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Feb 27, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Grange, National

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Bloody Brook celebration

The Bloody Brook celebration - Though crippled and discouraged by the disastrous fire, the people of South Deerfield do not propose to "back out" of the Bicentennial Celebration of the Massacre of Bloody Brook which had been arranged for next Fri. With the aid and the cooperation of the residents of Old Deerfield and neighboring towns, they propose to carry out the programme, giving the thousands who may come to participate in the honors and pleasures of the day a cordial and generous welcome.

The services of commemoration are held in connection with the sixth annual field meeting of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association. The President of the day is Hon. George T. Davis of Portland, Me., with Hon. George Grennell, Hon. James S. Whitney, Col. David Wells, Rev. C.S. Brooks, James C. Arms, Henry Childs, George W. Jones, Hon. W.B. Washburn, Rev. F.A. Warfield, Rev. J.F. Moors, Col. Austin Rice for Vice Presidents.

A grand procession will be formed at the depot on the arrival of the train from the north at 10 1/2 a.m., Col. J.B. Parsons of Northampton acting as Chief Marshal. Participating in the parade will be 7 companies of Col. Parson's command, the 2nd Regiment, the South Deerfield Band, members of the Grand Army and Veterans of the late war, the officers, speakers and poets of the day, Patrons of Husbandry, aged citizens, invited guests and other civic bodies and citizens generally.

The order of exercises will be as follows: Dirge by the South Deerfield Band; opening address by George Sheldon, Chairman of the Committee; an original ode by E.W.B. Canning, sung by the Quartette Club; prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. C.S. Brooks; music by the Band; oration by Hon. George B. Loring of Salem; collation; music; poem by William Everett of Cambridge; ode by Miss Eliza A. Starr, sung by the Quartette Club; and then will follow short addresses, music, etc.

The collation will be served in the same way as at the Whatelly Centennial - paper napkins being distributed and the provisions then passed around. The Deerfield Guards had invited several companies of their regiment, intending to provide for their entertainment, but as the fire destroyed some $500 or $600 worth of property belonging to the Guards, they are almost in a bankrupt condition, and the citizens of the town have now come forward and guarantee to furnish the military with a collation.

The people who attend are supposed to carry their lunch baskets and are requested to furnish what they can for our guests of the town who come unprovided. As the hotels of the place have been destroyed, all strangers will be dependent upon the citizens for entertainment. Passengers over the Connecticut River Railroad will be transported for half fare. and the same courtesy will be extended from North Adams and stations west of Greenfield on the Vt. & Mass. road.

All Grangers who attend the Bi-centennial are requested to report at the house of Norman B. Clark, a little south of the monument near the grave of Lathrop, where a committee of the order will be in readiness to receive and wait upon them. The people of Deerfield will be called upon to contribute provisions for the occasion by solicitors in each neighborhood, and they should be prepared to contribute biscuit, cold meats and plain cake.

The Pocumtuck Lodge of Odd Fellows of Greenfield have voted to attend the gathering and parcipate in the parade. The committee of arrangements though not issuing special invitations, desire the attendance of all organizations, including the Grand Army and other secret societies.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Cemeteries, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Fires, Food, Greenfield (MA), Heritage Activities, Holidays, Hotels, Massachusetts, Meat, Mourning Customs, Music, Native Americans, Old Age, Poetry, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Statues, Trains, Transportation, War / Weaponry, Whately (MA)

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Coleraine

Situated up among the hills, yet we have some beautiful valleys as well as the lovely mountain scenery - we are a busy people - few if any loungers or unemployed, all have something to do, notwithstanding the cry of hard times so often heard. There are 3 cotton mills, many more lumber mills, 2 butter box manufactories, most kinds of mechanic shops, all of which are doing a good business.

Some very fine carriages are made here; there are several stores, 5 churches, two Methodist Episcopal, one Congregational, 2 Baptist. Five secret societies, viz. Grand Army Post, Sons of Temperance, two Sovereigns of Industry and a Grange; that we have a good hotel we hardly need assert as those who pass this way know, as well as others who read the papers.

We have many good farms well cultivated and from appearances are about to yield satisfactory harvests; the late rains have done much to improve crops. The farmers are getting wiser and are raising less tobacco than in former years, other crops receiving more attention such as grass, corn, oats, etc. and are looking well.

We know of no place in town where intoxicating liquors are sold, and one drunk is rarely seen. We have no railroad but there is considerable talk of one. Our schools, some 15 in number, are good, comparing favorably with those around us, and our mail facilities and modes of conveyance to and from are equal to larger towns, and places on railroads with the exception of the iron horse.

A good number from more crowded towns stopping here during the warm weather, yet there is room for others.
 

Subjects: Bars (Drinking establishments), Business Enterprises, Clubs, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Horses, Hotels, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Religion, Smoking and Tobacco, Stores, Retail, Temperance, Trains, Transportation, Vacations, War / Weaponry, Weather, Work, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 7, 1875
Deerfield

It was Edgar Allen Poe who said if a woman had a true perception of the beautiful, she would give evidence of the fact in every movement, in her every piece of handiwork, and that even the rustling of her robes would sound like a divine harmony. The Deerfield ladies who ornamented the Unitarian church for Decoration Day certainly displayed superior taste, and we know all interested in the occasion feel grateful to them for their decorative skill, as well as for the bountiful collation they so gracefully served in the Grange Hall.

/ "I slept and dreamed that life was beauty / I woke, and found that life was duty"...If universal testimony is to be regarded, the most beautiful and tasteful memento furnished for the occasion mentioned, was the floral monument, worked by the artistic hands of Mrs. Edward C. Cowles. Violets, both blue and white, were the only material...We are a poor hand at description; the violets have withered, and soon the masterpiece will be forgotten. In this coarse material "tobacco era", the truly beautiful is the quickest lost. But whether in the future tobacco sells high or low, there are a few who will still remember the two foot violet monument with its graceful proportions, its duplicate base, the words "REST" (worked with violets) near the top; and rising above the cap-stone, that seemingly angelic hand, pointing to a higher life, a glorious transition - a heavenly appointed translation from Deerfield tobacco materialism to eternal progression. Pocumtuck.
 

Subjects: Art, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Dreams / Sleep, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Literature / Web Pages, Mourning Customs, Native Americans, Noise, Poetry, Religion, Sales, Smoking and Tobacco, War / Weaponry, Women, Work, Grange, National, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 10, 1875
Grangers

Grangers, sovereigns, middle men or any other man can save 20% by buying the William Anson Woods "Eagle" Mowing Machine...H.C. Haskell, Great River, Deerfield.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Business Enterprises, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Sales, Vendors and Purchasers, Work, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 19, 1875
Charlemont

We understand the I.O. of G.T. are perusing Webster's spelling book preparatory to challenging the Grangers to match them in a trial for the championship.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Clubs, Contests, Literature / Web Pages, Spelling, Words, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 19, 1875
Northfield

The Grange Sociable was a success. The Worthy Master opened his doors and gave his numerous guests a hearty welcome. The spread, to which complete justice was done, was furnished by the ladies. The Northfield Band provided music for the occasion, and show signs of much promise for the future. There will be another Grange meeting on Tues. eve.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Food, Music, Northfield (MA), Parties, Women, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
Sunderland

Whereas Death has removed from our Society and our Community, and our Grange, our much esteemed citizen, friend and brother, Ephraim E. Robinson, to whom as much as anyone belongs the credit of establishing this Grange, and who held the office of Overseer in it: Resolved...etc. The Grange is fast becoming a fixed fact. Meetings are held weekly and appearances are that it will be profitable to the members, both intellectually and pecuniarily. The soap question has been met and satisfactorily settled. A committee for the introduction of new members has been chosen, of whom Samuel Smith is Chairman, to whom all who wish to join him should apply.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Cosmetics, Economics, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Sunderland (MA), Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 5, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Everybody, accompanied by his wife and children, attended the reception of Mother Goose and her friends at Washington Hall last Tues. eve. It was the first public masquerade party ever given in Greenfield, and a triumphant success in every particular. At an early hour the stage, the gallery and seats on the sides of the hall were packed by the spectators.

/ Soon after 8 the doors were thrown open and in marched Mother Goose with a long column of the most ridiculous looking creatures it is possible to imagine. In they poured and so numerous that the floor of the hall was completely taken up by the grotesque masquerade. A greater variety of costumes it would be difficult to collect together, or a more complete mingling of the grave and the gay, the sublime and the ridiculous.

/ Over 200 characters were represented, so we can not attempt to review them all in detail. A dark-robed courtier mounted the stage and introduced Mother Goose and her associates as they passed before him. Among them was the man who went to London to buy him a wife and who was returning with his precious load in a wheelbarrow. Jack and Mrs. Sprat put in an appearance. Robinson Crusoe, with his coat from the old nanny goat, accompanied by his man Friday; Beauty and the Beast, King Cole and the Three Fiddlers, the Babes in the Woods who were, by the way, as fine specimens of 'diminutive' babyhood as one would care to see. Then "Rub a dub dub / Three men in a tub" came the Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker, with the implements of their calling, and the Four and Twenty Tailors that went to kill a snail / When the best man among them durst not touch his tail",

/ The Old Woman who lived in a Shoe was wheeled along in the procession, while her many children poked their heads out of the shoe at every available crack and crevice. Old Mother Hubbard with her dog, the Four Kings and their Queens, with the Knave of Hearts were there, and Cross Patch, Little Boy Blue, Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater, Jack Horner, Tommy Tucker, Bo-Peep, Wee Willie Winkle, Red Riding Hood and Grandmother, the Three Black Crows, and a host of other characters from the famous nursery rhymes, while a Flower Girl, Sinbad the Sailor, St. Nicholas, Rip Van Winkle, Modock Jack, Maud Muller http://www.geocities.com/Athens/2464/maud.html , the Heathen Chinee, an Italian Organ Grinder and Tambourine Girl, a Phantom Band, Monks and Nuns, Lords and Ladies of low and high degree were scattered among the motley throng, and an orang-outang in native garb roamed at will through the crowd.

/ Noticeable among the costumes was that of a Chinese lady of rank, not a cheaply improvised affair, but one direct from the Celestial country, now in the possession of a lady of this town. Another dress that attracted especial attention was made of copies of the Springfield Republican, a real natty dress affair, with elaborate trimmings and furbelows. The Pet of the Grangers, whose presence was anticipated as one of the sensations of the evening, was unavoidably absent, but King Kalakua came back to the United States that he might grace the occasion by his royal presence.

/ A few figures were danced by the masqueraders and the floor was then open to all. When masks were removed, there was a season of mutual recognition. Some of the disguises were complete, many not being able to make out their best friends. The music was furnished by Osbon's Orchestra. Cream and cake were served by the ladies, and the evening was made as pleasant as possible. As a financial success the party is almost without precedent. Between 800 and 900 admission tickets were sold and the net receipts $275.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Birds, Caricatures and Cartoons, Children, Chinese, Dance, Economics, English (and England), Family, Fashion, Food, Furniture, Greenfield (MA), Italians, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Music, Names, Native Americans, Old Age, Parties, Poetry, Religion, Royalty

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 5, 1875
Charlemont

The Grange has now reached its first quarter since its organization and is in a flourishing condition and has a membership of nearly 50. C.E. Cooley is the authorized trading agent of the Grange.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Clubs, Economics, Sales, Vendors and Purchasers, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 29, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The success of the Mother Goose Party at Washington Hall tomorrow evening, under the direction of the ladies of the St. James Aid Society, is already assured. The committee have a list of from 150 to 200 characters that have already been taken. The hall will be opened at 7 1/2 o'clock and the grand entrance of the masqueraders in procession will take place at 8 o'clock. The dancing will be exclusively for those in character until 9 o'clock, and then others present will have an opportunity to trip the light fantastic.

/ Osbon's Orchestra will furnish the music, and H.O. Rockwood will act as Prompter. Refreshments will be served during the evening and everything done to make the affair as pleasant as possible. Among the characters to be present, we are requested to announce the first appearance of the "Pet of the Grangers". A costumer from Springfield will be at Mr. Hollister's today to furnish costumes to those who desire them.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Birds, Businesspeople, Charity, Clubs, Dance, Food, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Light, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Parties, Stores, Retail, Women, Work, Grange, National, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 29, 1875
Northfield

(Grange resolution of sympathy on the death of Miss Anna P, Alexander, sister of the Grange).
 

Subjects: Clubs, Mourning Customs, Northfield (MA), Women, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 22, 1875
Deerfield

By way of reaction from the prolonged strain of the most severe winter many of us have ever known, our whole neighborhood has lately taken itself to masquerading or costuming in every possible form, until this dreaded month of March fairly ’blossoms like the rose’ with innocent merry making. One of the most successful and brilliant of these various festivities was a masquerade party at the Grange Hall, Deerfield, on Wed. eve. last., under the auspices of the "Ladies’ Social Circle" of the Unitarian Society; the object being to raise money in behalf of certain needs of the society.

About 60 people assembled in costume, closely masked during the first part of the evening; the disguises, in most instances, being quite impenetrable, even to familiar friends of the wearers...Several of the most charming costumes were worn by little children. The hall was uncomfortably crowded with delighted spectators, who vainly tried to solve the puzzling mysteries of mask and dress while watching the cotillions and contra dances of the masqueraders. Here was to be seen a Towering Turk arm in arm with a Highland Lassie, while opposite to them, the "Woman in White" bobbed frantically about before the "King of Trumps". A coquettish "Fille de Regiment" with jaunty steps and canteen slung over her shoulder, went down the middle with a gigantic and warlike "Indian Chief".

"America" had for partner a festive young "Darkey" [or Darky], emblematic of the recent passage of the Civil Rights bill, while the grotesque figure of "The Old Woman with Rings on her Fingers and Bells on her toes" promenaded on the arm of a bold "Sailor Boy". A saucy "Negro Bootblack" with apparatus complete, offered to shine the shoes of a "Water Nymph" bedecked with shells and seaweed. A stately "Spanish Donna" [i.e. Do~na] in lace mantilla, devoted herself for the space of one cotillion to the "Master of Mirth", who needed no disguise.

Young gentlemen in the ruffles and knee buckles of the last century amused themselves with the prettiest impersonations of the "Four Seasons" or "Peasant Girls" or "Fairies" as the case might be. A gay "Roman Peasant Girl" in national costume, chatted with stalwart "Highlanders" or glittering "Night", while "Morning" with her starry raiment made friends with all nationalities alike. Throughout the evening, at one end of the hall, the twin "Aunt Betseys" held their admiring court behind a table covered with dainties dear to the heart and palate of childhood.

The star performance of the evening was that of the "Hand Organ Woman" who created much amusement with her comic songs, and who fairly earned the heavy hat full of pennies which she received from the appreciative crowd of listeners. A bountiful supper was served in the cosey [i.e. cozy] refreshment room adjoining the hall; the dancers having previously unmasked, in the midst of much laughter and astonishment on behalf of the bystanders, whose shrewdest guesses were often proved to have been wide of the mark. Dancing was kept up until 12 o’clock, all entering into the spirit of the occasion with evident enthusiasm...And considering only 5 days’ notice was given of the party, the masqueraders themselves deserve many compliments for the beauty and picturesqueness of their costumes; showing both fertile brains and skilful fingers, while even in those most grotesque and fanciful, there was nothing to offend good taste.

We all know that "A little nonsense now and then / Is relished by the best of men". And this "Masquerade Party" clearly proved the benefit of hearty laughter to human nature in general, and to Deerfield human nature in particular.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Amusements, Astronomy, Children, Clubs, Contests, Dance, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Family, Fashion, Food, French, Furniture, Italians, Jokes, Latin America, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Native Americans, Old Age, Parties, Poetry, Poor

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 15, 1875
Deerfield

There is to be a masquerade party at Grange Hall on Wed. eve., under the auspices of the Ladies' Social Circle. In addition to the attraction of the masquerading, coffee and cakes will be furnished, and a dance will close the affair. Admission fee 10 cents, refreshments 15 cents, dancing 50 cents. No doubt the entertainment will be well worth attending.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Beverages, Clubs, Dance, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Food, Parties, Women, Grange, National, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 8, 1875
South Deerfield

Prof. Stockbridge of Amherst will give a public lecture before the Sugarloaf Grange [also seen as Sugar Loaf Grange] at Armory Hall on Tues. eve. The public generally are invited.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Education, Food, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 8, 1875
South Deerfield

The South Deerfield Cornet Band made all the arrangements with the citizens of this place, as well as with many in some of the neighboring towns, for the celebration of the 20th anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. C.P. Aldrich's wedding on Mon. eve., but owing probably to some misunderstanding with the clerk of the weather, or to disinterestedness in such matters, the evening proved to be one of the most stormy of the season, so but few ventured out; enough, however, to have a very pleasant time, and make arrangements for another gathering on Thurs. eve. Notwithstanding the severe storm of Wed. night and Thurs. morning and the exceedingly bad going, some 150, among whom were friends from Greenfield, Northfield, Amherst and Conway, gathered to greet and congratulate our worthy friends.

/ At about 10 o'clock the dining room was thrown open and the company invited to a bountiful supply of refreshments, served under the direction of Messrs. Jewetts, Reib, and Cooley, in behalf of the Band, assisted by several ladies of the village. The inner man being satisfied, Rev. Mr. Brooks was invited to present to the host and hostess a beautiful ice pitcher with salver from the band, two easy chairs from the friends in Greenfield, two elegant vases from the friends in Northampton, and also two from friends in South Deerfield.

/ Mr. B. made the presentation in his usual easy, but very interesting and appropriate manner, to which Mr. Aldrich responded in a very happy strain; remarks were made by Rev. Mr. Granger, and letters of congratulation were read from the following who were unable to be present: Mr. John M. Smith, Sunderland; Mrs. E.J. Everett in behalf of her husband, who is sick, Deerfield, and H. Townsend; W.M. of Morning Sun Lodge; E.V.M., Conway. There were quite large delegations intending to be present from Greenfield, Ashfield, Northampton, Amherst and Leverett, but owing to the severe storm they were counseled to stay at home.

/ Many of the older people retired about midnight, leaving a large company of young folks to enjoy the merry dance. The Band, led by our worthy townsman, Mr. Day, were in the best trim and discharged excellent music during the evening. Mr. Aldrich has been with us 4 years, and the late gatherings with him speak more than words in his favor. Viola, Charlie, and the S.D.C. Band.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Ashfield (MA), Beverages, Clubs, Conway (MA), Dance, Deerfield (MA), Diseases, Food, Furniture, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Leverett (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Music, Northfield (MA), Old Age, Parties, Religion, Sunderland (MA), Transportation, Weather, Women, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 8, 1875
And now comes the charges of a 'ring' in the National Grange of Patrons of Husbandry by which a few leading officers in headquarters are gobbling enormous salaries

And now comes the charges of a 'ring' in the National Grange of Patrons of Husbandry by which a few leading officers in headquarters are gobbling enormous salaries, and cannot show a satisfactory percent of receipts and expenditures...
 

Subjects: Clubs, Crime, Economics, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Thu, Sep 7, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 22, 1875
(Charlemont) The Deerfield Valley Farmers Institute met at East Charlemont Feb. 13, and discussed the following question: Ought we to encourage the formation of a Grange in every town, and how can we

(Charlemont) The Deerfield Valley Farmers Institute met at East Charlemont Feb. 13, and discussed the following question: Ought we to encourage the formation of a Grange in every town, and how can we best market our produce? L. Richmond opened the debate, and said he knew very little of the practical workings of the Grange system, and would like to hear the subject candidly and fairly discussed; S.B. Smith said the object of the Grange is to bring the producer and consumer together; that it is not only the policy but the duty of Grangers to deal directly and on a cash basis. That it is simply a combination of men to get the benefit of wholesale trade. It is also intended for the good of the farmer socially and intellectually. J.H. Abbott wished to know what it cost to run a Grange, and if any but charter members are eligible to office, and what was its social advantages. Mr. Smith repled that there was no salaried officer in the Grange but the Secretary of the State Grange, and that of necessity the officers are chosen from the charter members to hold office one year; then all had an equal chance as to its social advantages; any institution of this kind is what the members make it. We recognize the equality of the sexes and welcome the farmer’s wife and daughters to a membership in our order. Said farmers need culture to give them a place in good society; did not wish to speak disrespectful of farmers. "The fault is not in our steers but in ourselves". At this juncture the society was called upon to read the Declaration of Purposes of the National Grange. J. Johnson calls them glittering generalities, and admits that the laboring classes are overburdened by taxation. Says the Grange is a step toward the work of reform. Mr. Canady said he had been informed that the Grange was not allowed to discuss political questions. Mr. Smith replied that the word political in the constitution refers to partisan politics, and refers in no way to matters of political economy. Col. R.H. Leavitt thinks favorably of the Grange: thinks it destined to become a power for good in this country. Said the transportation question is the great question of the day: thinks at no distant day the Grange will ship largely from the West, and therefore be able to obtain special rates. J.M. Legate said he was not a Granger but was in full sympathy with them, and wants to see more power in the hands of the laboring classes, and our offices filled with men of judgment, honor and honesty. S. Ward liked the sound of the Declaration of Purposes, and said if the sentiments could be carried out it would result in great good, but was opposed to all secret societies. Mr. Hawks replied that there was nothing objectionable in the secret of this order; it is an atttractive feature and a bond of union, and that obligations taken are sacred, and calculated to prvide the highest good of mankind, and if carried out would have a tendency to make society more harmonious. A vote of thanks was passed to the people of East Charlemont for dinners furnished the members. Then adjourned to meet at Charlemont village on Sat. Feb. 27 at 10 o’clock. Topic for discussion: What crops shall we raise, and what stock shall we keep to keep our farms in the best condition and make the most money. M.M. Mantor, Secretary.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Politics, Transportation, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Work, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Sun, Aug 27, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 22, 1875
(Bernardston) A Grange has been formed with Imla K. Brown as Master and Loren Cushman, Secretary.

(Bernardston) A Grange has been formed with Imla K. Brown as Master and Loren Cushman, Secretary.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Clubs, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Sun, Aug 27, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 22, 1875
(Deerfield) The Grange dedicated their new hall on Tues. eve., delegations being present from Greenfield, South Deerfield and other places. The building was formerly the public school house, and has

(Deerfield) The Grange dedicated their new hall on Tues. eve., delegations being present from Greenfield, South Deerfield and other places. The building was formerly the public school house, and has been fitted up for its present uses at an outlay of $1150. The lower floor is occupied by the post office, public library and a store, and the second story comprises a hall, [20?] x 33 ft., and two rooms separated from it by folding doors, so that in case of need nearly 200 people can be seated, while one of the rooms is fitted up with a stove, cooking conveniences, etc. An audience of osme 150 of the chosen, came to the dedicatory services, the principal item of which was the address of Prof. Stockbridge of Amherst. His theme was the position occupied by the farmers, particularly as related to the manufacturing classes. A generous collation was served at the close, with after speeches by D.O. Fisk and Mr. Carpenter of Shelburne, A.K. Warner of Greenfield, Dexter Thayer of Deerfield and others.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Education, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Households, Libraries and Librarians, Mail, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Stores, Retail, Architecture / Construction, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Sun, Aug 27, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 22, 1875
(Deerfield) Professor Walton delivered an address in the new Grange Hall on the eve. of the 11th, upon the subject of the education of children. He is a member of the State Board of Education, and vi

(Deerfield) Professor Walton delivered an address in the new Grange Hall on the eve. of the 11th, upon the subject of the education of children. He is a member of the State Board of Education, and visits the schools throughout the State, to advance the interests of education. The lecture was interesting and instructive, though it will probably be a considerable length of time before some of the very radical ideas expressed will be carried out. At the conclusion of the address the lecturer with the Board of the General School Committee of the village, and invited guests to the number of half a dozen or thereabouts, repaired to the Pocumtuck House where the wants of the inner man were abundantly supplied.
 

Subjects: Children, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Education, Food, Hotels, Massachusetts, Work, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Jul 24, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 15, 1875
(Halifax Vt.) The Grangers claim to have a membership of 100 in town. Now for the millennium.

(Halifax Vt.) The Grangers claim to have a membership of 100 in town. Now for the millennium.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Vermont, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Mon, Jul 24, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 15, 1875
(Halifax Vt.) One of our merchants think the Grangers will not kill him, even if they pierce him with a knife.

(Halifax Vt.) One of our merchants think the Grangers will not kill him, even if they pierce him with a knife.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Economics, Murder, Vendors and Purchasers, Vermont, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Sat, Jul 22, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 15, 1875
(Deerfield) The Grange Hall is to be dedicated Tues. eve., with an address from Prof. Stockbridge and a poem from Miss Tyler of Greenfield, after which a collation will be served.

(Deerfield) The Grange Hall is to be dedicated Tues. eve., with an address from Prof. Stockbridge and a poem from Miss Tyler of Greenfield, after which a collation will be served.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Education, Food, Poetry, Women, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Sat, Jul 22, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 15, 1875
(Deerfield) Preparations for the memorial meeting go on apace. The necessary committees were selected Tues. eve. The Grange kindly voted the use of Grange Hall for the meeting, and if the weather be

(Deerfield) Preparations for the memorial meeting go on apace. The necessary committees were selected Tues. eve. The Grange kindly voted the use of Grange Hall for the meeting, and if the weather be stormy the offer will be accepted and both meetings be held there; but if fair, it is assumed these rooms will be too small, and the business meeting be held at Dr. Crawford's church at 1 o'clock p.m. and the festival at the Town Hall, as usual, where supper will be served at 6 o'clock. At one table, under the supervision of Mrs. Lydia Stebbins and Jena Johnson, genuine "bean porrige" will be served, hot from the historic http://www.americanc...page.jsp?itemid=6441 Aaron Denio dinner pot ; and possibly some 'cold' '9 days old' for those who prefer it, under the recommendation of Mother Goose.The other 'fixins' of this table will correspond. The committee would be glad of contributions of furniture for the table, as a loan for the occasion. The singing will be under the direction of Henry S. Childs.
 

Subjects: Birds, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Fairs, Food, Furniture, Government, History, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Assn, Religion, Spelling, Weather, Women, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Thu, Jun 15, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 8, 1875
Deerfield Valley Farmers' Institute

Deerfield Valley Farmers’ Institute - met at Buckland Center Jan. 29, President D.L. Smith in the chair. J.H. Abbott opened the debate, giving some useful hints in regard to feeding cows, selecting milkers, etc.; said in this selection we should not be governed by size, breed or color: the value of a cow consisted in her capacity to convert food into milk. Col. R.H. Leavitt favored the meeting with excellent remarks upon the subject of dairying, taking it up somewhat in its retrospective and prospective aspects, urging young farmers to make it a specialty. Dr. Josiah Trow spoke of the necessity of gentle treatment, and the bad effect of the opposite upon the milk of the animal, rendering it unfit for food for children, etc. Messrs. Stockwell gave us the benefit of their experiments in feeding different types of grain, the results of which were strongly in favor of corn meal. Stated that they realized a profit of $1.50 to $2 per cow per week; raised the temperature of cream to 60 degrees before churning, etc. Mr. Truesdell of Shelburne gave some practical ideas of the subject: also statistics showing that he makes the business profitable. His product of butter from 9 cows in 1873 was 2185 lbs., cash received for it $381...O.J. Davenport has experimented with cows for setting milk, said cans holding 30 quarts, says the results are satisfactory; stated that he had a Jersey cow that produced 14 lbs. of butter per week. J.J. Dwight thinks that great loss is frequently the result of mixing the milk of different cows, and cited a cse to illustrate: he had a cow that was making 10 lbs. per week; mixed it with the milk of 2 other cows that gave nearly equal quantity with the first, and was unable to make but 12 lbs. And did space allow, should be glad to ntoice many other hints and suggestions of the speakers; the method of curing hay, feeding arrangement of milch cows, etc. The meting was unusually large and interesting. Dr. Josiah Trow thanked the officers and members of the institute on behalf of the people of Buckland for meeting. On motion of Col. R.H. Leavitt, the meeting returned a vote of thanks to the people of Buckland for the cordial reception and entertainment. The meeting then adjourned, to meet at East Charlemont Feb. 13th at 10 o’clock A.M. Topic for discussion: Should we encourage the formation of a Grange in every town, and how can we best market our produce? M.M. Mantor, Secretary.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Beverages, Buckland (MA), Business Enterprises, Charlemont (MA), Children, Clubs, Economics, Elections, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Medical Personnel, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Vendors and Purchasers, Vital Statistics, Work, Superstition, Grange, National


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