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Sep 19, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Geography

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Greenfield end of the Troy and Greenfield Railroad

The Greenfield end of the Troy and Greenfield Railroad - Messrs. Keith and Barton, Greenfield’s committee to adjust damages with parties on the line of the railroad, have been busy the past week, and have not yet completed their task. Starting from the track of the Connecticut River Railroad, a strip is taken from the Agricultural Fair Ground, the width of which is not yet determined.

A small portion of Mrs. Colle’s lot will probably be taken, and a little from the south side of John Osterhout’s lot and also Judge Aiken’s. A corner is taken from the Catholic premises, but the road will not come within 20 ft. of the new house, or seriously interfere with it. A small piece will be taken from the rear of Miss Lucy Billings’ lot, and the road will then cross lands belonging to the Methodist Society, H.J. Davis, A. DeWolf, L.T. Smith, Mrs. L.W. Rice, John Russell, and William Elliot, running for the most part on a side hill, and not greatly damaging any of the parties.

On E.J. Jones’ premises, it takes a part of his garden; on Dennis W. Jones, a rear lot; a strip of 50 rods, belonging to Charles L. Lowell; a strip fro the open lot adjoining, belonging to Joel Wilson, and also the premises in the rear of it belonging to ____ Merzh. Crossing the avenue, Mrs. Helen M. Pratt’s house stands directly in the way, and her whole lot is purchased. Mrs. Mary B. Coombs owns the remainder of the land to the Green River.

On the other side of Green River, the road will run 400 ft. south of James Newton’s hosue. At this point there will be a fill of 30 ft., which will require an embankment 16 rods wide at the bottom. The distance across the Newton premises is 1800 ft. It strikes the east side of J.M. Munson’s lot, not going within 25 rods of his house, taking from him 5 acres of pine land running through a cut of 33 ft. on the extreme south as it comes to the Deerfield line.

The length of the road on Munson’s land is 78 rods. The line of road is about half way between the old trotting park on Petty’s Plain and the County road west of it, crossing land belonging to the Bird heirs, a small corner of land belonging to Allen Newton, George W. Potter and Washington Jones, then lands of Caleb Jones, George W. Jones, ____ Hartwell, L.B. Wise, Elexis Jones, Charles Wood, Frederick Conant, and then on to the line at West Deerfield.

At Blakeley Hollow, the bed of the road is 23 ft. under the present track, and from that point west, runs on the side hill, a succession of cuts and fills, but nowhere interferes with houses west of Green River. The bridge across Green River is to be a two track iron bridge, 500 ft. long and 80 ft. high. The piers and abutments will have to rest on piles, as an iron rod has been sunk near the river, to the depth of 40 ft., and the ground was found to be soft and treacherous.

The bridge is to be of the first things constructed, and will be sub-contracted to one of the parties who are now making estimates.
 

Subjects: Bridges, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Horses, Households, Parks, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Trains, Trees, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Work, Architecture / Construction, Geography

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 12, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Catamount Hill Coleraine Reunion

The Catamount HIll Coleraine Reunion - The reunion of the present and former members of Catamount Hill, Coleraine occurred on Wed. Sept. 1. There was quite a large gathering of people, and the exercises which were as follows, were interesting and endorsed by those present: Reading of Scriptures by Andrus Shippee [also seen as Andros Shippee], President of the day, from Benjamin Farley’s old family Bible; Prayer by Daniel Davenport, an old resident of the hill; Hymn, Coronation Chronological History, by Dr. A.F. Davenport; Hymn, arranged for the occasion:

"This mountain, ’tis of thee
Land of sweet memory
Of thee we sing
Land where our fathers died
Land of their early pride
Aye from this mountain side
Let music ring.

Our native Mountain, thee
Land of the parent tree
Thy name we love.
We love the rocks and rills
Thy woods and towering hills
Our heart within us thrills
Like that above.

Welcome from Western lands
Thrice welcome in our hands
Ye friends of yore.
From distant home released
To mingle in glad feast
With kindred from the east
As wont before.

Let music swell the breeze
And ring from all the trees
Sweet memory’s song
Let every tongue awake
Let all that breathe partake
Let rocks their silence break
the sound prolong.

Our fathers, God, to thee
The highest praises be
To thee we song
Long may our lives be bright
Protect us by Thy might
Great God our King.

Family History, by Miss Emma Farley; Song, by Miss Gertrude Baker; Old Oaken Bucket, by David Cary; Sixty Years Ago, by Miss Nellie Ives; Dinner; After dinner there were speeches from a number of those present. The following is Dr. Davenport’s http://archiver.root...Y/2001-06/0991943526 address:

Chapter 1

And it came to pass in the reign of George and Martha, that certain tribes of the people who dwelt in many parts of the land, bethought themselves that they would leave their birth right to their brethren, and depart from the land of their fathers and go into a far off country, and make by the sweat of the brow a more noble inheritance, both to themselves and to their children.

And there was in these days a mighty wilderness, and no man kneweth the end thereof. Neither did any man dwell therein, save a few of the wandering tribes of the Gentiles called the "red man". And these did neither plant nor gather into barns; only slay a few wild beasts with the bow and arrow, for they were archers.



And now in the midst of the wilderness arose up even into the heavens an exceedingly high mountain, which was fair to look upon from the plains below, for it was covered with mighty trees even into the brow thereof. And then did roam upon this mountain many wild beasts, but the one that did most abound was one which was very fleet of foot, and did prey upon the lesser beasts of the forest, and upon the flocks of those who journeyed hither, and was called the catamount, and the region did very much abound in rocks which were the fastnesses of these beasts, and there was a cave which did reach even to the bowels of the earth in which these beasts did make their dens, and so much had they increased and multiplied that they were a terror to the coming tribes of the mountains, wherefore that place is called Catamount HIll to this day.

Chapter 2

Now the names of some of the tribes who first journeyed hither were these: Aaron, whose surname was Cary, Israel and Peter, and Amasa of the tribe of Shippee. Alden, who was also named Willis. Elihu of the tribe of Holden, and Paul, who was also called Davenport. And these said among themselves, come, let us get up and make some war upon the forests, and drive out the wild beasts, and make unto ourselves habitations.

And all the elders of the tribes said they would do so, for the thing was right in the eyes of all the people. And Aaron said unto Jemima, his wife, come, let us gather ourselves together, even from the middle of the Borough, and let us with our children travel westward, and they came and took up their abode upon the east side of the mountain.

And behold Hezekiah, whose surname was Smith, dwelt also on the east side of the mountain, even unto the entering in of the wilderness from the river. And their flocks were multiplied, for they dwelt among plants and hedges. And Peter went up and Amasa and all lsrael unto this mountain, and the tribe of Farly.

And Anan, also called Bass, went with Joseph, whose surname was Farnsworth, and they dwelt near together in the hollow according to their generations. And in those days came Paul and Alice, his wife, and they made war upon the wild beasts of the forests, and they pitched their tent and dwelt at the border thereof, where they cleared the land and had green pastures, and their flocks and herds were multiplied and they also begat children, whose names were Zacheus, Thomas and Paul, Daniel and Levi; and they also had daughters given unto them: Lydia, Sally and Alice.

And now Alice lay sick of a fever, and great fear came upon the whole household for she was nigh unto death. And Paul saddled his beast and did go for one Nathaniel, who dwelt in the valley by the river, and whose appellation was "Dr. Nat". And he came with saddlebags and he gave unto her pills of buckthorn and aloes,and the drink of herbs, queen of the meadow, motherwort and sarsaparilla, and after many days she recovered, and great rejoicing came upon all the household.

And behold Nathaniel found that she was fair to look upon, and he said, come in unto me and let us dwell together. And Alice said, I will go; and they went to dwell at the head of the meadow, in a house builded by one Artemas and Ruth. And now it came to pass after this, Joel, one of the Chiefs, and Zenas, the son of Cary, sent messengers to Nathaniel, and timbers of cedar, with masons and carpenters to build him a barn. And they builded it 40 cubits long; the stable thereof was 10 cubits, and a threshing floor 10 cubits and 20 cubits for a bay.

Chapter 3

Now it came to pass in those days, as Aaron sat in his house, that Aaron said to Jemima, his wife: "Behold, our meal getteth low, and our children hunger for bread, give unto me! I pray thee a bag that I may fill it with corn and go to the grinders". And Jemima said, go do all that is in thy heart. And Aaron arose and went. And it came to pass as he was journeying homeward from the mill, the even was come and darkness fell upon the whole land, and a great fog encompassed him about, and his way was lost. And Aaron lifted up his voice and cried aloud "Jemima! Jemima!! JEMIMA!!!"

Now Jemimah heard the cry of Aaron and answered, In here am I. But he heard her not, for her voice was weak. So she straightway took a stick and beat vehemently upon the side of the house, and Aaron hearing the sound thereof hastened homeward. Now the sons of Aaron were Zenas and Levi, but Levi died before his father and had no children. And the children of Zenas and Sally, his wife, who were of the tribe of Maxam, were these: Charlotte and Mariettie, John and George, William, David and Levi, 7 in all.

But the days of Mariettie on the earth were as a shadow, and she was not, for God took her; and Charlotte had wisdom and knowledge granted unto her, and she came in and went out before the children and taught them. And the sons of Zenas were skillful to work in stone and in timber and in tilling the land.

And behold, William was wiser than the others about bees, and the queens of Italia, and did make unto himself a great name. And David, like one of old, was a mighty man and a slayer of beasts and of cattle, and behold, the flesh thereof he did keep in markets, and with it he did feed the tribes of Aaron.

And now after many days it came to pass that Aaron and Jemima, being full of years, died. And Zenas and Sally reigned in their stead.

Chapter 4

Now Amasa, Israel and Peter were the three divisions of our tribe, who came to dwell in the hill country and they went even unto the top of the mountain and sought pastures for their flocks. Even over against the habitations of the wild beasts. And behold the house of Amasa increased greatly, and Andrus, Nancy, Jesse, Alvira and Jerusha, Henry, Chauncey, Nathan, Thankful and Kate, all these mentioned by their names, were the children of Amasa and Rhoda.

And after these days Rhoda saith unto Amasa, behold how our house has been multiplied, let us enlarge our borders, I pray thee, that there may be room in our house to dwell there. And this saying pleased Amasa and he straightway brought his cattle and his oxen, and gathered stones and timber and did build him an house, such as one as had not been there before him. He also made shingles of cedar and spruce and covered his house therewith.

Now Amasa was a man of great stature, even 5 cubits high. And Rhoda wrought fine linen and kersey, and with it did make clothes for her family and for Andrus, her first born. For behold, Rhoda was an helpmeet unto Amasa.

Now the children of Israel were Ira, Zovia, Azuba, Anan, Amasa, Catherine, Abraham, Israel, Martha and one younger called Darling. Now the children of Ira, the first born, were these: Delana, Dordana and Diana, and a son, a shepherd, who died in his youth. And Ira spake unto Dilla, his wife, to appoint their daughters to be the singers. So the daughters were appointed, and with their neighbors did often make merry with corn huskings and apple pearings [probably meant parings] with playing and dancing, making great noise with viols and with harps.

And it came to pass in these days that George took wives from the daughters of Ira, and went to dwell with Zenas, his father. And Zenas saith "Unto thee will I give the land of our fathers, even the house of Aaron, for the lot of thine inheritance" and he abode there many days. And George had exceeding much riches and honor, and he made himself treasures of silver and gold. Also storehouses for the increase of corn and stalls for all manner of beasts, and cotes for flocks, for God had given him substance very much.

And George prospered in all his works, and now sleeps with his fathers; and they buried him in the chiefest of the sepulchres of the sons of Aaron. And all the inhabitants of the hill town did him honor at his death, and Clark, his son, reigned in his stead.

And behold, Ira dwelt many years upon the mountain heights, well content with his lot. And one door of his house opened southward, and he was wont to remove his waistcoat and tarry long, even in the heat of the sun. Before his door, even near the steps thereof, the sweet-heart which Dilla had planted and watered waxed strong. And the sunflower towered high, even 6 cubits, and their fowls, their geese and their turkeys did gather in the shade thereof.

After these things it came to pass that Ira was stricken with a malady too grievous to be borne, and he died and rested with his father. And Dilla went to dwell in the house of her daughter, near the banks of the river; and in fullness of time she died. And behold, now the house of Ira was left desolate.

Chapter 5

And it came to pass in those days that Peter saw that it was not good for man to dwell alone. Now Dorcas was of the tribe of the Pikes, and Peter saw that she was fair, and he said unto her: "Dorcas, if you love me less buss [?] and they went to dwell together; and they builded them an house near the brook by the side of a rock, and nigh unto the habitations of Paul and of Levi. And lo! a mighty storm arose and it beat vehemently upon the house, but it fell not for it was founded by the rock, and darkness was upon the whole land for it was night.

And lo! while Peter and Dorcas slept, a thunderbolt descended from the heavens and did rend the house, and even the bed whereon they slept! and behold, it did divide in twain the soap trough, and did scatter the contents broadcast over the house and the children. And the dog and the swine were killed, and grat fear came upon all the household. And Peter arose and spake unto Dorcas, his wife, "Come, let us arise and give thanks unto the Lord, for he has been merciful unto us; He has saved us from the mighty judgments of the Lord".

And the next day was the Sabbath, and many people gathered in the house of the Lord, and as they went, they tarried at the house of Peter and Dorcas, and with them did offer up thankofferings [sic] that they were saved from the terrors of the thunderbolt, and He had made their lives precious in his sight. And Peter gathered with all the people in the house of the Lord, and Myres, the Elder, arose and said "The Lord hath been good unto his people; yea, He hath showed a great mercy even unto the house of Peter".

So Peter arose and sang a hymn:

"God moves in a mysterious way,
His wonders to perform
He plants his footsteps in the sea
And rides upon the storm".

And all the people said amen. And the Lord blessed Peter and his seed was multiplied: Peter, Susie, Rolly and Fanny, Annie,, Josiah, Patience, Eliza, Paul, Silas and Mila. These were his children - 11 in all.

Chapter 6

And it came to pass in those days that Daniel the prophet was joined to one of the tribe of Barnes, and her name was Patty: and Daniel was famous in his time as an expounder of the Scriptures, mighty in speech, and all the people came to hear him declare the truth on his day. And behold, he was sorely distressed, inasmuch as his substance was oftimes destroyed by fire, and desolation came upon his whole household.

And Daniel humbled himself before the God of his fathers, and the Lord favored Daniel and greatly blessed his household. And these were the sons of Daniel: David, Thomas, Alonzo, Orrie, Tirtious and Hiram; but the names of his daughters were Lucinda, Emily and Caroline. And it came to pass that these all went by themselves in families, some even to the four quarters of the earth, but David and Lucinda did abide near the house of their father.

And after these days Patty the Prophetess died, and Daniel lamented sore. But in process of time, it came to pass that Mary entered into Daniel’s house, and lo! there was restored unto him sevenfold in Mary, who was greater by far than all his former household. For since the time of the fathers there was not found the like in all the tribes of the mountain.

Chapter 7

Now it came to pass that Abraham, the son of Farnsworth, dwelt in the house of Joseph; and after many days Joseph died and Abram [sic] reigned in his stead, with Dolly, who was of the house of Holden. Now Abram was a tiller of the land, and behold, he was barefooted on the top of his head, as was also his father before him. And it came to pass that Orin was pleased with Roxy, the daughter of Abram, and he took her to wife, and they went to dwell in the house left by Nathaniel; and after many days Orin died, and Roxy tarried and reigned there.

And Riley, her brother, did dwell in the house of their father Abram. Now Dolly’s two brothers, Elihu and John, dwelt also on the south side of the mountain near the house of Anan, whose surname was Bass, and behold Anan had an impediment in his speech, and when he was old and infirm he rested from his labors; and Adna and Rebecca reigned there many years after.

Chapter 8

And it came to pass that Abram, the son of Shippee, said unto himself, Behold, I myself am a man, and I will leave even the house of my father Israel. And he married a wife from the tribe of Farley, and her name was Lucy, and they builded them an habitation and dwelt on the north side of the mountain. Now there were daughters born unto them (but behold the son shone not his face in all their household).

Fanny, Jane and Nancy, Martha, Almira and Parthena were the names of the daughters of Abraham. And it came to pass that when men did multiply on the mountains, and daughters were born unto them, that the sons saw the daughters, that they were fair, and they took them wives of all which they chose. And one, a Levite, took the firstborn of Abram; and behold all the daughters were scattered abroad. And after the death of Lucy desolation came upon the whole house. And again, after many days, Abram was joined to another and went to dwell near the plains, in an Ashfield.

Chapter 9

And it came to pass that Peter, the brother of Paul and Silas, said unto Polly, let us pitch our tent and dwell near the house of our fathers, for so it seemeth good. And now behold near by their habitation was a dense swamp, and Peter was a man of great daring, and he fain would have walked upon the surface thereof, but his faith was weak, for there was much water there.

And behold a great calamity fell upon Peter, inasmuch as his nose was divided asunder and one of his eyes were blinded by the kick of old Gilpin, and Peter was sore discouraged, and all his household; and he said unto Polly, "Come, let us journey into a far country, where peradventure we shall find greener pastures for our flocks, and a richer inheritance for our children".

And they went on their journey and Nathaniel possessed the land. And behold Nathaniel was a man of great stature and of large understandings, and he was wont to remove the coverings thereof, and to tarry long among the eels and turtles that did much abound in the meadow ditches.

Now the length of this meadow, and the breadth thereof, was exceedingly great, and in it were many islands, both great and small, covered with trees and shrubs, and with herbs; and lo, Nathaniel and Alice were wont to go out and bring in of the abundance thereof in their season; for behold Nathaniel was a disciple of Hippocrates, and was possessed of the healing art in a great degree; and he had vessels of wood and of iron in which he did compound medicines for the cure of divers maladies.

And now it came to pass when the harvest was ended, and winter drew near, Nathaniel spent the long evenings thereof making baskets of willow, and hooping the sieves which Alice did weave from hair, and did bind with the leaves of the flag. And now Robert, their firstborn, was skillful to work in brass and in iron, and to grave all manner of graving, and to find out any device that was put to him.

And lo, it came to pass that he was pierced with a chisel, and so were his days numbered. And now Nathaniel’s 4th son was called Truair, after one, a high priest, who traveled the circuit of the hill country. Now Truair did in habits much resemble his father; he was a tiller of the ground, and he bethought himself that he would journey in a far country, where he might find more fertile fields; and he bought a parcel of land where he spread his tent.

And there his possessions increased much. And it came to pass in the sixth month - the month Sivan - that he was cultivating the land, when lo, there descended upon him a thunderbolt; and he was taken up dead, and they buried him in the field of burial, in the land of strangers.

And now it came to pass that there was born unto Nathaniel a daughter, and her name was called Lydia. Now Nathaniel and Alice did set their hearts upon her, because she was their only daughter, and well favored. So Lydia dwelt in her father’s household until his death. And she did many things that were praiseworthy, for behold she was a woman zealous of good works. And after many days it came to pass that Lydia was beloved by one Emerson, of the tribe of Cary, and they dwelt henceforth with the Adamonians.

Now Ammon, Joseph, and Jason were also of the household of Nathaniel, and behold they were diligent in sowing wild oats among the rooks and the hedges, and even over the ridgepole of the houses and barns. And after they were well brushed in, it came to pass that they did leave their father’s house, and did join themselves into the society of the Odentologues. And behold they were skillful in the making of gold and silver and of ivory, and did make appliances of cunning device and workmanship, which did even eat and speak for themselves; and all the Edentulous did greatly rejoice.

So they were very diligent in repairing the crumbling incisors, bicuspids and molars, and in all that, pertained to "restoring the contour of the human face divine". And behold one went to dwell with the Gothamites, by the border of the sea; but Joseph builded him an habitation in the Norwood of the Connecticut. and lo, it came to pass, that the house of Ammon was sawn asunder, and again, after many days, it was joified and perfected; and the household of Ammon did rejoice greatly in that they did dwell in broader fields, even in the "valley view" of the winding Hoosac River.

Chapter 10

And it came to pass that Levi was a shepherd born (not made) and behold to him fell the inheritance of Paul his father, and he took up his abode there, and did build him an house of hewn logs and timber. Now the house of Levi was more comely than that of Paul, inasmuch as it was broader and higher and was divided into diverse compartments for the convenience of his family. And behold Susan was exceeding glad and said, Come now, let us build storehouses for our flocks, houses for bees, and also for our cheese.

And now Levi was a man of great cunning and he was skillful int he hiving of bees, and their swarms did greatly increase and behold their household did flow with milk and honey. Now Levi possessed lands in great abundance, and his pastures did much abound in rocks and stones, and no beast could feed thereon, save that their noses were well sharpened. So their pastures did run over with sheep and with lambs, both great and small.

And in these days it came to pass that Levi and Susan did take in abundance of the first fruits of flocks, and of cheese and of honey, and of all the increase of the fields, and the tithe of all these things brought them in abundantly, and their coffers were filled with gold and silver. And behold Levi begat great honor unto himself, inasmuch as he tarried long to possess the lands of his fathers.

Chapter 11

And it came to pass that sundry members of Amasa’s household did journey westward; and one of the daughters tarried just over the mountain, and was joined to one David whose surname was Ives. And Kate, the younger, did worship the son of Simeon the Myres, and again she was made one of the tribe of Benjamin. And behold after many days she did return to the house of her father.

Now Nathan did much resemble his father in that he was tall and of a comely countenance, and he went to dwell in the Hub, where he did dispense to the tribes thereof of the milk of human kindness.

And now Chauncey the brother of Nathan was exceeding tall, even 5 cubits and over. And it came to pass in the reign of King Winter, when he did give his snow like wood, and did scatter his ice like morsels, and his hoar frost like ashes, that one Barton did gather together all the children of the hill tribes saying: harken ye unto me, and I will dispense unto you knowledge and wisdom, and learning in great abundance.

And now much learning did make Chauncey mad, and so he did sit down heavy upon his seat, and low the teacher was sore vexed, and commanded Chauncey that he rise and sit down again. And lo, Chauncey did all that was commanded him in that he did sit down threefold heavier than before, whereupon the teacher did rend his clothes and he drew forth a raw hide and with it Chauncey was beaten with many stripes until the ire of his wrath was kindled.

And behold he leaped over the counter and seized the teacher by the throat, and held him down until he begged for his life. And behold they armed themselves with shovels and with tongs, that they might be defended against the assaults of each other, and there arose a great tumult, and all the children quaked with fear and trembling. And it came to pass that when the noise of these things went abroad, Joel, Zenas and Levi consulted together, and Mary, the daughter of Smith reigned in his stead.

And now Andros the first born of Amasa was a captain and a man of great might, in that he did brave the storms and tempests of the mountain; he was also a man of great courage and daring in that he did dwell many years nearer the lions than any of the other tribes of the mountain; even after all his father’s household had forsaken him and gone. Now Andros did search diligently among all the daughters of the hill country, but found not one who would do him honor. So he chose to dwell alone in single blessedness, and verily he shall not lose his reward.

Chapter 12

Now it came to pass in those days that Alice said unto Emily, Behold, how sin doth abound, and the love of many doth wax cold. Come, let us assemble ourselves together, there am I in their midst. So they took their hymn books and journeyed to the old school house and lighted their candle and placed it under a bushel, but on a candlestick, that it might give light unto all the house. Then after Alice had arisen from her knees they did sing an hymn. And Emily arose and said "Behold, this is the house of the Lord, let us assemble often together"; so Alice lifted up her voice and said "Amen" and they departed to their own households.

And it came to pass that the noise of these things did spread abroad throughout all the region round about. And behold all the tribes of the hill country were greatly moved and they came together by scores and by hundreds. Now Haynes, one of the elders of the people arose, and behold he was like unto Saul the son of Kish, in that he was taller by head and shoulders than the rest of the people, and he cried with a loud voice "Brethren and sisters, hearken unto me". and a great silence fell upon all the multitudes and he said "behold we are all gathered together from near and from far, let us give thanks unto the Lord, sing psalms unto his name".

Now Daniel, whose surname was Dwight, broke forth into singing:

"My chains fell off: glory! I cried
Was it for sinners Jesus died etc. etc. [sic]"

And all the people said amen and amen. And Zenas, who was greatly beloved by all the people, arose and said "Blessed be the Lord God of Israel forever and ever". And behold he did free his mind of a great burden which lay heavily upon it in that he did tell to the brethren and sisters that "he dreamed a dream; and it amounted even unto a vision". And all the people gave ear unto him, and after he had sat down behold Alice broke forth into singing:

"Oh that my load of sin were gone".

And scarcely had the voice of singing died away, when Sarah the Prophetess, the daughter of Hanshaw arose, and as she spoke a great silence fell on all the multitude for she spake of one Joel who had been suddenly taken to his death.

Now all the brethren and sisters knew and loved Joel, and they did mourn sincerely for him. And when these words sounded in their ears, their hearts were filled with sorrow; and they expressed themselves in singing mournfully. And it came to pass that Rebecca arose. Now Rebecca was a woman greatly beloved, and all the people gave ear to her as she said "It rejoiceth my heart greatly to meet with the brethren and sisters, who have come from near and from far". And when she had sat down all the people said amen.

Presently Peter arose, and his head was white and glistening, and a halo glowed around it, and his face did shine even as the light; and he blessed God with all his heart and soul; and behold, all his kinsfolk and neighbors became as lambs for quietness. But Per was greatly beloved, and when he had made an end of his sayings, he sang with a loud voice:

"On Jordan’s stormy banks I stand
And cast a wishful eye
To Canaan’s fair and happy land
Where my possessions lie".

And after this Samuel whose surname was Brown, arose and opened his mouth and said unto them "Men and brethren, it is with me as with Naaman the Syrian, when Elisha bade him go wash in Jordan; yea, more, it was as if the Jordan had been frozen over, and he had been bidden to go wash 7 times in the river. But he essayed the task, and said "Behold I have been ashamed of my brethren in the days that are past, but now do I greatly rejoice to see them zealous of good works". And Nathan, the son of Burns arose, and all the people knew that he had somewhat to say.

And Nathan said "He felt somewhat cold and lukewarm" and sat down, and all the people broke frorh into singing:

"Come Holy spirit heavenly dove
With all thy quickening powers
Kindle a flame of sacred love
In these cold hearts of ours"

And now it came to pass that Daniel the prophet arose. Now behold he was a prophet born (not made) and when the spirit seizeth him, the voice of Daniel was like the balm of Gilead, even like precious ointment upon their heads, that ran down upon the beard; even Aaron’s beard that went down to the skirts of his garments.

Now after this it came to pass that the hour was late and Myres the elder arose, and behold he was halt, and like Samson of old his locks were long and flowing. And he said "My brethren and sisters, if any man does ought to his neighbor, he must go to him and make restitution, or he can never enter into the pearly gates of the New Jerusalem". and all the people said amen and amen.

Now what shall I say more, for the time would fail me, to speak of Sister Farley and others who through faith wrought righteousness and obtained the promise. So after they had sung an hymn, they all departed and slept. And as for the rest of the doings of the tribes, are they not all written in the chronicles of our memory?
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Ashfield (MA), Barber / Hair, Beverages, Birds, Births, Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Cemeteries, Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Connecticut, Cosmetics, Dance, Diseases, Dreams / Sleep, Education, Emigration and Immigration, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
The horrors of idolatry

The horrors of idolatry - Miss Harriet Brittan is writing some interesting letters depicting life in India, to the "Christian at Work". From a recent one we make the following extract in which she describes a religious gathering: "And now to turn to a sad sight witnessed during my visit to Allahabad...".

[Long article discusses diseased beggars, religious pilgrims who come once a year to bathe and shave at this spot. She describes one street "which appeared to be entirely devoted to fakirs...men who are supposed by self-inflicted tortures to have become very holy...They were about the vilest creatures that it is possible to describe; it made you shudder to think that humanity could be so degraded...These men were almost all of them almost entirely nude - none of them had any covering but one filthy little piece of rag, not more than a fig leaf...

Their hair and beards were all long and matted with filth, their bodies smeared with a mixture of cow dung and ashes; some of them had a thick mixture of whitewash or white plaster, with 1, 2 or 3 broad stripes, like, blood, down the forehead...One man...sat in a bed of ashes, with 4 fires built around him on either side; not of course close enough to burn him, but close enough to scorch him and cause great suffering...

There was another, a miserable looking creature, who for many years had held his arms up over his head with his hands crossed. At first when he began to do this, he was obliged to have his hands bound to poles, to keep them up until they stiffened in that position...

[Check out Fakir in Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Barber / Hair, Charity, Cults, Diseases, Fires, Food, Garbage, Literature / Web Pages, Magic and Magicians, Outhouses, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Women, Stunt performers, Geography, Clothing, Water

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
The search for the North Pole



Short article. [See the article entitled "British Arctic Expedition" Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: English (and England), Explorers, Literature / Web Pages, Geography

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
What savages think of twins

In Africa according to Dr. Robert Brown ("Races of Mankind") the birth of twins is commonly regarded as an evil omen. No one, except the twins themselves and their nearest relatives, is allowed to enter the hut in which they first saw light. The children are not to play with other children, and even the utensils of the hut are not permitted to be used by any one else.

The mother is not allowed to talk to any one not belonging to her own family. If the children both live till the end of the 6th year, it is supposed that Nature has accommodated herself to their existence, and they are thenceforth admitted to association with their fellows. Nor is this abomination of twin births restricted to Africa.

In the island of Bali, near Java, a woman who is so unfortunate as to bear twins is obliged, along with her husband, to live for a month at the sea shore or among the tombs, until she is purified. The Khasias of Hindostan consider that to have twins assimilates the mother to the lower animals, and one of them is frequently put to death.

An exactly similar belief prevails among some of the native tribes of Vancouver Island. Among the Ainos, one of the twins is always killed, and in Arebo in Guinea, both the twins and the mother are put to death (Popular Science Monthly).
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Animals / Reptiles, Birth Control, Births, Cemeteries, Children, Crime, Curiosities and Wonders, Cutlery, Family, Households, Light, Literature / Web Pages, Luck, Murder, Native Americans, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Science, Women, Superstition, Canada, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
A prehistoric relic in California

A piece of fossilized oak has been found in the South Fork Tunnel, near Forest City, Sierra County, Calif., which is very evidently a trace of prehistoric man. It had been shaped, while in the woody state, into a block some 20 inches long by 14 wide and 5 deep, with squarely cut edges. The spot where it was found is 1800 ft. from the mouth of the tunnel and at a vertical depth from the surface of the mountain of 800 ft.

Other discoveries pointing to the existence of man in remote ages have been made in various sections of the course of the great river which must once have flowed across the present course of the Sierra River system. In 1858 a number of fossilized pine logs, 7 ft. long and in diameter that had been neatly sawed and piled up together, were found in the Allegheny Tunnel under the bed of the "Old Blue River". The recently found relic has been given to the California State University.
 

Subjects: Archaeology, Education, History, Lost and Found, Native Americans, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Trees, Work, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Orange

A map of Packard's lot, on Grove Street, has been made by Herman Dexter. This is a most desirable location for a permanent residence, and many have already established themselves there. The immediate neighborhood, though somewhat densely populated, is a remarkably quiet one, and no spot could be found better suited for a resting place from the noise and confusion of the outside world.
 

Subjects: Households, Noise, Orange (MA), Roads, Geography

Posted by stew - Fri, Dec 12, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Shopping on the upper Nile

Short passage from "Passing the cataract of the Nile" by Charles Dudley Warner in the July Atlantic.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Literature / Web Pages, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Vendors and Purchasers, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 8, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 12, 1875
The New Granada earthquakes

Mail advices received from different places in Columbia [i.e. Colombia] more than confirm the horrors of the earthquakes in New Granada in May last. In Cucuta alone over 10,000 people were killed, in addition to other thousands who were seriously injured. Everything in the place is in ruins - not a house remains standing, and to add to the horrors, thieves and robbers from the surrounding country have swept down upon the stricken place and despoiled the remnants of inhabitants of what little they had saved from the general wreck...
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Criminals, Disasters, Households, Latin America, Mail, Obituaries, Robbers and Outlaws, Geography

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
Brief notes of a pleasant excursion

The Massachusetts Press Association left Boston on the morning of June 23, for their annual excursion. The party, including ladies, numbered almost 90...On this excursion two first class cars and a smoking car on the Boston & Albany road were devoted to the exclusive use of the excursionists...The sandwiches, cakes, etc. were neatly packed in pasteboard boxes for each individual, and were liberally accompanied with iced lemonade.

At Albany...there was a change to the fine cars of the New York Central Railroad, and we were soon steaming with almost lightning rapidity through the beautiful Mohawk Valley. The flat farm lands here are of an unsurpassing fertility. There does not appear to be an acre that is not under cultivation....The Mohawk runs parallel with the road for many miles, and on the opposite side of the river is the Erie Canal. The latter, which has been one of the great institutions of the Empire State for many years, appears to New Englanders to be a rather slow method of transportation. The canal boats, which we pass in quick succession, seem hardly to move, so snail like is the progress which they make, but what is lost in time is saved in expense. If it was not for the Erie our coal and grain would never approach the present low prices, and upon it has depended largely the wealth and development of the great Western States.

But...the day was fearfully hot, and our excursion cars were in the rear of a very large train; and the dust and cinders that poured into the windows soon blackened our faces, filled our eyes and ears, so that when we reached Syracuse about 8 o’clock in the eve., after a ride of 350 miles, we were a sad looking set, more like a band of miners from the coal region, than people who patronized soap and water. We were, however, nicely quartered at the Globe and Vanderbilt hotels and through the transforming influences of the bath, clean linen, and a good supper, were soon ourselves again.

The party left Syracuse soon after 6 the next morning, by the Auburn branch of the New York Central. At Auburn we got the chance to see the extensive buildings of the State Penitentiary, but did not stop for a close inspection of the establishment. A short ride brought us to the wharf at Cayuga, where we embarked on a small steamer for a delightful trip of 38 miles through Cayuga Lake...

With song and mirth the happy excursionists were soon on the top wave of enjoyment. At Goodwin’s Point a landing was made and the party visited Taghkanic Falls To reach the Falls we climbed a steep descent of a mile, under a broiling sun, and were hardly, when we reached the summit, in the most favorable mood to fully appreciate this wild freak of nature. These falls are on a small stream, and 215 ft. in perpendicular height, while the rocky gorge is nearly 400 ft. down.

It is a wild and picturesque spot, but at this season there is not a large flow of water over the fall. A hotel has been built upon the summit, within a stone’s throw of the fall, and it is quite a resort for excursionists and picnic parties.... Afterwards we landed at the beautiful town of Ithaca, at the head of the lake. the principal business here is apparently the transferment of coal. The coal is brought by rail from the mines in Pennsylvania and transshipped to the canal boats, which convey it across the lake and thence through the canal to the Eastern markets. Our quarters were at the Ithaca Hotel, a first class house...After a sumptuous dinner, carriages were provided for a visit to Cornell University.

The college buildings occupy a beautiful site overlooking the lake, and can be seen miles away...The college was opened in 1868, and everything about the premises is neat and new...The founder of the college, Ezra Cornell, Esq. endowed the institution with more than three millions of dollars...Our party assembled in the Library of the college, and were addressed by President White...It was the purpose of Mr. Cornell to found a university where any person could find instruction in any study, and well has his purpose been carried out. It recognizes no distinct religious belief, though its aim is to promote Christian civilization...

Upon the grounds an opportunity is afforded, as at our Agricultural College, for the practical study of agriculture. There is a carpenter shop, furnished with power and machinery, where students who have tastes in that direction can cultivate their skill in wood work. A large machine shop is fitted with lathes and a variety of machinery and tools, and we found here a dozen or more young men hard at work with sleeves rolled up, dressed in colored shirts an overalls, hands and faces begrimmed, just like "greasy mechanics".

Several valuable inventions have been made in this shop, and much of this work is put to a practical use. In the same building is a printing shop with a large assortment of type and presses...Cornell University recognizes the co-education of the sexes. Young ladies are admitted on the same footing as young men, and are advanced through the same studies...the young men, who at other colleges have been accustomed to practices that were vulgar and demoralizing have voluntarily given them up since the admission of the young ladies, and so far from the mingling of the sexes leading to unpleasant talk and scandal, as some had predicted, not a breath of suspicion of anything out of character had ever existed...

Before leaving the college grounds we were driven to Fall Creek Gorge a wild, romantic locality, where the waters of a small stream leap and splash over the rocks of a wild ravine in its mad course to the lake below. We left Ithaca at 7 in the eve. over the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad, the President of which is Gen. W.I. Burt, the Postmaster of Boston. General Burt had accompanied our party, and we were indebted to his kind attention and influence for many courtesies. On this road we pass through Elmira, and about 10 o’clock at night, in the midst of a drenching rain, arrived at the town of Watkins at the head of Seneca Lake. After a little confusion we were provided with carriages and driven through the pitchlike darkness up the steep ascent to the Glen Mountain House [See the NYPL Digital Gallery for great photos], which has been erected above the famous Watkins Glen.

There is no natural wonder on the American continent, with the exception perhaps, of Niagara Falls, that surpasses the Glen...Says Bayard Taylor: "In all my travels I have never met with scenery more beautiful and romantic than that embraced in this wonderful Glen, and the most remarkable thing of all is that so much magnificence and grandeur should be found in a region where there are no ranges of mountains...It is only since 1869 that the Glen has been accessible to the public...[A very large section follows about the Glen and its hotels. To be continued next week].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Beverages, Boston (MA), Canals, Clubs, Coal, Cosmetics, Curiosities and Wonders, Economics, Education, Eye, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Greenfield (MA), Horses, Hotels, Ice, Inventions, Libraries and Librarians, Lightning, Mail, Massachusetts, Mines and Mineral Resources, Natural Resources

Posted by stew - Wed, Dec 3, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
Cawnpore

Long article about an Indian town, 750 miles from Calcutta. Also seen as Kanpur.
 

Subjects: Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 21, 1875
Earthquakes in Iceland

Long article.
 

Subjects: Accidents, Disasters, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 21, 1875
Whitingham, Vt.

The geology of Whitingham may yet serve to us an attraction, and a visit at some future day, among its boulders, to its gold and silver mine, may compensate for all our pleasure in the forthcoming future. Our greatest boulder measures 43 ft. in length, and 30 in height and width, or 40,000 cubic ft. in bulk, and was probably transported across Deerfield Valley, the bottom of which is 500 ft. below the spot where it lies.

/ There is also another one not quite as large on the farm of Mr. Thomas Fowler, 40 ft. in length, and [?] in height, 5 in width, shaped like an anvil, and for some unknown cause is called the "Devil's Anvil", also there are many others around of every shape and size, probably drifted from the higher latitudes to these lower, from some convulsion of nature. There can also be seen perpendicular precipices from 20 to 30 ft. in height and would well pay one for an hour's visit to this farm, situated one mile west from Jacksonville.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Jokes, Mines and Mineral Resources, Names, Religion, Science, Vermont, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 31, 1875
News about town: Greenfield items

The following list of new books has been recently added to the Greenfield Library: Scottish Song; We and Our Neighbors [by Harriet Beecher Stowe]; Mr. Smith; The Wreck of the Chancellor [by Jules Verne]; Egypt and Iceland; A Winter in Russia; Characteristics from the Writings of J.H. Newman; Theology in the English Poets; Politics for Young Americans; English portraits; Social Life in Greece; The Starling; David Crockett; Invasion of the Crimea, 34 vols.; Strength and Beauty; Outlines of the World’s History; Mistress Judith [by Christina Catherine Liddell]; Gunnar, a Tale of Norse Life; Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations; Annual Record of Science and Industry; Shakespeare Commentaries; The New Hyperion; Manual of Political Ethics; Ismailia, by S.W. Baker; Ancient Law; St. Nicholas.
 

Subjects: Disasters, Education, English (and England), Greenfield (MA), History, Law and Lawyers, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Poetry, Politics, Religion, Science, Transportation, War / Weaponry, Scots and Scotland, Arabs, Geography, Russia

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Henry N. Mygatt, who had been a clerk in Seward & Willard's store for about a year and a half, met a sad death in Springfield on Thurs. He terminated his employment here on Wed. and left town with the expressed intention of going to Washington, where his father resides. It appears that he stopped in Springfield, where, Thurs. aft., about 2 o'clock, he visited a saloon, and calling for drink, told the bar tender that he wanted to take some medicine in his liquor. He said that he had been up nights until his nerves were so disturbed that he had to take something to quiet them before he slept.

/ He poured the medicine - subsequently discovered to be chloral - into the glass from a small vial, drank it with the liquor and went out. He then went to the Berkshire House, and at the bar there took another portion of the chloral with some liquor, and then called for a room, saying he wanted to go to bed. He was shown to his room, and nothing more was thought about it till someone entered the room about 5 o'clock and found him dead in the bed. He had apparently gone directly to bed and fallen at once under the deadly influence of the chloral. From letters and cards found upon Mygatt's person, a telegram of inquiry was sent to Seward & Willard, who requested the Springfield authorities to give proper attention to the remains, and immediately forwarded a dispatch to Mygatt's friends in Washington. Those who were intimate with him here, do not think that it was his purpose to take his own life, but in a nervous mood he took the chloral to obtain sleep and rest, and was a victim of an overdose. Mygatt was 34 years of age and a young man of a fine gentlemanly appearance. He was for some time clerk in the Patent Office at Washington, and for 4 years was an orderly with Admiral Alden on the Wabash, accompanying General Sherman on his European trip a few years ago; and in one way and another had seen a good deal of the world. Mr. Willard became acquainted with him South, and induced him to come to Greenfield. His father reached Springfield on Fri. and took the remains home to Washington. The report that Mygatt had a wife in Washington is incorrect. The affectionate letters referred to, which were found in his pocket, were probably from his sister.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Bars (Drinking establishments), Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Diseases, Dreams / Sleep, Drug Abuse, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Furniture, Glass / Windows, Government, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Hotels, Inventions, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Medicine / Hospitals, Obituaries, Suicide, Telegraphs / Telephones, Trains, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
East India letter

Letter from Bombay by C. Hardin about a corrupt Indian prince, the Gaekwad of Baroda [see Wikipedia. He is talking about Malhar Rao Gaikwad, who was deposed in 1875 on charges of "gross misrule"].
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, Government, Literature / Web Pages, Rich People, Royalty, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 10, 1875
Letter from New Mexico

We give below the main portions of a letter from Fred W. Eals, residing in Laguna, New Mexico, to James C. Pratt of Deerfield, Mass. Mr. Eals has lived in New Mexico for several years, and has been in the employ of government as surveyor. He is son of the late Dr. George E. Eals of Ohio, and his mother, Mrs. Lucretia Eals, now resides in Deerfield. "This territory is at present undergoing a change for the better. Hitherto the Mexicans have had their own way in such matters as might be in dispute between themselves and the "American" or English speaking people; and it is needless to say they were always cleared, no matter how unjustly or illegally they acted. Hence the territory has not been developed to the extent that neighboring territories have. It has always been said by men who have investigated the subject, that New Mexico, by reason of the geographical location, is adapted to the production of such grains as belong to the North as well as to the South, and such is the fact.

/ Nearly the whole of New Mexico is available for grazing, whether of cattle or sheep, and immense tracts, well watered, are awaiting the herds, which will prove an exceedingly profitable investment for those who come early. Last year a large number of Californians came here for the purpose of looking up sheep ranges, and I have given several of them information relative to the sections I have been over while surveying. You can decipher from the above that I think very favorably of the chances for a man desirous to succeed.

/ The Mexicans are not a difficult people to get along with, provided that you do not meddle with their religion and other prejudices. They must not be flattered or petted. The Alcaldes and prominent Dons require a show of deference. The lower classes must be ruled. It is also necessary to only wink at some of their habits, which are exceedingly repulsive. They are susceptible of becoming strongly attached to an "American" and in such cases, invariably stick like grim death. Their language is readily acquired.

/ The Indians are not, in the main, troublesome. The tribes under government contribution are confined ordinarily to the West. Pueblo Indians are quiet and orderly, and are decidedly more successful in farming than their neighbors, the Mexicans. In fact, I consider them a better class of people.

/ The mineral resources of the territory are not inferior to those of any part of the Union. The gold and silver regions in the eastern portion are generally in the hands of wealthy companies. Those in the west await the hardy and experienced prospectors, and will not be very valuable until the population is sufficient to keep the Indians quiet.

/ Stock raising and trading are sure sources of great profit. Labor is cheap, being from 25 cents per day to from 15 to 20 dollars per month and board. The price of cattle is about $8 dollars per head, although in some cases they have been bought as low as $4. Sheep, $1.50 per head, cheaper farther south. Herders (boys) can be had for $10 per month. The increase is very rapid.

/ A good ranch can be taken, or desirable location purchased of the natives for from $25 to $200. Government posts are numerous, and a ranch man or trader can always dispose of his stock or grain to good advantage. If possible, I will procure a speech by Hon. S.B. Elkins (delegate) and forward to you. Now, my dear Sir, if any of your friends think of coming West, New Mexico is the place to settle in. Please favor me with a reply. Address Laguna, via Albuquerque. Yours respectfully, Fred W. Eals".
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Business Enterprises, Children, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Latin America, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Mines and Mineral Resources, Native Americans, Racism, Religion, Rich People, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Words, Work, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 3, 1875
Native life of the Zulus

By M.L. Sherman, from the New York Observer. Zulu is a country of forests, rivers and plains near Cape Natal, swept by the breezes of the Indian Ocean. The natives are superior in physique, character and intelligence, to the western coast people who have furnished Americalis with slaves, and from whom Americans derive their erroneous ideas of all the natives of Africa...Very long, interesting article.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, History, Literature / Web Pages, Racism, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 26, 1875
West Point cadetship

Prof. Seelye announces a public examination for the Annapolis cadetship of the 10th district at Walker Hall, May 19, at 10 a.m. Competitors must live in the district, be between 14 and 18 years of age, of good moral character and robust constitution, and be well versed in reading, spelling, arithmetic, geography and English grammar.
 

Subjects: Contests, Education, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Spelling, War / Weaponry, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
The approaching limit to American development

Long article discussing the expansion of the West.
 

Subjects: Economics, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
Foreign

A party of three English topographical surveyors with 210 natives and coolies were attacked by 200 Naga Indians near Calcutta Feb. 2, and 80 were killed, 90 fatally and 51 slightly wounded. The rest of the party cut off the heads of the killed to prevent the Indians from parading them in their villages. Two English regiments were sent forward at once, with orders to exterminate, root and branch, the Sanna and Ninu villages of the Naga Hill tribes.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, English (and England), Trees, War / Weaponry, Work, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
Banks of the Deerfield to Rowe

Some of the wildest, most romantic and beautiful scenery imaginable is found on the banks of Deerfield River in Rowe and Florida. In summertime the view is majestic and grand. In the northern part of Rowe there is a large rock forming the northern slope down to the river, half a mile high and nearly as wide, where, standing on the summit with a sling, I have often pitched a stone nearly, or quite into the river. The view is sublime. Standing there, it seems as if you could almost clasp hands with an other on the opposite mountain craig on the other side. There is a piece of intervale on the opposite side, with some cultivated fields and a farm house or two. The farm houses look like baby cottages, and the men and animals and pygmies viewed from the summit on the eastern side.

A great many years ago a brother of mine with a nice hound, went hunting foxes in mid-winter. The dog started a fox and drove him to the top of the precipice. The fox, thinking to escape, bounded over the smooth rock, the dog close upon his heels. But neither could travel that steep, bare rocky surface. They just went down, rolling over each other, sometimes fox and sometimes dog ahead. My brother came on just in time to see them going down. He supposed of course the dog would be killed. He went around the ledge and made his way to the foot of the precipice. There he found his faithful dog, well and sound, standing over a dead fox.

There is also a singular rock on the east bank of the Deerfield in Rowe, called Pulpit Rock. It is a huge boulder, the western face, I should think, 100 ft. high perpendicular. "Tunket", so called, is a weird dismal canon. There is a deep place in the river in Tunket called the "good hole" where, when a boy, I used to catch some splendid strings of speckled trout, weighing from 1/4 to 3 lbs. apiece. I remember very well one hot day in summer time, seeing a big trout that would not bite, basking in a cool pool where a stream came in. I took my jack knife and tied it on to my fish pole for a spear. Taking good aim, I made a pass at him and landed a trout that weighed 3 lbs. and one ounce. I will stop here with this fish story.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Children, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fishes and Fishing, Households, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Weather, Rowe (MA), Geography, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
The Holy Land at present

During this season of sacred festivals the latest information from the Holy Land, conveying, as it does, much relating to the region as a field for residence and immigration, reads very curiously. It was elicited by Sir Moses Montefiore, the wealthy London Jew [an excellent article about him at Wikipedia], who desired to benefit the people of his nation who have settled, or might wish to, round about Jerusalem.

/ Our writer states that there is some extensive, fertile and well watered land on the roadway between Jerusalem and Hebron, and he says that this could be adapted for the reception of poor families, and the water could be made available for working mills and factories. Another affirms that there is a similar fruitful territory at Rama, the birthplace of Samuel, and he adds that at Hebron there is land which is already producing corn, wine, oil, silk and cotton, mineral waters, salt and actually coal. We also learn that there are many fertile and irrigated regions in Galilee.

/ The trouble however, in the agricultural development of the Holy Land, lies in the fact that among the natives, there is not one man in a hundred knows how to plow or plant, for they are for the most part artisans. There is great need of capital, which, if it could be supplied at a rate of 5 per cent, would give very satisfactory returns. A proper system of apprenticeship for the boys of Jerusalem - who are said to be quite precocious - is also recommended, and an effort to this end is now actually being made on the Joppa farm [Joppa is now Jaffa]. The Bedouins are troublesome in some sections, but the requisite assistance can be obtained from the Turkish government. Thus we see that the Holy Land begins to be talked about and prospected very much like the newly opened regions of our own Great West.
 

Subjects: Art, Beverages, Births, Business Enterprises, Children, Coal, Economics, Education, Emigration and Immigration, English (and England), Fairs, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Jews, Liquors, Poor, Racism, Religion, Rich People, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Urbanization / Cities, Arabs, Europe

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 29, 1875
A boiling lake - in Dominica

A boiling lake - in Dominica, West Indies (short article). http://www.kellyandian.com/BoilingLake.htm .
 

Subjects: Curiosities and Wonders, Geography

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 22, 1875
News about home (Greenfield)

Rev. Mr. Moors delivered his lecture "Egypt and the pyramids" in Ware Tues. eve. He has been giving a course of lectures before the young ladies of Prospect Hill School.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Education, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Religion, Women, Arabs, Geography


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