, and the rocks their silence seemed to break, for "Uncle Bill’s" enthusiasm was fearfully contagious.

But to the programme first, reading of the 90th psalm from Mr. Benjamin Farley’s old family Bible; then prayer from one of the old time residents, after which "Coronation" was sung and the chronological history read by Dr. A.. Davenport (a copy of which appears in this paper).

Family histories were also read by Miss Emma Farley and Miss Nellie Ives beautifully worded and well worthy of print would space be allotted. "The Old Oaken Bucket" with appropriate remarks by Mr. David Cary were listened to with interest.

http://www.scituateh...tes_oakenbucket.html

Then too, the picnic part of the programme must not escape mention, which was basket in every sense of the word - a group here, another here, and so all around the rocks and ledges were seated, the happy families partaking of the good things brought to sustain the inner man.

And last, but not least, the miscellaneous, of which there is not room to speak in detail; reminiscences of bygone years.

"And jokes that cracked a bit (etc.)
One did, perchance,call forth the tears
The other shouts and cheers (etc.)"

Then there were notes from C.J. Davenport and Levi Davenport; poems from "Q in the Corner"; and "Mrs. M.D."; speeches from many, etc. too numerous to mention. In short, many appropriate and spicy things were said; one was "Once I was young, but now I am old; never have I seen a Catamounter forsaken or his seed begging bread". [Kind of ironic considering the murder that would take place there a week later]. Estimated number present, 700.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Astronomy, Boston (MA), Charity, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Education, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Food, History, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Jokes, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Murder, Music, Noise, Old Age, Parties, Religion, Trains, Women, Words, Berkshire County (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 16, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Mr. Beecher and Lake Pleasant



Mr. Beecher and Lake Pleasant - Your correspondent, induced by feelings of regret at Mr. Beecher’s announced visit to Lake Pleasant, called upon him during the week, at his summer home, the Twin Mountain House, and by a personal interview learned that your article of last week did him great injustice. Having a letter signed by all the clergy of this immediate vicinity, I found ready access to Mr. Beecher, though he must be often annoyed by visitors who, from their position, have more claim upon his attention than I. Further, the letter expressing, as it did, the Christian sentiment of this vicinity, found a quick response in Mr. Beecher’s heart, and a long conference revealed the following facts which are quite in antagonism to those published by you last week.



First - that Mr. Beecher was led to feel, that by a visit to Lake Pleasant, he would confer a favor upon his numerous friends in all this region - that there were many to whom it would be a lifelong pleasure to have once listened to him, so he should declare the Gospel unto them. Among the recent gatherings at Lake Pleasant, and their gala day character he knew nothing. When he learned that these gatherings in the past, had predjudiced [i.e. prejudiced] the Christian mind against a similar meeting there under similar conditions, though it should be in the interests of the Gospel, Mr. Beecher with true nobility of soul replied "In all matters where my own conscience will not be violated I defer most heartily and readily to the convictions of my ministerial brethren, and shall do in this".

Second - that as far as Mr. Beecher was concerned, there was no "stroke of business" at all to the arrangement. The inference in your article, that it was the compensation offered that had led him to accept the invitation to speak at Lake Pleasant, needs correction and emphatic denial.



In the course of the arrangements when compensation was spoken of, Mr. Beecher replied that "he had never taken a penny for outside work, save for his lectures, never a penny for charity addresses, never a penny for sermons preached during his vacation, never a penny for campaigning in support of political doctrines, as he did in 1856 when he made 3 addresses a week, sometimes of 3 hours each in the open air, during which campaign he even insisted upon paying his own expenses, that he might be above all criticism"; and then in substance added, I shall not accept anything for this service more than careful provision for my personal comfort.

Later, an excursion to the Tunnel having been proposed in connection with his stay here, he declined even this, in part because it would have the appearance of being a return for services rendered. It would seem therefore that the only parties interested in this as a worldly matter of dollars and cents are the railroads; and it is certain it was not from love to any of these, nor from a desire to fill their purses that led Mr. Beecher into this arrangement, but other motives, pure and noble, influenced him.

As to Mr. Beecher’s views concerning the sanctity of the Sabbath and the way in which it should be observed, I need say nothing, as last Sabbath in the course of a reply to certain criticisms upon his course that had appeared in the Vermont Chronicle, he announced that he should soon engage in the discussion of the Sabbath question.

I believe however, that he differs not so much from many of us in relation to Sabbath observance in our rural districts. He affirms that he is not settled about excursion trains in general, but when the possibility of his speaking in Greenfield on the 19th was referred to, his answering question was "How can you stop the trains?"

Whatever his view may be, it is certain that he is unwilling to violate the consciences of his brethren, if he can yield to them without violating his humor. Withal, I am convinced that Mr. Beecher in the matter referred to in your article last week, is deserving of no censure from the Christian public, but rather is worthy of imitation by them in the frankness in which he considered and recognized the judgment of those whom he felt to be better qualified than himself to judge, because of their better knowledge of fact involved; and also worthy of imitation in the promptness with which he acted in the matter.

The criticisms that have been so freely passed by many of us upon Mr. Beecher’s connection with the affair, have been criticisms of a misinformed man and hence Christian courtesy demands that we recall them. But while we draw the arrows let us apply as well the balm to heal. F.A. Warfield.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Business Enterprises, Charity, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Hotels, Lake Pleasant (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), New Hampshire, Politics, Religion, Trains, Vacations, Vermont, War / Weaponry, Words

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 13, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Greenfield - George Woodard, the boy brought before Judge Conant for stealing a gun and powder horn, was on Wed. turned over to Gordon M. Fisk, the agent of the Board of State Charities, who has placed him in the State Primary School at Monson.
 

Subjects: Charity, Children, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Education, Greenfield (MA), Juvenile Delinquents, Massachusetts, Robbers and Outlaws

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
The horrors of idolatry

The horrors of idolatry - Miss Harriet Brittan is writing some interesting letters depicting life in India, to the "Christian at Work". From a recent one we make the following extract in which she describes a religious gathering: "And now to turn to a sad sight witnessed during my visit to Allahabad...".

[Long article discusses diseased beggars, religious pilgrims who come once a year to bathe and shave at this spot. She describes one street "which appeared to be entirely devoted to fakirs...men who are supposed by self-inflicted tortures to have become very holy...They were about the vilest creatures that it is possible to describe; it made you shudder to think that humanity could be so degraded...These men were almost all of them almost entirely nude - none of them had any covering but one filthy little piece of rag, not more than a fig leaf...

Their hair and beards were all long and matted with filth, their bodies smeared with a mixture of cow dung and ashes; some of them had a thick mixture of whitewash or white plaster, with 1, 2 or 3 broad stripes, like, blood, down the forehead...One man...sat in a bed of ashes, with 4 fires built around him on either side; not of course close enough to burn him, but close enough to scorch him and cause great suffering...

There was another, a miserable looking creature, who for many years had held his arms up over his head with his hands crossed. At first when he began to do this, he was obliged to have his hands bound to poles, to keep them up until they stiffened in that position...

[Check out Fakir in Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Barber / Hair, Charity, Cults, Diseases, Fires, Food, Garbage, Literature / Web Pages, Magic and Magicians, Outhouses, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Women, Stunt performers, Geography, Clothing, Water

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Buckland

(Buckland) Forest Cranson and his wife earnestly and sincerely render warm thanks to their neighbors and friends for procuring them another cow in place of the one that died, also for other kindnesses shown them in her sickness. We are glad to see aged people remembered.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Buckland (MA), Charity, Diseases, Old Age

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Coleraine

(Coleraine) As was feared, J.M. Townsend, the faithful stage driver, has passed away. He died Sun. morning. He will be missed by all, especially by his invalid wife and daughter. We commend them to the sympathy of the community.
 

Subjects: Charity, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Diseases, Family, Handicapped, Obituaries, Transportation, Work

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Coleraine

A tramp called at the residence of one of our generous hearted citizens the other day, and after being fed and kept over night left early in the morning, carrying off our friend's best suit of clothes. Look out for them - we mean the tramps!
 

Subjects: Charity, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Crime, Criminals, Food, Households, Robbers and Outlaws, Tramps, Clothing

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A number of young people who have given the symphony concerts in Deerfield that have attracted so much attention, were induced by some ladies of Greenfield to favor a few of our people with the entertainment at the Parlor of the Unitarian Church on Thurs. eve. The audience completely filled the room and are rapturous in their praise of the novel concert. The musicians were under the direction of Miss Lincoln and performed upon a curious medley of instruments. The programme included a fine recitation by one of the young ladies. There is an earnest wish that the entertainment may be repeated here. The proceeds of the concert were given to a family in needy circumstances.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Charity, Deerfield (MA), Family, Greenfield (MA), Music, Poor, Religion, Women

Posted by stew - Tue, Jan 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Bernardston



The Bernardston Annual Union picnic, a fund for which was provided a few years ago by a munificent gentleman of New York, for the benefit of all the different Sunday schools in town, was held on Wed the 11th. The weather was favorable, the gathering of old and young quite large - between 500 and 600. The festive board was spread to profusion with every delicacy that could charm the eye or gratify the appetite, a power to charm peculiar to the Bernardston ladies, whose success in this direction cannot be outdone by anyone or ones of the feminine persuasion.

A blessing was prayed by Rev. Mr. Holmes of the Universalist society, after which the festival commenced very soon. Everything seemed to pass off quietly and joyously, and to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. A procession was formed in the morning at the town hall, under the direction of Lieut. E.S. Hulbert, and marched to the Grove escorted by the Bernardston Cornet Band, making a splendid appearance in their new uniforms. They also discoursed some sweet music at intervals through the day which added much pleasure to the occasion. This Band now numbers 21 pieces.

There was no public speaking by anyone through the day - no discussion of religious tenets or politics, but all such topics were given up for the full enjoyment of the Sunday school youth in their own innocent gayeties and childish amusements. This course was wisely suggested by Mr. Hale of New York, the generous donor to these Sunday schools, and this year it has been as wisely carried out.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Bernardston (MA), Charity, Children, Economics, Food, Music, Old Age, Politics, Religion, Weather, Women

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 2, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Conway

Visiting our cemetery the other eve., we were greatly impressed from the many new graves within a year. The past season has been sad, very sad to us. Who has not wept o’er some loved one fallen? Pure white tablets, monumental shafts, marble slabs, how thickly we are marking here and there o’er our new made graves. Beautiful flowers, wreaths, yet watered with bitter tears speaks to the soul of grief not simulated but sincere. One of the most tastefully decorated here is the work of Mrs. Chandler Field; her husband and child’s grave with other members of the household lying in the neatly laid out, and well cared for elegant home lot.

At one end is the grave of their bound boy taken from the Monson Almshouse http://www.hampdenco...nson/everts/033.html who died also with the diphtheria. Tender, kindly hand-robed the childish form laying him gently down with their own kindred dead, and we saw last night sweet fresh flowers on his grave. Heaven’s blessing will rest on those who care for the poor orphaned waifs of humanity.
 

Subjects: Cemeteries, Charity, Children, Conway (MA), Diseases, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Households, Massachusetts, Mourning Customs, Poor, Religion, Statues, Women, Work, Clothing

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 2, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Conway

Visiting our cemetery the other eve., we were greatly impressed for the new graves within a year. Th past season has been sad, very sad to us. Who has not wept o'er some loved one fallen? Pure white tablets, monumental shafts, marble slabs, how thickly we are marking here and there o'er our made graves. Beautiful flowers, wreaths, yet watered with bitter tears speak to the soul of a grief not simulated but sincere. One of the most tastefully decorated here is the work of Mrs. Chandler Field; her husband and child's grave with other members of the household lying in the neatly laid out, and well cared for elegant home lot.

At one end is the grave of their bound boy taken from the Monson Almshouse, who died also with the diphtheria. Tender, kindly hand-robed the childish form laying him down gently with their own kindred dead, and we saw last night sweet, fresh flowers on his grave. Heaven's blessing will rest on those who care for the poor orphaned waifs of humanity.
 

Subjects: Cemeteries, Charity, Conway (MA), Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Mourning Customs, Orphans and Orphanages

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 29, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

G.S. Eddy has had on exhibition the past week in front of the Band Stand, one of Bruce's Vesper Street lanterns, intended for use in the streets of villages, on public and private grounds, etc. It is a very simple and convenient arrangement for lighting. The lantern is adjustable on the post so that it may be trimmed and lighted without the aid of a ladder, while other advantages are claimed for it over the ordinary method.

[See a description of Bruce's Elevating Street Lamp in Google Books 1874 "Twelfth Exhibition of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Organization"].
 

Subjects: Charity, Clubs, Fires, Greenfield (MA), Inventions, Light, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Roads

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 14, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Turners Falls

The Emmett Band will appear in uniform at the Band picnic at Lake Pleasant on the 30th. A subscription paper was started Sat., and over $100 added to their fund.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Charity, Economics, Food, Lake Pleasant (MA), Montague (MA), Music, Clothing

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 14, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Franklin County tax payers

Greenfield - no. of polls, 927; in 1874, 929; valuation of personal property, 1875, $853,973; in 1874, $828,853; valuation of real estate, 1875, $1,969,665; in 1874, $1,954,790; total valuation, 1875, $2,823,638; in 1874, $2,783,653; rate, 1875, $14.50 per thousand; 1874, $13.50 per thousand.

The following is a list of persons who pay a tax of $25 and upwards, not including fire district tax, which will be about $3 on $1000.

Abell, George A., $41.15
Austin, Thomas N., $33.90
Adams, George C., $87.70
Adams, Peleg, $360.50
Adams, John A., $85.52
Amidon, J.H., $26.65
Avery estate, $30.45
Allen, William H., $89
Allen, F.R., $89
Allen, S’s Sons, $304.50
Allen, George A., $44.05
Allen, Quintas, $83.20
Allen, John S. & Son, $44.82
Arms, George A., $413.80
Arms, Elihu G., $46.95
Aiken, David, $65.80
Ames, James M., $129.75
Ames, James M., trustee, $87
Ames, George, $33.90
Alexander, A.A., $38.83

Bryant, Chauncey, $29.53
Black, Nathaniel, $25.64
Breck, S.P. & son, $71.60
Browning, Anson, $46.95
Briggs, Samuel, $38.98
Breen, John, $36.80
Blake, E.B., $31
Bryant & Miner, $43.50
Brackett, H.W., $31.36
Brown, Harriet, estate, no amount listed
Bouker, Henry, $35.35
Beals, Joseph, $68.70
Bascom, Abner N., $46.59
Bascom, Chester A., $52.67
Billings, Henry F., $60.20
Bullard, A.C., $71
Bullard, Willard, $62.51
Bullard, Silas, $88.28
Barney, Edward, $109
Briggs, Henry D., $33.10
Barton, Lyman G., $183.44
Ballou, Perley & sons, $123.81
Bass, O.H., $39 (I’m rounding off the cents from hereon in)
Burnham, F.L., $28
Bird, Julia, $145
Benton, Edward, $93
Butler, Calvin L., $52
Bangs, J.C., $44

Colle, Mary, $58
Coombs, Mrs. Walter, $114
Carll, J.L., $38
Chapin, Caleb, $45
Chapin, John, $34
Chapin, Julius E., $58
Chapin, David G., $45
Cushman, Mrs. H.W., $50
Chapman, Matthew, $171
Chapman, Frank R., $74
Cohn, Charles, $31
Comstock, W.O., $67
Conant, C.C., $60
Clark, A.S., $40
Childs, M.M., $68
Carpenter, Ira, $61
Coller, D.F., $48
Cook, R.W., $82
Clapp, Mrs. Anna C., $37
Clapp, Frederick, $62
Clapp, H.W. estate, $307
Conn. RR Co., $261
Cong’l. Society, 2nd, $47
Cleveland, Edward, $31

Deane, Alice & sister, $87
Deane, Dr. A.C., $102
Deane, & Wright, $29
Deane, Daniel L., $35
Day, William J., $36
Dodge, Charles F., $45
Davis, W.T., $132
Davis, Henry J., $43
Draper, W.W., $35
Daniels, W.C., $31
Doolittle, George, $729
Dunkley, Edward, $28
DeWolf, Austin, $96
Dwyer, John, $25

Eddy, George S., $80
Embury, H.C., $28
Eagan, Jerry, $33
Elliot, William, $48
Eastman, S.S., $105
Eastman, S.S. & Co., $131
Episcopal Society, $65

Farrell, Lewis, $36
Fisk, Dr. Charles L., $53
Fitzgerald, P.M., $60
Fitzgerald, John, $70
Field, F.E., $31
Farnsworth & Persons, $30
Field, Albert A., $29
Field, Charles R., $183
Field, & Hall, $29
Forbes, William A., $119
Fuller, Mrs. H.M., $36
Frary, George W. $115
Forbes & Foster, $6
Fellows, M.S., $78
Felton, J.P., $99
Field, Mrs. A.R., $75
First National Bank, $174 (had Nirst)
Franklin County National Bank, $362

Grennell, George, $212 (also seen as Grinnell)
Graves, John J., $45
Graves, Luther L., $35
Graves, Mrs. J.M., $31
Graves, Alonzo, $89
Gascouigne, J.F., $49
Griswold, W., estate, $40
Griswold, Duloie, g’d’n, $108
Griswold J.F., $83
Gunn, Levi J., $66
Greenfield Tool Co., $420

Henry, Benjamin, $45
Henry, Nathan F., $130
Henry, Charles, $35
Henry, & Smead, $38
Hagar, F.S., $67
Haskell, C.C., $28
Hunter, David, $45
Harris, H.C., $31
Haywood, L.M., $31
Hosmer, F.J., guardian, $62
Haywood, Mrs. G.P., $78
Horr, John, $42
Holcomb, Alfred, $29
Hall, E.A., $32
Hall, S.W., $75
Howland, Rufus, $183
Hall, T.V., $30
Hollister, J.H., $375
Hovey, Dr. Daniel, estate, $224
Hovey, George H., $425
HItchcock, A.C., $31
Hawks, Frederick, $57
Handforth, Henry, $50
Hull, A.N., $41

Jackson, Andrew, $31
Jackson, Mrs. O.M., $56
Joslyn & Kimball, $101
Jones, O.M., $30
Jones, Ed J., $144
Jones, Dennis W., $64

Kennedy, John, $33
Kelliher, Dennis, $36
Kellogg, Bela, $56
Kellogg, Bela & Co., $48
Keith, Charles, $88
Keuran, H.E., $73
Keith, William, $141
Kelley, F.B. & F.S., $85

Lamb, J.H., $48
Lamb, Samuel O., $93
Lamb, Samuel O., agent, $29
Lamb, Samuel O., Ex’r., J. Miles estate, $92
Lamb, Samuel O., Ex’r., F.B. Russell, $203
Lamb, Samuel O., Treasurer, Greenfield Gas Co., $174
Lawrence, Royal, $31
Loomis, Rev. A.G., $64
Leonard, Mrs. Theo, $91
Lyons, J.L., $210
Lyons, David, $26
Lyons, Samuel J., $33
Lyons, Charles D., $26
Long, Lemuel H., $60
Leavitt, Miss Mary, $65
Lowell, Charles R., $60
Leighton, C.W., $54
Leonard, Horatio, $29
Lander, Ben D., $29
Lyman, E.E., $44
Larrabee, Eber X., $91

Moody, Mrs. Fannie, $36
Miller, J.W., $60
Miller, H.L., $64
McClure, Manly, $68
Murdock, Charles A., $26
Merriam, E.D., $74
McFarland, John, $67
Miner, A.G., $48
Moore, Mrs. Oramel, estate, $43
Moore & Withey, $73
Moore, J.W. & Son, $101
McClellan, C.H., $118
Maxwell, S.S., $76
Methodist Society, $58
Maynard, Gilbert, $35
Moors, John F., $73
Munn, Charles H., $52
Martin, Frank E., $53
Munson, J.M., $252
Martindale, P.D., $122
Megrath, A.W., $52

Nash, Lyman & Son, $114
Noyes, B.B., $29
Noyes, B.B. & Co., $100
Nichols, John, $32
Newhall, Albert, $29
Newhall, Mrs. Mary, $58
Newton, James, $285
Newton, Joseph D., $133
Newton, John S., $113
Newton, H.C. & son, $97
Newton, Seth, $64
Nims, Lucius & Son, $224
Nims, Charles T., $95
Nims, William M., $82
Nash, E.Q., $142

Owen, Euclid, $129
Osgood, J.W.D., $163
Osbon, E.H., $29
Osterhout, John, $55
Osgood, E. and son, $53

Parker, Alonzo, $118
Parker, B.S., $54
Phillips, Simeon, $33
Phelps, John C., $31
Phillips, Rufus, $64
Phillips, N.P. & Son, $52
Potter & Stearns, $27
Potter, George W., $130
Potter & Nash, $161
Potter, William, $133
Potter, Warren J., $100
Pierce, George, $32
Pierce, George Jr., $38
Pierce & Austin, $68
Pierce & Co., $54
Pierce, J.J. & Sons, $233
Pierce, J.J. & Others, $87
Pratt, F.J., $93
Pratt, Stephen L., $41
Payne, H.B. & S.W., $95
Prichard, R.S., $28
Porter, James, $57
Porter, Pliny, $27
Parmenter, E.A., $116
Prentiss, H.H., $29
Phelps, Ansel estate, $389
Packard, R.A., $89
Pine, William, $42
Pond, Mary, $410
Pond, Frank A., $63
Pierce, M.R. & N.G., $44
Pierce, M.R., $33
Pierce, N.G., $29
Pickett, Job G., $48
Potter, E. Turner, $77

Richardson, J.J., $129
Richardson, J.B., $45
Richmond, Charles, $39
Reed, Charles N., $39
Root, Spencer B., $229
Root, W.F., $91
Root, T.D. estate, $63
Russell, J., estate, $488
Russell, Nathaniel E., $413
Rice, Mrs. L.W., $29
Robinson, James, $31
Reed, Kate & H., $36
Rowley, Joseph Jr., $28
Ripley, Thomas H., $31
Riley, Samuel, $36
Riddell, J.W., $218
Root, Cephas estate, $34
Russell, John, $57

Simons, D.S., $438
Sheldon, Henry, $28
Sheldon, John, $38
Spear, Daniel W., $112
Sauter, Gotleib, $70
Sprague, Peter T., $31
Smead, William M., $74
Smead, William, $50
Smead, Charles L., $94
Smead, S.A., estate, $105
Sawtell, Lyman, $25
Shaw, D.G., $42
Spring, J.C., $45
Stratton, E.A., $35
Stratton, C.M., $60
Strecker, Edward, $168
Sparhawk, Mrs. L.B., $36
Stone, L.H., $45
Stearns, John H., $33
Stones, Mrs. H. & A., $37
Stevens, Mrs. H., $65
Stimpson, W.A., $28
Seward & Willard, $116
Sammis, D.L., $120
Severance, Dr. W.S., $69
Severance, P.P., $144
Sessler, Jacob, $34
Stickney, William, $78
Sanderson, J.S., $123
Snow, Barnabas, $54
Snow, Newell, $67
Snow & Felton, $58
Slate, S.B., $69
Sawyer, Benjamin, $28
Smith, L.T., $44
Smith, Elijah W., $69
Smith, F.G., $72
Smith, Preserved, $52
Shattuck, S.L., $121
Shattuck & Co., $108
Smead, C.W., $72
Salisbury, George E., $54

Thompson, J.W., $26
Thompson, F.M., $41
Tyler, C.H., $28
Tyler, Major H., $46
Tyler, H.H., $52
Traver, Phillip, $60
Thayer, A.T. estate, $34

Washburn, W.B., $509
Woods, Hopkins, $53
Wells, Frank, $35
Wells, Edward, $25
Woodard, Mrs. E.G., $47
Woodard, H.G., $133
Wilson, Joel, $212
Wilby, George, $26
Williams, G.D., $41
Williams, G.D., trustee, $104
Wade, T.S., $74
Wade & Corbett, $36
Wiley, Robert, $103
Wiley, Solon L., $103
Wiley, Oren, $95
Womersley, Dr. T., $41
Wait, Thomas, $104
Wait, Lyman J., $31
Wise, Willard A., $27
Walker, Dr. A.C., $78
Wells, N.S., $52
Wells, C.B., $42
Wise, William M., $102
Wright, A.H., $125
Wiliams, Misses, $36
Ward, Mrs. E.V., $87
Ward, Mrs. E.V., guardian, $58
Wheeler, S.S., $54
Wunsch, William, $96
Wood, Seth, $39
Warner, A.K., $52
Warner Mfg. Co., $73
Zeiner, John L., $28

Non-residents

Adams, Amos, Montague, $116
Botsford, Mrs. Lizzie A., Boston, $145
Bardwell, O.O., Shelburne, $26
Conant, Mrs. S.T., Newark, N.J., $40
Couillard, Henry, Shelburne, $43
Coleman, Matthew, Springfield, $40
Dickinson, Caleb, estate, Hatfield, $33
Fisk, D.O., Shelburne, $60
Goss, R.L., Montague, $79
Hopkins, W.S.B., Worcester, $58
Hale, Israel P., Bernardston, $31
Long, Alanson, Boston, $51
Merriam, Charles, Springfield, $72
Pierce, Samuel R., Turners Falls, $53
Schwartz, Louis B., Boston, $166
Sage, O.W., Cazenovia, N.Y., $28
Sanborn, W.H., New Haven, $268
Smith Charities, Northampton, $1700
Slate, Charles, Shelburne, $34
Sanderson, John, Bernardston, $72
Thompson, Charles, Conn., $31
Temple, Philo, Deerfield, $27
Todd, Cynthia, Leyden, $27
Turners Falls Company, $290
Wells, D. & H., Shelburne, $53
Williams, Bishop, Boston, $29.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Charity, Connecticut, Connecticut River, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Family, Fires, Government, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Montague (MA), Names, Natural Resources, Orphans and Orphanages, Religion, Rich People, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Stores, Retail, Sunderland (MA)

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 11, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Turners Falls

The Second Congregational Church of Holyoke, Rev. J.L.R. Trask, pastor, unsolicited, sends the church at Turners Falls $28, accompanied with the following letter: "The Second Congregational Church of this city [Holyoke], realizing from its own history, the needs which a young church in a manufacturing village sometimes needs, voted to ask your church to accept the within amount to be appropriated as you may deem most expedient". The Turners Falls Society, though small and made by the removal of several members from town [Greenfield], weak and somewhat dependent, is still making good progress and doing good work. The need is a church building of its own, where its people would feel more at home and would be encouraged to new zeal and effort.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Charity, Economics, Elections, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, History, Mail, Montague (MA), Religion, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 11, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
The Odd Fellows [or Oddfellows] at Lake Pleasant

Seldom have fairer skies lured the picnicker to the Lake than shone last Thurs., upon the occasion of the fourth annual picnic of the Connecticut River Valley Association of Odd Fellows. http://www.ioof.org/ The river towns were well represented, many coming from Northampton, Holyoke and Springfield to the south; From Shelburne Falls and North Adams via the Tunnel, to the West; from Fitchburg and Leominster, with intermediate towns to the east, while from Keene, N.H. and Brattleboro, Ct., good delegations were sent. The no. of lodges present was 19, and encampments, 3; estimated to have been 1200 members of the Order, and with their ladies and friends, from 3000 to 4000 persons at the Lake during the day.

The general exercises were begun with the band concert in the Grove, the Hartford City Band leading, following which, the Brattleboro and Keene Brass bands kept the air resounding with melody. The first named band seemed to be the favorite, and executed some very fine pieces, among which an overture, "The Golden Crown" and "Potpourri" from Bellisario were the best, while "Concert Polka" by the Keene Band, with a solo by Will Allen, was decidedly applauded.

The exercises at the speaker’s stand were of the first order; the principal thing being the address by the orator of the day, Rev. A.H. Sweetser of Springfield, who was introduced to the audience by H.A. Bowen of Shelburne Falls, President of the Association. The speaker in opening, referred to the symbolism of Odd Fellowship as being in consonance with everything around us; as light symbolizes heaven, darkness hell; flowers of fragrance, and all nature as of God; so the "clasped hands", the "three links", etc. of the Order, spoke of great truths, and symbols were right if they had truth behind them.

The system of Odd Fellowship came, not as an interloper upon earth, but it was formed to fill a need, and it came to stay, as long as irreligion and want were abroad among men. by association, which as the name implied meant strength - they would apply their principles to the wants and needs of life. Friendship, love and truth were the threefold cords which they were to use, and for which they should labor with their united strength. If you obey the principles of our order, said the speaker, you have no need of liturgies or dogmas, but you have enough to carry you through life and into the gates of the Celestial City.

He next referred to the need of sympathy; on the need of extending it to every man; for no man lived but what had a heart and a spark of God within him. Our present social and educational fabric was characterized as wholly wrong. Social life was shoddy; the ill educated were put forward, and to "shine well" without "being well", was the curse of the world. Odd Fellowship was to correct this; it found alone the man, and whatever his cost; it discerned true worth and gave to it its true respect.

The speaker next passed to the feminine branch of the Order, if it may be thus called, and dwelt with words of praise on the "Sisterhood of Rebecca". He said they found no time to mount the rostrum and to proclaim their duties and rights by noisy words, but in the quiet paths of home and the sphere in which their branch of the order furnished them, they performed the noblest duties of life. In closing, he said that the great duty of the fraternity was to bring people together, to root out sectarian feeling in the churches, and to teach all the true spirit of humanity and brotherhood.

The address was well written and delivered in an excellent manner, occupying about 40 minutes, during which time the vast crowd remained quiet, listening with evident satisfaction. The various exercises at the stand were interspersed by several good songs by J.A. Maxam of Keene, and glees by a male quartette from the same place. Billy Fisher of Springfield amused the people considerably by rendering one or two comic pieces and the delivery of a stump speech.

During the afternoon, the lovers of the "light fantastic" crowded the Pavilion, tripping to the notes of Southland’s Orchestra of Springfield, while a majority of the balance pressed the borders sof the Lake to catch a glimpse of the boat and tub races. For some reason, the contestants for the prizes of the athletic sports rather held back, and for a time it seemed as this part of the programme would have to be omitted; but champions at last were found, and the races had, with the following results:

Boat race for men, 3/4 of a mile with turn, 3 entries, prize, a gold-lined silver goblet, won by Henry Howell of Springfield; boat race for ladies, half mile and turn, 2 entries, first prize a silver butter dish, won by Miss Mary Mehony; second prize, a gold lined silver cup, won by Miss Nellie Malone, both of Springfield. the tub race, 100 yards with turn, 3 entries, prize a gold lined silver spoon holder, won by John McHanna of Springfield. The sack race, 200 yards with turn, two entries, prize a silver napkin ring with stand, was also won by John McHanna.

The general exercises, except the dancing, closed with a dress parade in regalia, by the Agawam Oasis and Monadnock encampments. While the crowd were enjoying the public programme, the knots of hundreds were equally interested by the semi-public amusements of boating on the lake, swinging in the grove, eating and drinking and marveling at the talking wonders of Punch and Judy. quiet and good order reigned, and all interested voted it the most successful picnic of the Association.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Beverages, Charity, Clubs, Connecticut, Connecticut River, Contests, Dance, Education, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Jokes, Lake Pleasant (MA), Light, Massachusetts, Montague (MA), Music, Names, New Hampshire, Noise, Poor, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 11, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Dedication of the Smith college for women

Long article. See http://clio.fivecolleges.edu/smith/newspapers/ for many other pertinent articles.
 

Subjects: Charity, Education, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Literature / Web Pages, Women

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
Foreign

At a recent bullfight in Madrid 8 bulls, 12 horses and 2 men were killed. A singular circumstance connected with this affair is that it was organized for the benefit of a society for assisting widows and orphans.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Animals / Reptiles, Charity, Contests, Orphans and Orphanages, Sports, Widows and Widowers, Europe

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 7, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

We referred last week to the fact that Republican Lodge was organized under a charter granted by Paul Revere in 1795. The first record book of the lodge is still preserved, and is quite an interesting relic of antiquity. We find that in the original bylaws the fraternity were subjected to very strict rules, as will be seen by the following extract: "Should any Brother be so impudent as to make use of any profane language or indecent behavior during Lodge hours, he or they so offending shall pay a fine of one shilling, lawful money, for every such offense, to be put into the fund for the relief of the poor brethren.

/ And the fraternity were instructed to be cautious, both within and without the lodge, that no reflection be cast against the order. They had a temperance clause in their bylaws, too: "If any Brother should be so void of shame as to disguise himself with liquor, or come to the lodge disguised in liquor, he shall be fined 25 cents and be dismissed for the night, and at the next meeting be reprimanded", and no brother was allowed to play cards or gamble. In 1820, however, we find that at a meeting where only 3 were present, it was voted to pass a bill of 18 cents for refreshments, which would cover the price for 3 glasses of rum; but that was a miserable allowance for those days. We find that as early as 1814, Hon. George Grennell, who is yet with us, held an office in the lodge, and a few years afterward was made Worshipful Master.
 

Subjects: Charity, Clubs, Drunkenness, Economics, Freemasonry, Gambling, Glass / Windows, Greenfield (MA), History, Law and Lawyers, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Poor, Temperance, Words

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 24, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

As the nights become warmer, the tramps prefer to take their lodgings in hay mows and convenient sheds rather than in the luxurious quarters provided by our town authorities. Mr. Jones, the landlord of the Retreat, thought Thurs. night that he wasn't to have a solitary patron, but at a late hour, two stragglers put in an appearance. If operations are commenced on this section of the Troy & Greenfield Railroad, however, we shall find that the army of tramps will flock this way as they never have yet.
 

Subjects: Charity, Dreams / Sleep, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Greenfield (MA), Prisons, Trains, Tramps, War / Weaponry, Weather, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 24, 1875
Shelburne Falls

We hope our friends will patronize the lame man, Josiah King, who has been unable to do his usual work in selling pictures of various kinds.
 

Subjects: Charity, Handicapped, Sales, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Greenfield's proportion of the Smith charities fund tax is $117,244.
 

Subjects: Charity, Economics, Greenfield (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 10, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The number of tramps who patronized the retreat during the month of April was 130.
 

Subjects: Charity, Greenfield (MA), Prisons, Tramps

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 10, 1875
A touching incident

[Tells the tale of a recently widowed man, with babe in arms, on an East bound train. He is awkward with the baby's bottle, so a woman passenger feeds and holds the baby for the entire trip].
 

Subjects: Beverages, Charity, Children, Glass / Windows, Trains, Widows and Widowers, Women


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