You are not logged in.   
Username: 
Password: 

Forgot password / Verify | Sign up now! | Printer Friendly

The Franklin County Publication Archive Index is constantly updated. By creating an account you can elect to receive notices when new articles are added and when people comment on the articles.

Join today!

 

Sep 25, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Hungarians

Showing 21

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
The rage for short dresses

A song which Mme. La Mode is at present much engaged in singing is:

"If your foot is pretty, show it".

[OK I can’t resist sharing one verse of this wonderful 1857 ditty "sung by W.N. Smith, the great bone-player of Bailey’s Circus"

If your foot is pretty, show it,
No matter where, or when;
Let all fair maidens know it:
The foot takes all the men:
The face, so fair and lovely,
May charm the gazer’s eye,
But if the foot is homely,
He’ll quickly pass you by,
He’ll quickly,--He’ll quickly,
He’ll quickly pass you by.

See the rest of the lyrics at the Library of Congress’s American Memory site].

Dresses are growing shorter and shorter in front; to that extent it is almost as impossible not to know what sort of hose a lady wears. I cannot speak enthusiastically of this fashion. A woman’s charms are hightened [i.e. heightened] by their partial concealment, not their full exposure, and the poet who sang of a lady whose name I forget:

"Her feet beneath her petticoat
Like little mice stole in and out"

or words there or thereabouts, would perhaps have considered the lady’s feet regular full grown rats if he’d had a square look at them. [;-) ] And modesty - how about that? I remember at the time the short skirts, disclosing the very tops of boots, were worn in Paris. Eugenie, the lovely Empress, and Napoleon III went to pay a state visit to the sovereigns of Austria.





When Napoleon and Eugenie arrived at Vienna, they found Franz Joseph and the beautiful Empress Elizabeth awaiting them at the railway depot. Eugenia wore a delicious little short costume, in which she looked "ravissante", of course, but the Empress Elizabeth, unaffected by the latest French mode, wore the usual long dress of women. Eugenie sprang into the imperial carriage, making a display so lavish and beautiful of sky-hued hose of symmetrical proportions that such another would have secured an engagement to any ballet dancer on the spot, and then the lovely Elizabeth gathered up her skirts and placed her feet upon the carriage step.



Instantly Franz Joseph drew her drapery from her hand, and passing it closely about her, exclaimed "Take care, your Majesty, you might show your feet". Rather a smart speech, but I have often wondered whether such underhanded or underfooted slaps at guests were considered the correct thing in the Viennese code of gentility.



There’s no telling what Franz Joseph would say if he could see some of the women who prance up and down Long Branch piazzas. Might show their feet indeed! They do. And more. The first glance at these women with skirts so curiously short in front gives one an erroneous impression. Who says there’s danger of the American population fading out before the foreign cohorts’ prolific hosts, when __? Oh, no, quite the wrong tack - that’s the way they wear the dresses now. pardon, Madame! (Olive Logan’s Long Branch Letter).


 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Circus, Dance, Etiquette, Eye, Fashion, French, Government, History, Jokes, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Poetry, Royalty, Seduction, Trains, Transportation, Women, Words, Hungarians, Europe, Clothing

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
The dreadful storm in Hungary

500 lives lost in Buda-Pesth. Long article.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Disasters, Weather, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
Foreign

An extraordinary thunderstorm passed over the old Hungarian capital of Buda, opposite Pesth [i.e. Pest] on the Danube Mon. The lightning was incessant and hail fell in such quantities that the roofs of the houses and the surrounding hills were covered 2 ft. thick with ice. The waterfall was extraordinary. Torrents swept through the streets of Buda carrying men, vehicles and everything movable down the river. Many houses were suddenly flooded and destroyed before the inmates could escape. Over 500 of the inhabitants are missing, and at least 100 drowned or killed by falling walls. All the railways are interrupted. [See "The floods of Buda-Pesth in the New York Times online index for July 26, 1875].
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Floods, Households, Ice, Missing Persons, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Trains, Transportation, Urbanization / Cities, Weather, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 18, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 13, 1874
Medieval persecution of the Jews

Medieval persecution of the Jews - From the friendly shelter of the Moslem caliphates and their native East the Jews, apparently possessed by a strong taste for wandering, or an insatiable love of gain, planted their unsteady colonies in all the Western nations, and sought humbly a hospitality that was never shown. Everywhere they were received with aversion and disgust. The dark-skinned and alien race, speaking an Oriental language that no European could master, and governed by customs of neatness and propriety that seemed to Goth and Hun an excess of fastidiousness, unwarlike, and highly educated, were met everywhere by an unvarying cruelty and scorn.

In Germany they were reduced to a peculiar form of slavery. A Jew was not a person but a thing, a chattel, and a waif. The emperor took possession of the Oriental strangers as his own peculiar heritage. They were his bondsmen. He protected them when he was able, and plundered them when he wanted money. Yet they soon grew numerous and wealthy in the cities along the Rhine, and aroused the envy of their Christian neighbors by an opulence which they sometimes incautiously displayed. They were forced, or probably preferred, to live apart in a quarter of the city by themselves.

They founded their synagogues and built their schoolhouses amidst ceaseless dangers. The ignorant priests followed them with maledictions, and the still more ignorant populace pelted them with stones, and beat and pummeled them with will. Accomplished and gifted rabbins were often looked upon as magicians. The Jews’ quarters seemed to the barbarous Germans a centre of mysterious and fearful deeds. It was believed that the Jews were in the habit of stealing the Host from the altar in order to mock once more at the crucifixion with secret rites, or that they enticed away Christian children to stab them with sharp knives and sacrifice them in a frightful ceremony.

When a child strayed away in the German or Italian cities, the Christian mother at once fancied that it had been lured into the Jewish quarter to be put to death. The Jews were all supposed to be acquainted with magic, and capable of weaving dark spells that brought disease and decay, misfortune and shame, to Christian households. Yet they were wonderfully prosperous and might have outlived their early unpopularity had not a suden wave of fanaticism swept away what little humanity and intelligence had yet sprung up among the European nations.

The preaching of the Crusades turned back the course of human progress for 300 years. The passion for bloodshed and for barbarous cruelty revived under the fanatical eloquence of popes and prelates. The Roman Church taught that it was no more crime to kill a heretic or an infidel, and it had never paused to exclude the Jew from its inhuman inculcations. "Thou shalt not kill", "Thou shalt not steal", were erased from the Decalogue, and the wild and cruel throngs, dissolute and infamous, that gathered under the banners of the cross made their first essays in robbery and bloodshed among the wealthy and cultivted Jewish colonies on the banks of the Moelle and Rhine.

They burst into the Jewish quarters; they sacked the rich households, and drove their wretched inmates to suicide and death. Fair women stabbed themselves in Mentz and Treves. Husbands first killed their wives and then themselves. The Rhine floated thick with the corpses of murdered Jews. Rich with spoil and drunken with license, the Crusaders swept on, carrying devastation to all the Jewish settlements through which they passed in Hungary and Austria, and at last perished themselves in countless numbers, in unutterable numbers of thirst and hunger, disease, labor, by the darts of the Saracens, and the hatred of mankind.

Nor as the second army, under Baldwin, the chivalry of age, more merciful. When Jerusalem fell they massacred all the Jews - men, women, and children - whom they found in the city, and with tears of joy knelt before the Holy Sepulchre. Yet they might have heard, in the lull of their fanaticism, the thunders of Sinai, and their own condemnation uttered from the flaming mount (Harper’s Magazine).
 

Subjects: Beverages, Children, Crime, Criminals, Cults, Diseases, Drunkenness, Economics, Education, Etiquette, Family, Fires, Food, Germans, History, Households, Italians, Jews, Kidnapping, Missing Persons, Murder, Racism, Religion, Rich People, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 25, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 15, 1874
(Hawley) Silas Dodge & son have a fine flock of 20 high grade south down ewes from which they have raised, since March 1, 31 lambs without losing a single one.

(Hawley) Silas Dodge & son have a fine flock of 20 high grade south down ewes from which they have raised, since March 1, 31 lambs without losing a single one.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Business Enterprises, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 24, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 26, 1871
A man drowned at Turners Falls

A man drowned at Turners Falls - Two men in a skiff on Fri. found the body of a man floating in the river within a few feet of the Montague shore, just above the Turners Falls ferry. They dragged it to the shore and fastening it by a cord, sent for Coroner Samuel J. Lyons of Greenfield. He went at once and took possession of the body, which was identified as that of Henry Neitgert, a German about 40 years of age, who had been employed by the Russell Cutlery Company. He was last seen on Sat. the 17th. He came to Greenfield that day & talked with W.T. Davis about bringing his trunk here for safekeeping. The trunk was brought over and left at the house of Matthew Schieding, near the old cutlery. The man gave evidence of insanity. The same day he was seen to go over the hill at Turners Falls in the direction of the river. Other parties think they saw him out in the stream with a boat, paddling about. The body was examined by Dr. Coy of Montague City and Amos Adams, one of the Selectmen of Montague. An inquest was not thought necessary. There were no marks of violence, and in the pockets were found $47.35 in bills and scrip in a small wallet; two bank books, one from the Greenfield Savings Bank, showing a balance of $500, and the other from the Franklin Savings Institution of $369.15 in Nov. last - total amount $916.50. Two stones were also found in the pockets, and some small effects. In his trunk, which was taken possession of by the coroner, were found several papers, deeds, etc, including a policy of $3000 in the Charter Oak Life Insurance Co. There was nothing to show that the policy had been kept up. Neitgert had acted strangely for some time, and it is probable that he took his own life. He had lived with a man by the name of Miller, but had become suspicious of him and so had taken his trunk away. It is thought that he has a sister living somewhere in Connecticut, but very little is known about his history. The body was buried by the town authorities of Montague, who took possession of the effects.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Business Enterprises, Connecticut, Connecticut River, Cutlery, Economics, Family, Germans, Government, Greenfield (MA), History, Insanity, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Montague (MA), Mourning Customs, Suicide, Turners Falls (MA), Women, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 2, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 22, 1872
(Sunderland) Henry C. Clark has plowed up nearly 5 acres of tobacco, which had been nearly destroyed by worms, and sowed it to (Sunderland) http://www.townofsunderland.us/HAYRIDE.html Henry C. Clark has plowed up nearly 5 acres of tobacco, which had been nearly destroyed by worms, and sowed it to http://onlinediction...d/Hungarian%20grass/ Hungarian grass .
 

Subjects: Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Insects, Smoking and Tobacco, Sunderland (MA), Work, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Sun, Nov 30, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 8, 1870
In several of the large dress

In several of the large dress-making establishments in New York, the work is done by big, bearded men, who earn from 20 to 30 dollars a week. They are usually from the continent of Europe, where they learned the trade - women's dress-making being a common occupation for men in Austria and Hungary.
 

Subjects: Barber / Hair, Business Enterprises, Fashion, Masculinity (Machismo), Women, Work, Hungarians, Europe

Posted by stew - Fri, Nov 21, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 1, 1873
The cholera is raging at Hungary, and 50% of the cases prove fatal.

The http://www.uab.edu/reynolds/cholera.html cholera is raging at Hungary, and 50% of the cases prove fatal.
 

Subjects: Diseases, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Fri, Aug 8, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 12, 1870
Kossuth [Louis Kossuth] in his old age

http://clevelandmemory.org/Hungarians/pg037bi.htm Kossuth [Louis Kossuth] in his old age - Recently the Boston Lyceum commissioned a celebrated lecturer to travel throughout Europe until he found Kossuth, as it was reported that he was poor, and offer him a series of lucrative engagements with Lyceums in the United States...The lonely Magyar was found in Turin, and in poor circumstances. But he refused the offer, since he is content where he is, and is retired from public life.
 

Subjects: Boston (MA), Italians, Poor, Hungarians, Europe

Posted by stew - Thu, Apr 17, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, December 1, 1873
The Amherst Agricultural college

The Amherst Agricultural college - It is well known this has been a hard year for farmers everywhere, what with floods in the West and drouth in the East, the fields of the country have not produced their usual amounts. The http://www.kidsnewsr...s/afrolit/book29.htm Agricultural College farm has not, of course, escaped the misfortune that has fallen upon the farms around it, such things being beyond the control of the State, yet it makes a good exhibit of the work done and crops harvested during the past season. Several interesting experiments have been made, and though some may seem costly, yet the results are perhaps worthy of the trouble and expense. For example, we might take the experiment with corn. http://www.umass.edu...ors/stockbridge.html Prof. Stockbridge , at the beginning of the season, marked off several plots of barren land, estimated to be able to produce 15 bushels of corn with no fertilizing. To this land http://www.arps.org/...imeline/timeline.htm Prof. Stockbridge applied fertilizers of such strength and in such quantities that the products should be 25, 60, and 80 bushels per acre, if the theory proved correct. The fertilizers were some of his own composition - none of the patent swindles, and the test was simply to ascertain their actual worth. The result showed that the land yielded, unfertilized, more than was estimated, and that the highest yield was about up to what was expected, or 80 bushels per acre. But the increase was not at the rate of 10, 45 and 65 bushels over the yield of the unfertilized soil. The experiment was valuable, however, in that it showed the value of the new fertilizer and the quantity necessary to be applied to produce desired results. The experiment on potatoes, made in similar manner, showed that the theory was 5 times better than the practice, for the quantity of fertilizer applied should have increased the crops one hundred bushels, while it really turned out only 20 more. The main crops, as on every properly conducted farm, are the staples of hay, corn, oats and potatoes, no tobacco being allowed, not even by way of experiment. Doubtless the authorities deem it their duty to exterminate all noxious weeds...Most of the mowing land is old sod, yielding from ten hundred to a ton per acre...corn was all planted in rows 18 inches apart, with the German http://www.farmersjo...panycoop/feature.htm beet sower , and cultivated with horse hoes. Owing to the dry weather, the seed did not germinate well, and an acre and a half was plowed under, then sowed with sweet corn, which gave a very heavy crop, that sells readily at a high price, as it is estimated highly for its fattening properties... http://www.hyperdictionary.com/dictionary/Millet Hungarian grass was first rate, giving a http://www.essential...g/Dreid_Grasses.html yield of about 3 tons... http://www.aces.edu/...tables/rutabagas.htm Rutabagas were raised quite extensively to feed out to the cattle during the winter months, to give them a relish for the dry hay. A good many people are skeptical about the stories told of the product of rutabagas, but it is a fact that less than one acre here produced 1200 bushels, enough to furnish considerable "sauce" for the bovine diet. The rutabagas were also planted in rows 18 inches apart, which seems to be the best distance, taken altogether, allowing ease of cultivation and not crowding the tubers...The various kinds of berries are raised, as well as grapes, while peach and pear trees are being brought forward as fast as possible, and will soon be in bearing condition. Apple trees were scarce and of poor quality on the farm when the State purchased it, and the new orchards have not produced fruit as yet, but there has been a great deal of work that does not show on the surface...One large job was the filling of the gully on the slope west of the plant house, and constructing a substantial driveway in its place. A new road has also been built from the plant house, southeasterly, intersecting with the east and west road to http://www.umass.edu/cpg/master/east/fea1.htm President Clark 's house. A new fence has been built along the new highway from Amherst to North Hadley, and the Massachusetts garden, as it is to be called, has been got fairly under way. A lot of trees have been set out along the main roads of the farm, and in the course of time will transform the long reacher of glaring gravel into a magnificent avenue. The trees set out were http://www.out-there.com/fall-2.htm rock maples , http://www.nhm.ac.uk/jubileetrees/jubilee-005.htm English and http://www.auburn.ed...ulmus/americana.html American elms , and http://biology.smsu....onCampus/website.htm European lindens and http://wwwshs1.bham....ocst/wa/REGROWTH.HTM alders . Of those set out this year, only 2% have died. Those set out last year fared worse than those planted this year, showing that the vigorous pruning given the trees when transplanted was beneficial to them in a dry season. The trees were set out by the various classes, and consequently each student feels a kind of ownership in those of his class. The amount of livestock on hand, and to be kept through the winter, includes 45 head of cattle, mostly shorthorn and Ayrshire, 6 horses, 4 swine, and a large number of fowls, 50 of which are turkeys, some of them weighing 18 to 20 lbs. The stock is mostly of superior grade, the finest being the short horn bull Belvidere, 3 years old, and weighing 1800 lbs. He was bred by http://www.rootsweb.com/~mafrankl/gen/wing.htm Charles Parsons of Conway, and has taken the first and second premiums at the New England Fair, and the first one this year at the Northampton Cattle Show. The barns still remain under the charge of Mr. Dillon, who with his genial and jovial ways, is a favorite with all the students, and who has carried on the farm successfully 3 or 4 years. A word in regard to the mental discipline of this college compared with that of the "intellectual". After a 4 years' comparison of them both, we have no hesitation in declaring that in the departments of civil engineering, chemistry, and botany, the Agricultural college stands ahead of the other, and really gives a good drill (Daily Union).
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Birds, Conway (MA), Contests, Education, English (and England), Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Floods, Food, Germans, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Horses, Households, Massachusetts, New England, Roads, Smoking and Tobacco, Trees, Weather, Work, Hungarians, Europe

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 24, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, October 13, 1873
The cholera in Europe

The cholera in Europe - While portions of our own country have been scourged, first with cholera, and more recently with the yellow fever, some parts of Europe, also, have been afflicted to a considerable extent with the former epidemic, which, of late years, has annually claimed a good proportion of the summer’s death harvest. Austria, and Vienna in particular, seem to have been the center of the disease on the continent. In the latter city, since the middle of July, there have been 3030 cases, 1230 of which have proved fatal. The epidemic is now abating at Vienna, however, and spreading with increasing virulence into the neighboring country. In Hungary 104,000 deaths from the plague were reported up to Sept. 1, while the disease has gained a foothold in Bavaria, Munich having had some 700 cases during Sept., 300 proving fatal. In Paris, there were 103 deaths from cholera in the week ending Sept. 25, and 192 at Havre; while at Berlin in Germany, 89 deaths out of 151 cases occurred, the first week of Sept., and St. Petersburg lost 161 people up to Sept. 16. The province of Roumania [i.e. Romania] has suffered from the disease considerably, and portions of Italy to some extent, especially Naples, Genoa and Udine. In England the plague is reported to have appeared at Hull.
 

Subjects: Diseases, English (and England), French, Germans, Italians, Obituaries, Hungarians, Europe, Russia

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 24, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, October 13, 1873
The crops have failed in Hungary and a famine prevails in some sections of the country. The Government has determined to import Australian wheat and rye for sowing in the impoverished districts.

The crops have failed in Hungary and a famine prevails in some sections of the country. The Government has determined to import Australian wheat and rye for sowing in the impoverished districts.
 

Subjects: Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Government, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 1, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 15, 1873
A Hamburg telegraph states that a succession of failures is considered imminent among manufacturing firms in Hungary. The failure of the Volks Band at Pesth has become inevitable after fruitless nego

A Hamburg telegraph states that a succession of failures is considered imminent among manufacturing firms in Hungary. The failure of the Volks Band at Pesth has become inevitable after fruitless negotiations.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Economics, Germans, Telegraphs / Telephones, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 31, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, December 2, 1872
Hungarian fairs

Hungarian fairs - The 4 annual fairs held at http://home.att.net/~arbycards/arbtw38.htm Pesth [i.e. Pest, one half of Budapest] though they have declined of late, are of much importance, and supply half of Hungary with their commodities, sold or exchanged for honey, hides, wool, wax, and http://www.internetwines.com/rws23813.html slibowitza [i.e. slivowitz], a species of brandy prepared from plums, and fully as fiery as the Russian vodka. On these occasions the peasants flock in from every part of the kingdom, and in their varied and striking costumes make fine subjects for the artist’s pencil [Finally a genealogical scene I can relate to. My grandfather was from Buda, and Grandmother from Pest, or vice-versa. They both came from farm families. Their parents or grandparents could very well be at these fairs]. Many of them look as if they might have stepped out of the 14th or 15th century, for they have anything but a modern appearance, attired in their strange garb, frequently wearing http://www.maryrose.org/life/cloth1.htm leather jerkins and undressed skins. They are very light hearted and merry, as a rule, and dance and sing, laugh and love, tipple and quarrel after the manner of contemporaneous Irishmen. They give a foreigner a far better insight into the national character than do those in the upper ranks of life. They are ignorant, and for the most part, superstitious, but they are sturdy and independent and exceedingly patriotic, holding that God created Hungary, and that it matters very little who is responsible for the rest of the world. They delight to ride on horseback, being very skillful equestrians, and scamper over the broad plain like Bedouins of the desert. Both sexes take part in this recreation, and I have often seem a man and woman dashing frantically along on the back of one steed, who, when weary of carrying them, would kick them off, and they would roll in the dust with superabundant satisfaction. They teach their horses all manner of tricks, especially that of upsetting their rider, and this part of the equine education is grotesquely displayed at fairs. The peasants lay wagers with each other as to their ability to stick to the back of a brilliantly performing animal in spite of his efforts in the line of burlesque and low comedy. [This is great - my ancestors inventing http://www.dannick.com/tole/bronco-riding.htm bronco bucking ;-) OK, I know the rodeo came from the tradition of Spanish vaqueros, or cowboys, but it’s nice to dream!]. The contest of the man to stay on, and of the beast to put him off, is side-cracking sport for the yokels, who awake the echoes with their shouts and boisterous laughter. The horseman is so adroit and supple of limb that even when thrown he is seldom seriously hurt. He is a natural acrobat, apparently, and thumps and falls which would break the limbs or neck of any German merely increase his jollity, and afford a new opportunity for the manifestation of his agility. At the fairs one can see how primitive the habits of the common people are, how limited their wants. They prepare their food like gypsies, wrap themselves in their blankets or sheepskin coats, and sleep on the ground or under their stalls or wagons more serenely and soundly than their lords and masters do under silken canopies on beds of dantiest [i.e. daintiest] down. The earth literally serves them for a couch, and the sky for a roof; the native elements are their best friends; their rugged constitutions and hard bands, their stoutest allies and firmest supporters. Modern refinements and luxuries have in nowise effeminated them as a race; they are as intrepid and hardy as when they fought against http://whc.unesco.org/whreview/article4.html Soliman the Magnificent and fell with Tokolyi. The convocation at the fairs is diversified enough. In addition to the Hungarians there are Greeks, Servians [i.e. Serbians], Jews, http://www.sazp.sk/p.../forest/wallach.html Wallachians , Bohemians, Croats, http://www.hyperdictionary.com/dictionary/slave Sclavonians , Moldavians, and Turks. But even these may be considered part of the native population, as the origin and the composition of the http://www.bartleby.com/65/ma/Magyars.html Magyars has always been an open and unresolved question with ethnologists. They have been pronounced http://www4.stormfront.org/whitehistory/hwr31.htm Avars , Mongolians, Tartars, Finns, http://www.almanach.be/search/t/turkey.html Osmanlis , http://machaut.uchic...TER.sh?WORD=Calmucks Calmucks , and Olympus knows not what! (from Harper’s Magazine).
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Divorce, Dreams / Sleep, Education, Fairs, Fashion, Food, Gambling, Germans, Gypsies, Horses, Irish, Jews, Jokes, Liquors, Masculinity (Machismo), Music, Poor, Religion, Rich People, Royalty, Vendors and Purchasers, War / Weaponry, Stunt performers, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 31, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 1, 1872
The Abbe Liszt, acknowledged by the leading musicians of the world as the Grand Master of Instrumentation on the Piano Forte, has been so

The http://members.tripod.com/~Wolfgang5/Liszt.html Abbe Liszt , acknowledged by the leading musicians of the world as the Grand Master of Instrumentation on the Piano Forte, has been so chary of his commendation of http://digital.nypl....7909&pstrucid=244948 pianos of any particular make, that the following testimonial written by him bears additional weight...This voluntary testimony...is a triumph for America, a triumph for Boston, and an enduring triumph for Messrs. http://telleenpiano.com/html/hallet_davis.html Hallet, Davis & Co. , whose patent orchestral grand and square pianos are all made with the same fidelity as to recent improvements, purity of tone, and superiority of workmanship...[translation of a letter to http://www.hrc.utexa...fa/ziegfeld.bio.html Mr. Florence Ziegfeld [i.e. Ziegfeld], Director of the Chicago Academy of Music [and father of the creator of the Ziegfeld Follies], by F. Liszt].
 

Subjects: Advertising, Boston (MA), Music, Show Business, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 31, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 23, 1871
A brooch is worn by a Hungarian countess, composed of 4 crooked brass pins, set richly in the center of a cluster of 20 diamonds upon a lapis lazuli ground, and protected by a glass point. The count,

A brooch is worn by a Hungarian countess, composed of 4 crooked brass pins, set richly in the center of a cluster of 20 diamonds upon a lapis lazuli ground, and protected by a glass point. The count, her husband, found these pins on his coat after having been taken to his solitary cell, under condemnation for some political misdemeanor, and to prevent loss of reason he scattered the pins on the ground of the cell and then hunted for them in the rayless darkness till they were found, only to scatter them again and resume the search, thus preserving his reason from the dangerous torture of thought. In memory of this, the lady wears the best pins as her choicest jewel.
 

Subjects: Glass / Windows, Insanity, Politics, Prisons, Royalty, Women, Hungarians, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 29, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, December 19, 1870
A Boston letter to a western paper says so many cases of sudden death have occurred in Cambridge, among rich men who had just finished new and expensive houses, that a superstition has become rife on

A Boston letter to a western paper says so many cases of sudden death have occurred in Cambridge, among rich men who had just finished new and expensive houses, that a superstition has become rife on the subject. Dozens of instances are cited to prove the truth of the rule, and I know one man - he is, perhaps, the richest man in the city -who lives year after year in a shabby and incommodious house, simply because of his fear of incurring the mysterious fatality. The late Mr. Welch, the rich printer, had nearly finished a house, which would cost with its furniture $100,000, and proposed to build a stable at an expense of $20,000. Not two weeks before his death he was speaking of this very superstition and pooh-poohed it. "You may say what you please" said he, "I don’t believe it; I’ve built a fine house, and I’m alive yet." Ten days later he had left his house and all his worldly goods behind.
 

Subjects: Boston (MA), Furniture, Rich People, Hungarians, Superstition

Posted by stew - Fri, Dec 13, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 15, 1872
In Hungary, latterly, there was a famous battle over the polls, and the soldiers were called to interfere. As a result, 100 dead and 9 wounded were left on the field. The Hungarian prisons were fille

In Hungary, latterly, there was a famous battle over the polls, and the soldiers were called to interfere. As a result, 100 dead and 9 wounded were left on the field. The Hungarian prisons were filled with men who served as agitators of the crowds during the elections. In one case, the director of the post office in one large city declared to all his employees that unless they voted the Ministerial ticket, they would lose their places, and they were forbidden, under heavy penalties, to refrain from voting.
 

Subjects: Elections, Mail, Murder, Politics, Prisons, Suffrage, War / Weaponry, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Mon, Nov 4, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 12, 1873
A shocking railroad accident is reported from Hungary, in which 21 persons were killed.

A shocking railroad accident is reported from Hungary, in which 21 persons were killed.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Trains, Hungarians

Posted by stew - Tue, Jun 18, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, December 25, 1871
Great inundations are reported from the Banate, the "corn chamber" of Hungary. The rivers Great inundations are reported from the http://13.1911encyclopedia.org/B/BA/BANATE.htm Banate , the "corn chamber" of Hungary. The rivers http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/ESE/dsbanat.html Bega, Temes and Theiss are flooding thousands of acres of cultivated land. The harvest has been bad. Typhus fever is making serious havoc. In the commune of Michaly, near Temesvar, numbering a population of only 900, 3 and 4 persons die per day of fever and starvation.
 

Subjects: Connecticut, Diseases, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Floods, Food, Hungarians


Powered by manager.webworksserver.com