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Mar 4, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Russia

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 23, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Foreign

The Grand Duke Alexis of Russia, who married against his father's will, has been restored to royal favor, by obtaining a divorce from his wife. Mean! [Their comment, not mine].
 

Subjects: Divorce, Family, Royalty, Russia

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Heath



The Rev. John C. Edgar will deliver a lecture in the Town Hall at Heath Center on Thurs at 7 o'clock. Subject, The Battle of Bala Clava [Battle of Balaclava] in which will be given a vivid description of the Charge of the Light Brigade which has been immortalized by Tennyson. Price of admission, 25 cents. Mr. Edgar has served 8 years in the Light Brigade...At the close of the lecture, the ladies of the Congregational Society will hold a peach festival, to which all are respectfully invited. The bill of fare will not only consist of peaches, but of the many good things which the ladies of Heath know full well how to prepare for such an occasion. Tickets 50 cents each.

[See Wikipedia for more information on the Battle].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Economics, Food, Light, Literature / Web Pages, Religion, War / Weaponry, Women, Scots and Scotland, Heath (MA), Arabs, Europe, Russia

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Foreign



16,889 persons were banished from Russia to Siberia between May and Oct. last; 1080 women and children over 15 years of age, with 1269 young children voluntarily accompanied the exiles.
 

Subjects: Children, Emigration and Immigration, Prisons, Women, Russia

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Foreign

A somewhat singular discovery has just been made at Buckingham Palace, London. During some alterations, and while the work men were engaged in pulling down a wall, a large quantity of valuable gold and silver plate, of about the time of George III, and supposed to be worth several thousand pounds, was discovered in a place of concealment.
 

Subjects: Economics, English (and England), Lost and Found, Work, Architecture / Construction, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure, Russia

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
A curious chapter

Some historian has told us that when Peter the Great of Russia paid his visit to King Christian of Denmark, he was invited by the Dane to one of his castles which stood on the brink of a deep, wild gorge, into which it is impossible to look without a shudder. While the monarchs were standing on the battlements overlooking the chasm, their conversation turned upon the systems of government they represented, and the power they respectively wielded. Finally the Czar asked the Danish monarch if he would like to have an illustration of the unquestioning obedience he enacted from his subjects, and was told that the illustration would not be unwelcome.

Thereupon the czar called to his side an officer attached to his suite, pointed over the battlement into the terrible gulf below and said "Jump!" The officer turned pale, looked wonderingly up at his sovereign, who only waved his hand and repeated in a more imperious tone, "Jump! sir, jump!" Without another word the unfortunate man sprang from the wall, and was dashed to pieces on the rocks below

[The very long article goes on to state that there still exists almost as much servile compliance in the military and naval services, especially in the British army. Also discusses the great mutiny in Admiral Buckner’s fleet in 1797].
 

Subjects: English (and England), Government, History, Royalty, War / Weaponry, Europe, Russia

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 31, 1875
News about town: Greenfield items

The following list of new books has been recently added to the Greenfield Library: Scottish Song; We and Our Neighbors [by Harriet Beecher Stowe]; Mr. Smith; The Wreck of the Chancellor [by Jules Verne]; Egypt and Iceland; A Winter in Russia; Characteristics from the Writings of J.H. Newman; Theology in the English Poets; Politics for Young Americans; English portraits; Social Life in Greece; The Starling; David Crockett; Invasion of the Crimea, 34 vols.; Strength and Beauty; Outlines of the World’s History; Mistress Judith [by Christina Catherine Liddell]; Gunnar, a Tale of Norse Life; Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations; Annual Record of Science and Industry; Shakespeare Commentaries; The New Hyperion; Manual of Political Ethics; Ismailia, by S.W. Baker; Ancient Law; St. Nicholas.
 

Subjects: Disasters, Education, English (and England), Greenfield (MA), History, Law and Lawyers, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Poetry, Politics, Religion, Science, Transportation, War / Weaponry, Scots and Scotland, Arabs, Geography, Russia

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
The Czar of Russia arrived in Berlin Mon

The Czar of Russia arrived in Berlin Mon. and was received, on alighting at the railway station, by the Emperor William and all the princes of the Emperor's family...
 

Subjects: English (and England), Germans, Rich People, Royalty, Trains, Russia

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 19, 1875
Mme

Mme. Olga de Janina, a Russian princess, having disguised herself in male attire, recently chastised M. Paul Cassagnae of the Paris Pays in a public cafe, because he had severely criticised a book that she had written. [See the story in an article entitled "A new Lola Montez" in the New York Times archive. She actually was a concert pianist, not an author ].
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Food, French, Literature / Web Pages, Masculinity (Machismo), Music, Royalty, Women, Work, Russia, Clothing

Posted by stew - Sun, Jul 2, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 15, 1875
There are upon the continent of Europe fully 6 millions of soldiers. Germany wields 1,684,000, the Russians 1,376,000, the Austrians 865,000, the Italians 741,000, the French 1,000,000; besides some

There are upon the continent of Europe fully 6 millions of soldiers. Germany wields 1,684,000, the Russians 1,376,000, the Austrians 865,000, the Italians 741,000, the French 1,000,000; besides some 280,000 Englishmen. About 3 millions of these troops are all the time under arms, being permanently subtracted from the industrial resources of the nations; the rest as members of reserved corps are only wholly withdrawn from industrial pursuits in times of war. And all this costly preparation is, be it remembered, only preliminary to a far more costly consummation as soon as the http://community-2.w...50thAP-K9/K9History/ dogs of war are let loose.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Economics, English (and England), French, Germans, Italians, Vital Statistics, War / Weaponry, Europe, Russia

Posted by stew - Tue, May 2, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 1, 1875
A curious scene enacted in one of the village courts of the government of Astrachan [i.e. Astrakhan] shows the patriarchal manner in which justice

A curious scene enacted in one of the village courts of the government of Astrachan [i.e. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrakhan Astrakhan ] shows the patriarchal manner in which justice is administered by the peasants among themselves, and the great need there is of education spreading among them. A mother complained of her son's treatment, although he gave her board and lodging and all she could want, and the son said the mother's temper was the sole cause of domestic scenes and courted inquiry among his neighbors. The Judge announced that a mother could not be wrong, that she had a right to treat her son as she pleased, even to beat him. The mother at once put this theory into practice, pulled at her son's hair, and beat him so fiercely that bystanders called her a she-devil and no mother, and all this to the satisfaction of the Judge, who objected even to the young man turning from the blows showered upon him. But at last the woman pardoned her son, and the story ends characteristically with, "but in what consisted the son's fault no one knew".
 

Subjects: Barber / Hair, Courts, Education, Family, Government, Masculinity (Machismo), Women, Russia

Posted by stew - Wed, Mar 1, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 1, 1875
http://cdl.library.c...isid=ACB8727-0018-77 Dean Stanley (an excerpt from Justin McCarthy in the Galaxy for November 1874). He was sent to St. Petersburg to perform the marriage service of the Duke and Duchess of Edinburgh...stands as a sort of medium between our English royal family and literature)...
 

Subjects: English (and England), Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Royalty, Russia

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 30, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 18, 1875
George H. Boker [ George H. Boker [ http://politicalgrav...io/boghos-boker.html George Henry Boker ] has been nominated to succeed Postmaster General Jewell [ http://www.americanp...ewell/printable.html Marshall Jewell ] as United States Minister to Russia. He is a Philadelphian. Since 1871 he has represented the United State's government at Constantinople, having been appointed there as the successor of http://www.tombstone...es/SilverNov1705.pdf Wayne McVeigh .
 

Subjects: Government, Mail, Politics, Urbanization / Cities, Work, Leyden (MA), Russia

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 15, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 11, 1875
It is told of the Empress of Russia that one morning during her stay in Paris her carriage was stopped by the funeral of a very poor person, a young girl being the chief mourner. The Empress, excited

It is told of the Empress of Russia that one morning during her stay in Paris her carriage was stopped by the funeral of a very poor person, a young girl being the chief mourner. The Empress, excited by sympathy, had inquiries made concerning the girl, and the matter resulted in the departure of the latter for Russia in the service of Her Majesty.
 

Subjects: French, Mourning Customs, Poor, Royalty, Transportation, Women, Work, Russia

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 14, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 11, 1875
What good has spiritualism done? Father Evans [possibly What good has spiritualism done? Father Evans [possibly http://www.passthewo...pendium/shaker1x.htm F.W. Evans ], the well known Shaker, replies to this query as follows: "Do you ask what good it has done? It claims to have released the 30 millions of serfs of the http://darkwing.uore...andouts/handout2.htm Russian Empire . If true, is not that glory enough? A friend from Albany, who went with the Palestine company of 70 Americans, was present at a dinner given by the Emperor and Empress, at which the Empress, speaking of Home [ http://paranormal.ab...weekly/aa022403a.htm Daniel Dunglas Home ] - the American Medium - states that it was by direction of spirits through Home, that the Emperor issued the http://wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=ukase ukase freeing the serfs, and to this the Emperor assented. That slavery in America was destroyed by spirit agency I have never doubted. John Brown's soul went marching on, as really as did the army, and he went not alone".
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Food, Law and Lawyers, Poor, Religion, Royalty, Spiritualism, War / Weaponry, Women, Leyden (MA), Russia

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 31, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 4, 1875
Russian homes

http://www.alexanderpalace.org/imperialcity/I.html Russian homes - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theophile_Gautier Theophile Gautier , in his book describing http://www.gutenberg.../12404-h/12404-h.htm "A Winter in Russia" , has the following paragraph showing how the wealthier residents of St. Petersburg protect themselves in their houses against the rigors of the winter: "The windows are invariably double, and the space between the sashes is covered with a layer of fine sand, dsigned to absorb moisture and prevent the frost from silvering the panes. Twisted horns of paper containing salt are set in it, and sometimes the sand is concealed by a bed of moss. There are no outside shutters or blinds, for they would be useless, since the windows remain closed all winter, being carefully filled in around the edges with a kind of cement. One narrow, movable pane serves to admit fresh air, but its use is disagreeable and even dangerous, so great is the contrast (in winter) between the temperature without and that within. Heavy curtains of rich material still further deaden the effect of the cold upon the glass. The temperature within these hermetically sealed houses is kept at 66 or 68 degrees, so that the ladies, if they desire, can dress in the lightest fabrics. The people seem to be intensely fond of flowers , and the well to do cultivate them profusely. http://cityscan.ru/spb/details.php?image_id=551 Flowers receive you at the door and go with you up the stairway; Irish ivies festoon the balusters; jardineres adorn the landing on every floor. In the embrasure of the windows bananas spread out their broad, silken leaves; tallpot palms, magnolias, camelias growing like trees, mingle their blossoms with the gilded volutes of the cornices; orchids hover like butterflies around lamp shades of crystal, porcelain and curiously wrought terra cotta. From horn shaped vases of Japanese porcelain or of Bohemian glass, placed in the center of a table or at the corner of a sideboard, spring sheaves of superb exotics; and all this floral splendor thrives as in a hothouse. In truth, every Russian apartment is a hothouse; in the street, you are at the Pole; within doors, you might believe yourself in the Tropics. Even the wealthier classes retain in a measure certain habits of tent life, which betray the origin of the people. Instead of setting apart chambers for exclusive use as sleeping rooms, a camp bed or low divan is concealed behind a folding screen in one corner, often in the most sumptuous parlors, and upon such resting places the Russian drops down whenever his eyelids happen to be heavy. In the houses of the wealthy the preparation of the food is entirely under the control of French cooks, although a few national dishes still retain their place on the table".
 

Subjects: Astronomy, Curiosities and Wonders, Dreams / Sleep, Eye, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, French, Furniture, Glass / Windows, Households, Ice, Insects, Irish, Japanese, Light, Pottery / Crockery, Rich People, Roads, Trees, Urbanization / Cities, Weather, Women, Architecture / Construction, Russia, Clothing

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 29, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, December 28, 1874
(Greenfield) Great noise about reduction, but prices lowest at McClellans yet. Handk'fs, ties, fancy goods, and holiday gifts. Look!...cloaks and (Greenfield) Great noise about reduction, but prices lowest at McClellans yet. Handk'fs, ties, fancy goods, and holiday gifts. Look!...cloaks and http://kursy.rsuh.ru...meniu=174&razdel=176 Moscow beavers ...under shirts and drawers...our dress goods dep'nt...Charles H. McClellan, East Store, Mansion House block.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Animals / Reptiles, Economics, Fashion, Greenfield (MA), Holidays, Hotels, Noise, Stores, Retail, Russia, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 19, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, December 28, 1874
The Emperor and Empress of Russia wear pretty good clothes. The latter has a red velvet mantle lined with 228 sable skins and valued a

The Emperor and Empress of Russia wear pretty good clothes. The latter has a red velvet mantle lined with 228 http://www.chichesterinc.com/RussianSableSkins.htm sable skins and valued at about $20,000. The Emperor has a http://www.tradersbi...5&action=show_detail cloak of http://www.hongyiqiuge.cn/docc/cfsb.htm blue fox skin worth $24,000.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Economics, Fashion, Royalty, Women, Russia, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Sep 26, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 30, 1874
The Mennonites in Kansas

The http://skyways.lib.ks.us/history/alexwohl.html Mennonites in Kansas - About 2000 http://www.kancoll.org/khq/1977/77_3_juhnke.htm Mennonites have already moved to http://www.kshs.org/tourists/markers.htm Kansas and have located in Topeka temporarily until their lands are ready for them. They have purchased a tract of 150,000 acres situated in the counties of Harvey, Marion, Reno and Sedgwick contiguous to a railroad. They expect in the spring to have houses built for every family. Some of their http://www.bethelks....s/mla/images/leslie/ peculiarities are thus sketched by a correspondent writing from Topeka. "...They are all farmers, and expect to engage in grain and stock raising, but every man among them is the master of some mechanical trade, that being a requirement in their organization. They build their own houses, make their own farming implements and manufacture their own clothing. They have stores of their own, the land is every way managed as far as practical, and they do all their business, in general, inside of their own community. While staying here in Topeka, they have bought quite extensively of household goods and of horses, cattle wagons and other things necessary for the prompt commencement of operations in their new homes. They have probably spent $100,000. They buy carefully and sparingly and display good judgment in making their selections. Their favorite purchases in the household line are washboards and cooking stoves...
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Cults, Economics, Emigration and Immigration, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Furniture, Germans, Horses, Households, Literature / Web Pages, Religion, Stores, Retail, Trains, Vendors and Purchasers, Work, Architecture / Construction, Russia, Clothing

Posted by stew - Sun, Jun 5, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 30, 1874
The infant son of the Duke of Edinburg [i.e. The infant son of the Duke of Edinburg [i.e. http://www.nationmas...ia/Duke-of-Edinburgh Duke of Edinburgh , Duke Alfred of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, second son and fourth child of Queen Victoria] was baptized recently, receiving the name of Albert Alexander Alfred Earnest William [also known as http://www.scotlandr...rchives/r04.html#I95 Prince Alfred ]. The sponsors were Queen Victoria and the Emperor of Russia, who was represented by the Czar Bowitch, the German Emperor, represented by the Duke of Connaught [ http://www.regiments.../royals/1850artC.htm Prince Arthur ], the Prince of Wales, the crown princess of Germany, and the Duke of Saxe Coburg.
 

Subjects: Births, English (and England), Family, Germans, Religion, Royalty, Scots and Scotland, Russia

Posted by stew - Sun, May 29, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 30, 1874
A most disastrous incendiary conflagration, which swept through Cronstadt, Russia [i.e. A most disastrous incendiary conflagration, which swept through Cronstadt, Russia [i.e. http://www.nationmas...ia/Kronstadt,-Russia Kronstadt Russia ] on the night of the 4th, is just reported. 9 squares of houses, including the Gostinai dwar [i.e. http://www.cityvisio...ity_tour/gostiny.htm Gostiny Dvor ] or bazaar, comprising 101 wooden and 18 stone houses, one church, two chapels, 50 shops in the Gostinni dwor [ http://www.costumes.org/TRAVEL/00pages/GOSTINY.HTM Gostiny Dvor ] and 78 shops attached to the marine barracks were completely destroyed, and upwards of 15,000 people rendered homeless. The misery and destitution will be fearful, and committees are being formed in St. Petersburg to assist the sufferers. Cronstadt has no water works. Letters were found threatening similar calamities in other cities. No clew [i.e. clue] to the incendiaries has been discovered. There is much apprehension in St. Petersburg.
 

Subjects: Charity, Charlemont (MA), Crime, Criminals, Fires, Households, Literature / Web Pages, Religion, Urbanization / Cities, Vendors and Purchasers, Russia

Posted by stew - Sun, Apr 17, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 30, 1874
It is rumored that the Russian mission is to be offered to Jam

It is rumored that the http://www.ohiohisto...yes/chapterxxxv.html Russian mission is to be offered to http://www.lib.roche...elot/auth/lowell.htm James Russell Lowell .
 

Subjects: Poetry, Politics, Russia

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 6, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
The reported discovery of a wide spread socialist conspiracy for overthrowing the government is

The reported discovery of a wide spread http://dwardmac.pitz...rchisminrussia1.html socialist conspiracy for overthrowing the government is reaffirmed in special dispatches from St. Petersburg to the London papers. According to the reports many of the most exalted personages of the empire are implicated, and the ramifications of the conspiracy extend to all parts of the country. Over 3000 arrests have been made, including many ladies, some of high rank. A commission of investigation has been appointed by the government, and it is believed that all the conspirators will be brought to justice.
 

Subjects: English (and England), Government, Literature / Web Pages, Police, Politics, Royalty, Telegraphs / Telephones, War / Weaponry, Women, Russia

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 6, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
Austria and Russia have agreed to appoint a commission to define their boundaries.

Austria and Russia have agreed to appoint a commission to define their boundaries.
 

Subjects: Europe, Geography, Russia

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 6, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
Rough on the girls

Rough on the girls - In the government of Pieskan, in Russia, a letter was circulated which reported that the government intended to send 5000 of the prettiest girls of the country to Africa, to be married to negroes. There was a panic, and the girls made haste to marry any one who would have them and there was any number of marriages. One brandy dealer made a sinful profit, for at http://www.norlos.com/terzah/terzah2.html Russian weddings they must have brandy [I bet this has changed to vodka]. Now the authorities have discovered that this merchant started the story and they have not yet done with him.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Government, Marriage and Elopement, Women, Russia

Posted by stew - Sat, Mar 5, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
Antioch has a genuine expelled Russian count. He is 20 years of age, by name Alexis de Perwinoff [also seen as Al

Antioch has a genuine expelled Russian count. He is 20 years of age, by name Alexis de Perwinoff [also seen as http://www.michigan....on_ziehl_98309_7.pdf Alexis A. Perwinoff ]. He is employed in the telegraph office and prefers the California climate to that of Siberia.
 

Subjects: Emigration and Immigration, Royalty, Telegraphs / Telephones, Work, Russia


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