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Mar 6, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Architecture / Construction

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 13, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
North Leverett

North Leverett - Elmer Graves has sold his farm to Alexander C. Sh[?] of Bernardston for $2000. Mr. Graves goes to Athol, where he has built a house.
 

Subjects: Athol (MA), Emigration and Immigration, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Households, Leverett (MA), Sales, Vendors and Purchasers, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - The Montague Paper Company are laying about 1200 ft. of 12 inch pipe from Fall River, emptying into the Connecticut on the side opposite their mill, to furnish the increased amount of water they will need by the recent increase of capacity. They will dam Fall River, making quite a reservoir on that side, and will retain the water in a reservoir on this side, where it will be pumped as needed.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Connecticut River, Montague (MA), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Turners Falls (MA), Work, Architecture / Construction, Water

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - Samuel Pierce has just begun a two-story two-tenement brick block on the corner of K and Seventh Streets.
 

Subjects: Montague (MA), Roads, Turners Falls (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - The Keith Mill has started up again, after being fully repaired, with full force and time.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Montague (MA), Turners Falls (MA), Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The Charles Pelton place is being repaired and enlarged.
 

Subjects: Households, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - H. Couillard is putting up some very fine stonework in front of his new block.
 

Subjects: Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - James W. Whitman is getting along very well with his new house.
 

Subjects: Households, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The new fence along the railroad seems to be well made. Stephen Chapman built the eastern portion and [?] Webster the western portion.
 

Subjects: Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Trains, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Northfield

Northfield - Frederick Z. Allen has altered and much improved his place of late.
 

Subjects: Northfield (MA), Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
South Deerfield

South Deerfield - O.S.. Arms is greatly improving his house, damaged by the fire, by putting on a new and higher roof, at an expense of about $300.
 

Subjects: Deerfield (MA), Economics, Fires, Households, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Greenfield - There was a bloody melee among Manly McClure's brickmakers on Sat. Two, Cook and Tucker, beat a comrade's face into jelly. They were arrested by policemen Jones and Carbee, and bound over to the Superior Court by Justice Davis.


 

Subjects: Courts, Crime, Criminals, Food, Greenfield (MA), Police, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 31, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Greenfield - The new road extending from Conway Street to the North meeting house has been completed and is open for travel. It has been built by Patrick Nash and is a well-built road, perfectly straight, and comes into the old road a few rods this side of the meeting house.
 

Subjects: Greenfield (MA), Religion, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Sunderland

Sunderland - Albert Hobart has built a new tobacco barn and corn house. Deacon Gay is thoroughly repairing the house he bought of the E.E. Robinson estate. Tobacco is mostly on the poles, and on the whole is an average crop. Apples are selling low, there being more than was expected. The crop of onions is good, but prices rule low.
 

Subjects: Economics, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Households, Sales, Smoking and Tobacco, Sunderland (MA), Vendors and Purchasers, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Hoosac Tunnel

Hoosac Tunnel - The enlargement of the little tunnel, to meet the requirements of the increased travel, was begun Mar. 1, and it is hoped to finish the work in two months’ more. The objects of the undertaking are to lower the grade 8 ft., to widen the roadway so as to accommodate two tracks, and to alter the direction in order to lessen the sharp curves of the road at both approaches.

The new tracks will curve slightly through the tunnel, and the curves at the entrances will be reduced. The new width at the level of the tracks will be 24 ft. B.N. Farren took the contract for the whole job and sublet the work of deepening, which requires an excavation of 10 ft., to Michael Ryan of New York. Mr. Ryan is now setting an 8 horse power steam engine and will begin running it for hoisting and for the steam drill next week.

Mica powder is used in the sides and roof, and glycerine in the bottom. The debris is taken seven or eight miles down the road and used for rip rapping. The rock is mica slate and needs no arching.

The Governor and Council are about closing another contract with B.N. Farren to continue the work on the big tunnel under the appropriations of the last Legislature. The old and new contracts amount together to about $600,000. The work is progressing at the rate of about 275 feet a month, and consists of enlarging, both in width and height, and arching with brick where the stone is soft and liable to fall.

Mr. Farren found the bore 24 ft. wide and 20 ft. high, and leaves it 30 ft. wide and 23 high. The work will probably be done in about a year from now, it being expected that the new appropriation will finish it up...

[One more long article follows, containing reports on budget items].
 

Subjects: Economics, Government, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Horses, Law and Lawyers, Recycled Products, Trains, Transportation, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The Turnverein Hall is fast approaching completion.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Germans, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - Couillard's new Hall was dedicated by the Cornet Band's ball on Fri. night.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Dance, Music, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 19, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Orange

Orange - A new building is about to be erected on East Main Street adjoining the National Bank building, and is to be occupied by Frank Water and C.I. Kellogg as a first class grocery.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Food, Orange (MA), Roads, Stores, Retail, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 16, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Greenfield - A Mr. Ryan, a gentleman connected with the contractors that are to build the railroad, has rented the Deane place, corner of Main and Hope Streets.
 

Subjects: Greenfield (MA), Roads, Trains, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Greenfield end of the Troy and Greenfield Railroad

The Greenfield end of the Troy and Greenfield Railroad - Messrs. Keith and Barton, Greenfield’s committee to adjust damages with parties on the line of the railroad, have been busy the past week, and have not yet completed their task. Starting from the track of the Connecticut River Railroad, a strip is taken from the Agricultural Fair Ground, the width of which is not yet determined.

A small portion of Mrs. Colle’s lot will probably be taken, and a little from the south side of John Osterhout’s lot and also Judge Aiken’s. A corner is taken from the Catholic premises, but the road will not come within 20 ft. of the new house, or seriously interfere with it. A small piece will be taken from the rear of Miss Lucy Billings’ lot, and the road will then cross lands belonging to the Methodist Society, H.J. Davis, A. DeWolf, L.T. Smith, Mrs. L.W. Rice, John Russell, and William Elliot, running for the most part on a side hill, and not greatly damaging any of the parties.

On E.J. Jones’ premises, it takes a part of his garden; on Dennis W. Jones, a rear lot; a strip of 50 rods, belonging to Charles L. Lowell; a strip fro the open lot adjoining, belonging to Joel Wilson, and also the premises in the rear of it belonging to ____ Merzh. Crossing the avenue, Mrs. Helen M. Pratt’s house stands directly in the way, and her whole lot is purchased. Mrs. Mary B. Coombs owns the remainder of the land to the Green River.

On the other side of Green River, the road will run 400 ft. south of James Newton’s hosue. At this point there will be a fill of 30 ft., which will require an embankment 16 rods wide at the bottom. The distance across the Newton premises is 1800 ft. It strikes the east side of J.M. Munson’s lot, not going within 25 rods of his house, taking from him 5 acres of pine land running through a cut of 33 ft. on the extreme south as it comes to the Deerfield line.

The length of the road on Munson’s land is 78 rods. The line of road is about half way between the old trotting park on Petty’s Plain and the County road west of it, crossing land belonging to the Bird heirs, a small corner of land belonging to Allen Newton, George W. Potter and Washington Jones, then lands of Caleb Jones, George W. Jones, ____ Hartwell, L.B. Wise, Elexis Jones, Charles Wood, Frederick Conant, and then on to the line at West Deerfield.

At Blakeley Hollow, the bed of the road is 23 ft. under the present track, and from that point west, runs on the side hill, a succession of cuts and fills, but nowhere interferes with houses west of Green River. The bridge across Green River is to be a two track iron bridge, 500 ft. long and 80 ft. high. The piers and abutments will have to rest on piles, as an iron rod has been sunk near the river, to the depth of 40 ft., and the ground was found to be soft and treacherous.

The bridge is to be of the first things constructed, and will be sub-contracted to one of the parties who are now making estimates.
 

Subjects: Bridges, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Horses, Households, Parks, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Trains, Trees, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Work, Architecture / Construction, Geography

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Turners Falls bridge

The Turners Falls bridge - A prayer for an injunction was filed by the Montague Paper Co. at the office of the Clerk of Courts, to prevent the County Commissioners from building the new bridge at Turners Falls, as located by the Board, which will bring the matter before the Supreme Judicial Court, which will be in session in Greenfield on the 29th. The company claims that the commissioners had no right to lay out the highway and bridge without first ascertaining that the expenses to be incurred under the act of the Legislature would not exceed $42,000...

That if the bridge is built as located, cutting off the easterly end of the company's paper mill, heavy damages will be sustained, not only by the appropriation of the company's property, but also by the interruption and permanent injury which will thereby be caused to the business; the damage, the company claims, amounting to many thousands of dollars...The company claims that its land and property cannot be lawfully taken.
 

Subjects: Bridges, Business Enterprises, Courts, Economics, Government, Law and Lawyers, Montague (MA), Roads, Trees, Turners Falls (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 13, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Greenfield - Fred Hawks left town last week to commence work upon a long bridge over the West River at Townshend Vt. It will require several weeks work with a large gang of hands to complete his contract.
 

Subjects: Bridges, Gangs, Greenfield (MA), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Vermont, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 12, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Catamount Hill Coleraine Reunion

The Catamount HIll Coleraine Reunion - The reunion of the present and former members of Catamount Hill, Coleraine occurred on Wed. Sept. 1. There was quite a large gathering of people, and the exercises which were as follows, were interesting and endorsed by those present: Reading of Scriptures by Andrus Shippee [also seen as Andros Shippee], President of the day, from Benjamin Farley’s old family Bible; Prayer by Daniel Davenport, an old resident of the hill; Hymn, Coronation Chronological History, by Dr. A.F. Davenport; Hymn, arranged for the occasion:

"This mountain, ’tis of thee
Land of sweet memory
Of thee we sing
Land where our fathers died
Land of their early pride
Aye from this mountain side
Let music ring.

Our native Mountain, thee
Land of the parent tree
Thy name we love.
We love the rocks and rills
Thy woods and towering hills
Our heart within us thrills
Like that above.

Welcome from Western lands
Thrice welcome in our hands
Ye friends of yore.
From distant home released
To mingle in glad feast
With kindred from the east
As wont before.

Let music swell the breeze
And ring from all the trees
Sweet memory’s song
Let every tongue awake
Let all that breathe partake
Let rocks their silence break
the sound prolong.

Our fathers, God, to thee
The highest praises be
To thee we song
Long may our lives be bright
Protect us by Thy might
Great God our King.

Family History, by Miss Emma Farley; Song, by Miss Gertrude Baker; Old Oaken Bucket, by David Cary; Sixty Years Ago, by Miss Nellie Ives; Dinner; After dinner there were speeches from a number of those present. The following is Dr. Davenport’s http://archiver.root...Y/2001-06/0991943526 address:

Chapter 1

And it came to pass in the reign of George and Martha, that certain tribes of the people who dwelt in many parts of the land, bethought themselves that they would leave their birth right to their brethren, and depart from the land of their fathers and go into a far off country, and make by the sweat of the brow a more noble inheritance, both to themselves and to their children.

And there was in these days a mighty wilderness, and no man kneweth the end thereof. Neither did any man dwell therein, save a few of the wandering tribes of the Gentiles called the "red man". And these did neither plant nor gather into barns; only slay a few wild beasts with the bow and arrow, for they were archers.



And now in the midst of the wilderness arose up even into the heavens an exceedingly high mountain, which was fair to look upon from the plains below, for it was covered with mighty trees even into the brow thereof. And then did roam upon this mountain many wild beasts, but the one that did most abound was one which was very fleet of foot, and did prey upon the lesser beasts of the forest, and upon the flocks of those who journeyed hither, and was called the catamount, and the region did very much abound in rocks which were the fastnesses of these beasts, and there was a cave which did reach even to the bowels of the earth in which these beasts did make their dens, and so much had they increased and multiplied that they were a terror to the coming tribes of the mountains, wherefore that place is called Catamount HIll to this day.

Chapter 2

Now the names of some of the tribes who first journeyed hither were these: Aaron, whose surname was Cary, Israel and Peter, and Amasa of the tribe of Shippee. Alden, who was also named Willis. Elihu of the tribe of Holden, and Paul, who was also called Davenport. And these said among themselves, come, let us get up and make some war upon the forests, and drive out the wild beasts, and make unto ourselves habitations.

And all the elders of the tribes said they would do so, for the thing was right in the eyes of all the people. And Aaron said unto Jemima, his wife, come, let us gather ourselves together, even from the middle of the Borough, and let us with our children travel westward, and they came and took up their abode upon the east side of the mountain.

And behold Hezekiah, whose surname was Smith, dwelt also on the east side of the mountain, even unto the entering in of the wilderness from the river. And their flocks were multiplied, for they dwelt among plants and hedges. And Peter went up and Amasa and all lsrael unto this mountain, and the tribe of Farly.

And Anan, also called Bass, went with Joseph, whose surname was Farnsworth, and they dwelt near together in the hollow according to their generations. And in those days came Paul and Alice, his wife, and they made war upon the wild beasts of the forests, and they pitched their tent and dwelt at the border thereof, where they cleared the land and had green pastures, and their flocks and herds were multiplied and they also begat children, whose names were Zacheus, Thomas and Paul, Daniel and Levi; and they also had daughters given unto them: Lydia, Sally and Alice.

And now Alice lay sick of a fever, and great fear came upon the whole household for she was nigh unto death. And Paul saddled his beast and did go for one Nathaniel, who dwelt in the valley by the river, and whose appellation was "Dr. Nat". And he came with saddlebags and he gave unto her pills of buckthorn and aloes,and the drink of herbs, queen of the meadow, motherwort and sarsaparilla, and after many days she recovered, and great rejoicing came upon all the household.

And behold Nathaniel found that she was fair to look upon, and he said, come in unto me and let us dwell together. And Alice said, I will go; and they went to dwell at the head of the meadow, in a house builded by one Artemas and Ruth. And now it came to pass after this, Joel, one of the Chiefs, and Zenas, the son of Cary, sent messengers to Nathaniel, and timbers of cedar, with masons and carpenters to build him a barn. And they builded it 40 cubits long; the stable thereof was 10 cubits, and a threshing floor 10 cubits and 20 cubits for a bay.

Chapter 3

Now it came to pass in those days, as Aaron sat in his house, that Aaron said to Jemima, his wife: "Behold, our meal getteth low, and our children hunger for bread, give unto me! I pray thee a bag that I may fill it with corn and go to the grinders". And Jemima said, go do all that is in thy heart. And Aaron arose and went. And it came to pass as he was journeying homeward from the mill, the even was come and darkness fell upon the whole land, and a great fog encompassed him about, and his way was lost. And Aaron lifted up his voice and cried aloud "Jemima! Jemima!! JEMIMA!!!"

Now Jemimah heard the cry of Aaron and answered, In here am I. But he heard her not, for her voice was weak. So she straightway took a stick and beat vehemently upon the side of the house, and Aaron hearing the sound thereof hastened homeward. Now the sons of Aaron were Zenas and Levi, but Levi died before his father and had no children. And the children of Zenas and Sally, his wife, who were of the tribe of Maxam, were these: Charlotte and Mariettie, John and George, William, David and Levi, 7 in all.

But the days of Mariettie on the earth were as a shadow, and she was not, for God took her; and Charlotte had wisdom and knowledge granted unto her, and she came in and went out before the children and taught them. And the sons of Zenas were skillful to work in stone and in timber and in tilling the land.

And behold, William was wiser than the others about bees, and the queens of Italia, and did make unto himself a great name. And David, like one of old, was a mighty man and a slayer of beasts and of cattle, and behold, the flesh thereof he did keep in markets, and with it he did feed the tribes of Aaron.

And now after many days it came to pass that Aaron and Jemima, being full of years, died. And Zenas and Sally reigned in their stead.

Chapter 4

Now Amasa, Israel and Peter were the three divisions of our tribe, who came to dwell in the hill country and they went even unto the top of the mountain and sought pastures for their flocks. Even over against the habitations of the wild beasts. And behold the house of Amasa increased greatly, and Andrus, Nancy, Jesse, Alvira and Jerusha, Henry, Chauncey, Nathan, Thankful and Kate, all these mentioned by their names, were the children of Amasa and Rhoda.

And after these days Rhoda saith unto Amasa, behold how our house has been multiplied, let us enlarge our borders, I pray thee, that there may be room in our house to dwell there. And this saying pleased Amasa and he straightway brought his cattle and his oxen, and gathered stones and timber and did build him an house, such as one as had not been there before him. He also made shingles of cedar and spruce and covered his house therewith.

Now Amasa was a man of great stature, even 5 cubits high. And Rhoda wrought fine linen and kersey, and with it did make clothes for her family and for Andrus, her first born. For behold, Rhoda was an helpmeet unto Amasa.

Now the children of Israel were Ira, Zovia, Azuba, Anan, Amasa, Catherine, Abraham, Israel, Martha and one younger called Darling. Now the children of Ira, the first born, were these: Delana, Dordana and Diana, and a son, a shepherd, who died in his youth. And Ira spake unto Dilla, his wife, to appoint their daughters to be the singers. So the daughters were appointed, and with their neighbors did often make merry with corn huskings and apple pearings [probably meant parings] with playing and dancing, making great noise with viols and with harps.

And it came to pass in these days that George took wives from the daughters of Ira, and went to dwell with Zenas, his father. And Zenas saith "Unto thee will I give the land of our fathers, even the house of Aaron, for the lot of thine inheritance" and he abode there many days. And George had exceeding much riches and honor, and he made himself treasures of silver and gold. Also storehouses for the increase of corn and stalls for all manner of beasts, and cotes for flocks, for God had given him substance very much.

And George prospered in all his works, and now sleeps with his fathers; and they buried him in the chiefest of the sepulchres of the sons of Aaron. And all the inhabitants of the hill town did him honor at his death, and Clark, his son, reigned in his stead.

And behold, Ira dwelt many years upon the mountain heights, well content with his lot. And one door of his house opened southward, and he was wont to remove his waistcoat and tarry long, even in the heat of the sun. Before his door, even near the steps thereof, the sweet-heart which Dilla had planted and watered waxed strong. And the sunflower towered high, even 6 cubits, and their fowls, their geese and their turkeys did gather in the shade thereof.

After these things it came to pass that Ira was stricken with a malady too grievous to be borne, and he died and rested with his father. And Dilla went to dwell in the house of her daughter, near the banks of the river; and in fullness of time she died. And behold, now the house of Ira was left desolate.

Chapter 5

And it came to pass in those days that Peter saw that it was not good for man to dwell alone. Now Dorcas was of the tribe of the Pikes, and Peter saw that she was fair, and he said unto her: "Dorcas, if you love me less buss [?] and they went to dwell together; and they builded them an house near the brook by the side of a rock, and nigh unto the habitations of Paul and of Levi. And lo! a mighty storm arose and it beat vehemently upon the house, but it fell not for it was founded by the rock, and darkness was upon the whole land for it was night.

And lo! while Peter and Dorcas slept, a thunderbolt descended from the heavens and did rend the house, and even the bed whereon they slept! and behold, it did divide in twain the soap trough, and did scatter the contents broadcast over the house and the children. And the dog and the swine were killed, and grat fear came upon all the household. And Peter arose and spake unto Dorcas, his wife, "Come, let us arise and give thanks unto the Lord, for he has been merciful unto us; He has saved us from the mighty judgments of the Lord".

And the next day was the Sabbath, and many people gathered in the house of the Lord, and as they went, they tarried at the house of Peter and Dorcas, and with them did offer up thankofferings [sic] that they were saved from the terrors of the thunderbolt, and He had made their lives precious in his sight. And Peter gathered with all the people in the house of the Lord, and Myres, the Elder, arose and said "The Lord hath been good unto his people; yea, He hath showed a great mercy even unto the house of Peter".

So Peter arose and sang a hymn:

"God moves in a mysterious way,
His wonders to perform
He plants his footsteps in the sea
And rides upon the storm".

And all the people said amen. And the Lord blessed Peter and his seed was multiplied: Peter, Susie, Rolly and Fanny, Annie,, Josiah, Patience, Eliza, Paul, Silas and Mila. These were his children - 11 in all.

Chapter 6

And it came to pass in those days that Daniel the prophet was joined to one of the tribe of Barnes, and her name was Patty: and Daniel was famous in his time as an expounder of the Scriptures, mighty in speech, and all the people came to hear him declare the truth on his day. And behold, he was sorely distressed, inasmuch as his substance was oftimes destroyed by fire, and desolation came upon his whole household.

And Daniel humbled himself before the God of his fathers, and the Lord favored Daniel and greatly blessed his household. And these were the sons of Daniel: David, Thomas, Alonzo, Orrie, Tirtious and Hiram; but the names of his daughters were Lucinda, Emily and Caroline. And it came to pass that these all went by themselves in families, some even to the four quarters of the earth, but David and Lucinda did abide near the house of their father.

And after these days Patty the Prophetess died, and Daniel lamented sore. But in process of time, it came to pass that Mary entered into Daniel’s house, and lo! there was restored unto him sevenfold in Mary, who was greater by far than all his former household. For since the time of the fathers there was not found the like in all the tribes of the mountain.

Chapter 7

Now it came to pass that Abraham, the son of Farnsworth, dwelt in the house of Joseph; and after many days Joseph died and Abram [sic] reigned in his stead, with Dolly, who was of the house of Holden. Now Abram was a tiller of the land, and behold, he was barefooted on the top of his head, as was also his father before him. And it came to pass that Orin was pleased with Roxy, the daughter of Abram, and he took her to wife, and they went to dwell in the house left by Nathaniel; and after many days Orin died, and Roxy tarried and reigned there.

And Riley, her brother, did dwell in the house of their father Abram. Now Dolly’s two brothers, Elihu and John, dwelt also on the south side of the mountain near the house of Anan, whose surname was Bass, and behold Anan had an impediment in his speech, and when he was old and infirm he rested from his labors; and Adna and Rebecca reigned there many years after.

Chapter 8

And it came to pass that Abram, the son of Shippee, said unto himself, Behold, I myself am a man, and I will leave even the house of my father Israel. And he married a wife from the tribe of Farley, and her name was Lucy, and they builded them an habitation and dwelt on the north side of the mountain. Now there were daughters born unto them (but behold the son shone not his face in all their household).

Fanny, Jane and Nancy, Martha, Almira and Parthena were the names of the daughters of Abraham. And it came to pass that when men did multiply on the mountains, and daughters were born unto them, that the sons saw the daughters, that they were fair, and they took them wives of all which they chose. And one, a Levite, took the firstborn of Abram; and behold all the daughters were scattered abroad. And after the death of Lucy desolation came upon the whole house. And again, after many days, Abram was joined to another and went to dwell near the plains, in an Ashfield.

Chapter 9

And it came to pass that Peter, the brother of Paul and Silas, said unto Polly, let us pitch our tent and dwell near the house of our fathers, for so it seemeth good. And now behold near by their habitation was a dense swamp, and Peter was a man of great daring, and he fain would have walked upon the surface thereof, but his faith was weak, for there was much water there.

And behold a great calamity fell upon Peter, inasmuch as his nose was divided asunder and one of his eyes were blinded by the kick of old Gilpin, and Peter was sore discouraged, and all his household; and he said unto Polly, "Come, let us journey into a far country, where peradventure we shall find greener pastures for our flocks, and a richer inheritance for our children".

And they went on their journey and Nathaniel possessed the land. And behold Nathaniel was a man of great stature and of large understandings, and he was wont to remove the coverings thereof, and to tarry long among the eels and turtles that did much abound in the meadow ditches.

Now the length of this meadow, and the breadth thereof, was exceedingly great, and in it were many islands, both great and small, covered with trees and shrubs, and with herbs; and lo, Nathaniel and Alice were wont to go out and bring in of the abundance thereof in their season; for behold Nathaniel was a disciple of Hippocrates, and was possessed of the healing art in a great degree; and he had vessels of wood and of iron in which he did compound medicines for the cure of divers maladies.

And now it came to pass when the harvest was ended, and winter drew near, Nathaniel spent the long evenings thereof making baskets of willow, and hooping the sieves which Alice did weave from hair, and did bind with the leaves of the flag. And now Robert, their firstborn, was skillful to work in brass and in iron, and to grave all manner of graving, and to find out any device that was put to him.

And lo, it came to pass that he was pierced with a chisel, and so were his days numbered. And now Nathaniel’s 4th son was called Truair, after one, a high priest, who traveled the circuit of the hill country. Now Truair did in habits much resemble his father; he was a tiller of the ground, and he bethought himself that he would journey in a far country, where he might find more fertile fields; and he bought a parcel of land where he spread his tent.

And there his possessions increased much. And it came to pass in the sixth month - the month Sivan - that he was cultivating the land, when lo, there descended upon him a thunderbolt; and he was taken up dead, and they buried him in the field of burial, in the land of strangers.

And now it came to pass that there was born unto Nathaniel a daughter, and her name was called Lydia. Now Nathaniel and Alice did set their hearts upon her, because she was their only daughter, and well favored. So Lydia dwelt in her father’s household until his death. And she did many things that were praiseworthy, for behold she was a woman zealous of good works. And after many days it came to pass that Lydia was beloved by one Emerson, of the tribe of Cary, and they dwelt henceforth with the Adamonians.

Now Ammon, Joseph, and Jason were also of the household of Nathaniel, and behold they were diligent in sowing wild oats among the rooks and the hedges, and even over the ridgepole of the houses and barns. And after they were well brushed in, it came to pass that they did leave their father’s house, and did join themselves into the society of the Odentologues. And behold they were skillful in the making of gold and silver and of ivory, and did make appliances of cunning device and workmanship, which did even eat and speak for themselves; and all the Edentulous did greatly rejoice.

So they were very diligent in repairing the crumbling incisors, bicuspids and molars, and in all that, pertained to "restoring the contour of the human face divine". And behold one went to dwell with the Gothamites, by the border of the sea; but Joseph builded him an habitation in the Norwood of the Connecticut. and lo, it came to pass, that the house of Ammon was sawn asunder, and again, after many days, it was joified and perfected; and the household of Ammon did rejoice greatly in that they did dwell in broader fields, even in the "valley view" of the winding Hoosac River.

Chapter 10

And it came to pass that Levi was a shepherd born (not made) and behold to him fell the inheritance of Paul his father, and he took up his abode there, and did build him an house of hewn logs and timber. Now the house of Levi was more comely than that of Paul, inasmuch as it was broader and higher and was divided into diverse compartments for the convenience of his family. And behold Susan was exceeding glad and said, Come now, let us build storehouses for our flocks, houses for bees, and also for our cheese.

And now Levi was a man of great cunning and he was skillful int he hiving of bees, and their swarms did greatly increase and behold their household did flow with milk and honey. Now Levi possessed lands in great abundance, and his pastures did much abound in rocks and stones, and no beast could feed thereon, save that their noses were well sharpened. So their pastures did run over with sheep and with lambs, both great and small.

And in these days it came to pass that Levi and Susan did take in abundance of the first fruits of flocks, and of cheese and of honey, and of all the increase of the fields, and the tithe of all these things brought them in abundantly, and their coffers were filled with gold and silver. And behold Levi begat great honor unto himself, inasmuch as he tarried long to possess the lands of his fathers.

Chapter 11

And it came to pass that sundry members of Amasa’s household did journey westward; and one of the daughters tarried just over the mountain, and was joined to one David whose surname was Ives. And Kate, the younger, did worship the son of Simeon the Myres, and again she was made one of the tribe of Benjamin. And behold after many days she did return to the house of her father.

Now Nathan did much resemble his father in that he was tall and of a comely countenance, and he went to dwell in the Hub, where he did dispense to the tribes thereof of the milk of human kindness.

And now Chauncey the brother of Nathan was exceeding tall, even 5 cubits and over. And it came to pass in the reign of King Winter, when he did give his snow like wood, and did scatter his ice like morsels, and his hoar frost like ashes, that one Barton did gather together all the children of the hill tribes saying: harken ye unto me, and I will dispense unto you knowledge and wisdom, and learning in great abundance.

And now much learning did make Chauncey mad, and so he did sit down heavy upon his seat, and low the teacher was sore vexed, and commanded Chauncey that he rise and sit down again. And lo, Chauncey did all that was commanded him in that he did sit down threefold heavier than before, whereupon the teacher did rend his clothes and he drew forth a raw hide and with it Chauncey was beaten with many stripes until the ire of his wrath was kindled.

And behold he leaped over the counter and seized the teacher by the throat, and held him down until he begged for his life. And behold they armed themselves with shovels and with tongs, that they might be defended against the assaults of each other, and there arose a great tumult, and all the children quaked with fear and trembling. And it came to pass that when the noise of these things went abroad, Joel, Zenas and Levi consulted together, and Mary, the daughter of Smith reigned in his stead.

And now Andros the first born of Amasa was a captain and a man of great might, in that he did brave the storms and tempests of the mountain; he was also a man of great courage and daring in that he did dwell many years nearer the lions than any of the other tribes of the mountain; even after all his father’s household had forsaken him and gone. Now Andros did search diligently among all the daughters of the hill country, but found not one who would do him honor. So he chose to dwell alone in single blessedness, and verily he shall not lose his reward.

Chapter 12

Now it came to pass in those days that Alice said unto Emily, Behold, how sin doth abound, and the love of many doth wax cold. Come, let us assemble ourselves together, there am I in their midst. So they took their hymn books and journeyed to the old school house and lighted their candle and placed it under a bushel, but on a candlestick, that it might give light unto all the house. Then after Alice had arisen from her knees they did sing an hymn. And Emily arose and said "Behold, this is the house of the Lord, let us assemble often together"; so Alice lifted up her voice and said "Amen" and they departed to their own households.

And it came to pass that the noise of these things did spread abroad throughout all the region round about. And behold all the tribes of the hill country were greatly moved and they came together by scores and by hundreds. Now Haynes, one of the elders of the people arose, and behold he was like unto Saul the son of Kish, in that he was taller by head and shoulders than the rest of the people, and he cried with a loud voice "Brethren and sisters, hearken unto me". and a great silence fell upon all the multitudes and he said "behold we are all gathered together from near and from far, let us give thanks unto the Lord, sing psalms unto his name".

Now Daniel, whose surname was Dwight, broke forth into singing:

"My chains fell off: glory! I cried
Was it for sinners Jesus died etc. etc. [sic]"

And all the people said amen and amen. And Zenas, who was greatly beloved by all the people, arose and said "Blessed be the Lord God of Israel forever and ever". And behold he did free his mind of a great burden which lay heavily upon it in that he did tell to the brethren and sisters that "he dreamed a dream; and it amounted even unto a vision". And all the people gave ear unto him, and after he had sat down behold Alice broke forth into singing:

"Oh that my load of sin were gone".

And scarcely had the voice of singing died away, when Sarah the Prophetess, the daughter of Hanshaw arose, and as she spoke a great silence fell on all the multitude for she spake of one Joel who had been suddenly taken to his death.

Now all the brethren and sisters knew and loved Joel, and they did mourn sincerely for him. And when these words sounded in their ears, their hearts were filled with sorrow; and they expressed themselves in singing mournfully. And it came to pass that Rebecca arose. Now Rebecca was a woman greatly beloved, and all the people gave ear to her as she said "It rejoiceth my heart greatly to meet with the brethren and sisters, who have come from near and from far". And when she had sat down all the people said amen.

Presently Peter arose, and his head was white and glistening, and a halo glowed around it, and his face did shine even as the light; and he blessed God with all his heart and soul; and behold, all his kinsfolk and neighbors became as lambs for quietness. But Per was greatly beloved, and when he had made an end of his sayings, he sang with a loud voice:

"On Jordan’s stormy banks I stand
And cast a wishful eye
To Canaan’s fair and happy land
Where my possessions lie".

And after this Samuel whose surname was Brown, arose and opened his mouth and said unto them "Men and brethren, it is with me as with Naaman the Syrian, when Elisha bade him go wash in Jordan; yea, more, it was as if the Jordan had been frozen over, and he had been bidden to go wash 7 times in the river. But he essayed the task, and said "Behold I have been ashamed of my brethren in the days that are past, but now do I greatly rejoice to see them zealous of good works". And Nathan, the son of Burns arose, and all the people knew that he had somewhat to say.

And Nathan said "He felt somewhat cold and lukewarm" and sat down, and all the people broke frorh into singing:

"Come Holy spirit heavenly dove
With all thy quickening powers
Kindle a flame of sacred love
In these cold hearts of ours"

And now it came to pass that Daniel the prophet arose. Now behold he was a prophet born (not made) and when the spirit seizeth him, the voice of Daniel was like the balm of Gilead, even like precious ointment upon their heads, that ran down upon the beard; even Aaron’s beard that went down to the skirts of his garments.

Now after this it came to pass that the hour was late and Myres the elder arose, and behold he was halt, and like Samson of old his locks were long and flowing. And he said "My brethren and sisters, if any man does ought to his neighbor, he must go to him and make restitution, or he can never enter into the pearly gates of the New Jerusalem". and all the people said amen and amen.

Now what shall I say more, for the time would fail me, to speak of Sister Farley and others who through faith wrought righteousness and obtained the promise. So after they had sung an hymn, they all departed and slept. And as for the rest of the doings of the tribes, are they not all written in the chronicles of our memory?
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Ashfield (MA), Barber / Hair, Beverages, Birds, Births, Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Cemeteries, Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Connecticut, Cosmetics, Dance, Diseases, Dreams / Sleep, Education, Emigration and Immigration, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
A child on the witness stand

Little Walter Ross, brother of the missing Charlie Ross, was on the stand in the Westervelt (brother of the person who abducted Charley Ross [sic] but who was shot for burglary) trial at Philadelphia on Tues. He is about 7 years old, intelligent, and told his story in his own way with very little questioning. His evidence was as follows:

"I live in Germantown, on Washington lane; on the afternoon of July 1, Charlie went out with me into the lane and we were playing; two men came along and spoke to us; they were riding; they heard us shooting fire crackers up in the yard, and they said didn’t we want to go and buy some; and Charlie said he wanted to go and buy some and then the men asked us to get in; they lifted Charlie in and then I got in; they drove up the lane and then drove up toward Limekiln pike; before we got in they said they were going to take us to get some fire crackers.

I was between the two men and Charlie was sitting on one of the men’s lap; we went down Limekiln Pike down to Church Lane; then they turned up a great high hill and then turned up another street, and then they stopped at a hotel and got Charlie and me a drink; then they stopped in a street at the corner; they gave me money and I went in the buy the firecrackers; Charlie was in the carriage; I bought the fire crackers and came out of the store and then the buggy was gone.

A man came along and asked where I lived, and I said on Washington Lane; he asked me if it was in Washington and I said no, it was in Germantown; he asked if I wanted to go to the station house and I said no; I wanted to go home, and he took me home; I met my father in the lane coming up; while we were riding in the buggy Charlie cried a little, and the men said we were going to buy fire crackers now; Charlie said before he got in he wanted torpedoes; the men said they were going to buy the fire crackers at Juliann’s.

There was a red striped cover in this buggy; they had it spread over Charlie and all of us; Charlie rode all the time on the man’s lap; I had seen these two men before the day they took us away in the wagon; I had seen them twice before that and talked with them; when I saw them before that, they were riding in a buggy; they gave us candy first; they gave us candy twice before they took us away; they were right in front of Mr. Boutelier’s place; they were on the other side of the road from me, and they said Halloo; I did not see the buggy that day; that was in the afternoon when we were going to Sunday School...

The day they give us candy I took it up to Papa and told him that the man gave us candy; there were two new houses building opposite our house last summer; there was nothing said by the men about the houses at any time; one of the men had his nose up this way (pushing the end of his own nose upward); and the other had it down; the one whose nose was up had a cut on his nose, and the other had a mustache, which was red, and his hair as red; one man had on black pants and a light jacket; the pocket went below his knees; the other had on black pants and black jacket".

[For more information see Charley Ross in Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: Barber / Hair, Beverages, Children, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Economics, Family, Fires, Food, Germans, Holidays, Hotels, Households, Kidnapping, Literature / Web Pages, Police, Religion, Roads, Robbers and Outlaws, Stores, Retail, Transportation, Vendors and Purchasers, Architecture / Construction, Clothing

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 10, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Vernon Vt.



Vernon Vt. - The town has just completed a very nice tomb, 8 ft. by 10, and 7 ft. high, inside. The front wall is of granite, 25 tons from Black Mountain, Dummerston. The work is done in a neat and substantial way by David J. Bailey of West Dummerston. The back and side walls are 2 or more ft. thick, of coarse slate laid in water cement, plastered with same on inside and lined with 4 or 5 large flag stones, also floor of the same material.

The roof consists of 2 heavy flagstones, resting in the center on 2 large bars of iron. The shelves on either side are of slate planed smooth, 2 ft. wide, 2 inches thick and 2 ft. space between them. Shelves from Granby Center, N.Y., door from New Haven, Ct. of boiler iron with space in centre [sic].

The whole, except the front wall, is neatly covered with earth. The estimated weight of stone used is 100 tons. The structure is pronounced as good as the best and reflects great credit to the builder, Tyler L. Johnson. It costs the town about $700. The building committee were W. Whithed, J.F. Burrows, and L. Brown (Vermont Record).
 

Subjects: Cemeteries, Connecticut, Economics, Government, Literature / Web Pages, Mourning Customs, Vermont, Work, Architecture / Construction, Water

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 10, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The two tenement houses being built by Newell Snow of Greenfield, on the Gillett place near the depot, are constructed by Greenfield mechanics. They could be rented today at good prices were they completed.
 

Subjects: Economics, Greenfield (MA), Households, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Architecture / Construction


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