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Mar 6, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Vermont

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Births

Born in Brattleboro Sept. 3, a son to Charles Clement.
 

Subjects: Births, Vermont

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Births

Born in Guilford Vt. on Sept 9, a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo D. Franklin; Sept. 11, a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Frank F. Thayer [possibly Frank E. Thayer].
 

Subjects: Births, Vermont

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Births

Born in Whitingham, Vt. on Sept. 12, a daughter to H.O. Gillette and Sophronia Gillette, and grand-daughter to John Reed Esq. of North Heath.
 

Subjects: Births, Family, Vermont, Heath (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Births

Born in Wilmington Vt. on Sept. 11, a son to H.W. Barber and L.A. Barber.
 

Subjects: Births, Vermont

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 13, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Obituaries

Died in Guilford, Vt. on Sept. 11, Mabel Willette Beatrice White, infant daughter of Henry T. White and Corinna E. White.
 

Subjects: Names, Obituaries, Vermont

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 13, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Obituaries

Died, in Vernon, Vt. Aug. 12, John Stebbins Esq., aged 81. He was the son of Eliakim and Rebekah Hawks Stebbins, and the grandson of Col. John Hawks, formerly of Deerfield, Mass., who was known to history as the "hero of Fort Massachusetts" [located in North Adams], from the fact of his having [?] two soldiers in the Indian Wars of 1746, and successfully defended it for 48 hours, against a combined force of 800 French and Indians, who surrounded and sought to take it. Mr. Stebbins represented his native town in the Legislature 4 years, and held the office of Justice of the Peace and other positions for a great many years.
 

Subjects: Deerfield (MA), Emigration and Immigration, Family, French, Government, History, Massachusetts, Native Americans, Obituaries, Vermont, War / Weaponry, Berkshire County (MA)

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Whitingham, Vt.

Whitingham, Vt. - Mrs. S., an old lady 82 years old, has worked out doing housework and haying all summer; has spread, raked, loaded and opened hay equal to most men. How is that for [?].


 

Subjects: Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Households, Old Age, Vermont, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Silver wedding

Silver wedding - Whoever originated the modern idea of celebrating wedding annniversaries deserves much credit, as all will testify who were present at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. F.G. Davis of Sadawga,Vt. Aug. 25, it being the 25th anniversary of their wedding day. The worthy couple were surprised at dinner by the arrival of friends from Brattleboro, and soon after appeared in a body, 15 other teams, bringing neighbors, relatives and friends to the number of 40 or more, who unceremoniously took possession of the old house, and after greeting and hand shaking, proceeded to enjoy themselves in the most approved style, and as man (and woman as well) is a social being, they succeeded admirably.

Late in the day Mrs. Davis was again surprised by the arrival of sisters and friends from Bennington and White Creek, New York, who had crossed the mountain that day to assist in the celebration.Meanwhile sundry boxes and baskets appeared from their hiding places and their contents loaded the dining tables with the many good things which our mountain ladies know so well how to produce.

The tables were also beautifully decorted with flowers and two elegant vases, the gift of one of the guests, added much to their tasteful appearance. After refreshments Rev. N.E. Jenkins, in a few timely remarks, addressed the bride and groom, and in behalf of the donors presented a few articles of silver - a caster, cake basket, napkin rings, spoons and forks and some pieces of statuary.

Mr. Davis responded briefly, but to the point, referring to the same day 25 years ago. Though a shade of sadness marked the occasion, on account of the recent death of the aged father of the groom, the day was one long to be remembered by those present. Four generations of the family were present - the mother of the groom, his children, and one grandchild.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Children, Cutlery, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Furniture, Horses, Households, Marriage and Elopement, Obituaries, Old Age, Parties, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Statues, Transportation, Vermont, Women, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - Drs. E.C. Coy and E.R. Campbell, late of Saxon River, Vt. have gone into partnership, and will at once open a drug store in Schuler’s Block in the store lately occupied by A.W. Stevens.

[Read more about Dr.Campbell in the "History of the town of Rockingham, Vermont, including the villages of Bellows Falls, Saxtons River, Rockingham, Cambridgeport and Bartonsville, 1753-1907, with family genealogies" on Internet Archive]
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Drugstores / Drugs, Emigration and Immigration, Family, History, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Montague (MA), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Stores, Retail, Turners Falls (MA), Vermont

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - Miss Fannie E. Townsley is holding a series of religious meetings in Wallingford, Vt.

http://ethicsdaily.com/news.php?viewStory=7791
 

Subjects: Religion, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Vermont, Words, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 31, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Greenfield - J.C. Chase of Whitingham, Vt., who stopped Wed. night at the Mansion House, found, on reaching Coleraine the next day, that his pocket book containing $50 was missing.


 

Subjects: Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Crime, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Hotels, Robbers and Outlaws, Vermont

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

During a thunderstorm at Barton, Vt. the other night, a bolt fell into Alden F. Stockwell's pasture, killing 7 cows, 1 ox, 1 yearling and 14 sheep, worth in all about $400.


 

Subjects: Accidents, Animals / Reptiles, Economics, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Lightning, Vermont

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 23, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Died

Jilson, Lewis, age 40, formerly of Heath, died in Whitingham Vt. on Aug. 31.
 

Subjects: Emigration and Immigration, Obituaries, Vermont, Heath (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Married

Married in Brattleboro Sept. [?], Thomas Smith of Framingham to Mrs. Adelia L. Person of Montague.
 

Subjects: Marriage and Elopement, Massachusetts, Montague (MA), Vermont

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Married

Married in Charlemont on Sept. 7, Lyman Lillie of Pownal, Vt. to Nancy Littlejohn of Charlemont.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Marriage and Elopement, Vermont

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Married

Married in Grafton Vt. Aug. 31, Captain Anson Withey of Greenfield to Miss L.M. Ross of Grafton.
 

Subjects: Greenfield (MA), Marriage and Elopement, Vermont

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 21, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
A man murdered in Coleraine

A man murdered in Coleraine - He is killed and robbed by two young ruffians - It is now 8 years since Simeon Peck killed Miss Cheney at Griswoldville, and Coleraine is again the scene of a tragedy, which in all its details has never had a parallel in the criminal annals of the County. The victim of this terrible crime is Joseph R. Farnsworth [i.e. Joseph Riley Farnsworth], known among his townsmen as "Riley", a quiet, inoffensive man, who dwelt with his wife and two children on his mother’s farm, on what is known as "Catamount Hill", some 2 miles and a half from Shelburne Falls.

The circumstances of the affair are these: On Tues. last Farnsworth, who served in the late war, went to Greenfield to be examined by a surgeon, as required, before making out an application for pension. He went back to Shelburne Falls on the train, and at the office of H.M. Puffer Esq., had his pension paper made out. When this business was finished, he started for home, getting a chance to ride with Levi Davenport, a neighbor.

They rode together until they came to the fork of two roads which led to the mountain. Farnsworth took the road up the ravine on the easterly side, while Davenport went the other way to his home. It had by this time begun to grow dark, and Farnsworth pushed along alone through a wood and came to a place where the road separates, a path leading up to Jack Woodard’s on the one hand and to his mother’s place on the other.

At this point someone steps suddenly from the cover of bushes by the roadside and, without a word of warning, strikes him a blow upon the forehead with a stick which prostrates him upon the ground. The blow is followed up with others or with kicks, until the man’s head is covered with ghastly wounds. He is then robbed of the few dollars which he had in his pocket book.

Farnsworth was not long wholly unconscious. Within half an hour he must have rallied sufficient strength to get upon his feet, and staggering and frequently falling, he made his way home, some one hundred rods distant, and which he reached by half past 7. He was able to tell his mother and a neighbor present a part of what had happened, and Dr. Canedy of Shelburne Falls was immediately sent for.

He arrived in the evening, but found the man so badly wounded there was little that could be done for him. Farnsworth could not tell who struck him, and becoming unconscious, he lingered until about 10 o’clock Wed. morning, when he died.

The news of the affair had by this time spread over the town, and efforts made to ascertain who were the perpetrators of the crime. Suspicion soon rested upon two young men who live in the vicinity, and who had not been seen since the murder. These were Daniel Dwight, a son of Josiah J. Dwight, and Herbert Davenport, a son of widow Roxana Davenport, and a nephew of the murdered man.

The former is 19 years of age and the latter 18, and both had borne a hard name among the people of the town. Going to the scene of the assault, a heavy print of a shoe was found, where the desperado stood when he gave the murderous blow, and a few feet in front was found the pool of blood which flowed from the wounds of his victim, and a bloody trail was made by Farnsworth as he rested and stumbled home.

Not far from his place a hickory stub was found where the stick, about an inch in diameter, had been cut; and in another direction the stick itself was discovered, which corresponded with the stub, and which had been thrown away after the assault. The stick, which is in the possession of one of the officers, was evidently cut by a left handed person. Dwight is known to be left handed.

It seems that the two boys had been to Farnsworth’s house the afternoon that he was away, borrowed fifty cents from his wife, all the money that she had - they agreeing to pay her back before the time of the county fair, when she wanted to spend it. They also took away a cheap watch which belonged to Farnsworth.

Before going to Greenfield Farnsworth had made known his errand to the neighbors, and the boys probably thought that he was going to bring home his pension money and so made their plans to waylay and rob him. But the money Farnsworth had on his person could not have exceeded 2 or 3 dollars. There had been ill feeling between the boys and Farnsworth before. He had not got along happily with his wife, being frequently jealous, it is thought by some, without cause, and the fellows had taken her part.

They have been heard to threaten him on her account. Dwight, who was married and lived with his wife in a house on his father’s farm, took away with him two suits of clothes, but young Davenport is not known to have carried away only such clothes as he happened to have on, and left behind a little money and a bank book.

Wed. aft. upwards of 50 men were out scouring the woods of Coleraine, Whitingham and Heath, under Officers Henry A. Howard of Coleraine and Deputy Sheriff [?] S. Frost of Shelburne Falls, and the search by some of the party was kept up all night, but was fruitless. Dwight and Davenport are both familiar with the woods for miles around, having hunted and roamed over them together.

http://www.franklins...hotossmcleodpond.php

It was thought that perhaps the fugitives had gone in the direction of North Adams, and an officer was sent there Thurs. morning, while the general search was partly abandoned. Though the young ruffians may evade their pursuers for a while, it is hardly possible to make a successful escape. Their photographs and descriptions will be sent broadcast. The Selectmen have offered a reward of $500 for their recovery, and mean to bring them to justice.

As there is no coroner in the vicinity, S.D. Bardwell Esq. of Shelburne Falls, as a Justice of the Peace, summoned a jury to view the remains. The jury consists of Hezekiah Smith, C.W. Shattuck, A.A. Smith, Thomas D. Purrington, H.C. Millington and Russell J. Smith. They visited the scene of the murder Wed. aft., and will meet again today, when probably a verdict in accordance with the facts we have related will be rendered.

Farnsworth’s funeral took place Thurs. morning and was largely attended by the people of the town. Rev. Mr. Cole, the Methodist clergyman of Coleraine, conducted the services. Farnsworth leaves a boy of 9 and a girl of 7. His age was about 35, and his mother, with whom he lived, is about 75. The family, though poor and ignorant, were considered of average respectability. The mother of the Davenport boy has always opposed his keeping company with Dwight, who is generally supposed to have been the leader in the matter, but the two were together a great deal, and had become hardened and desperate.

A note received by J.B. Clark, one of the Selectmen of the town on Sat., stated that there was no trace then of the murderers, but that the watch supposed to have been stolen by one of the boys, was found, and was in his possession.

Latest - Intelligence from Shelburne Falls yesterday, states that Dwight was caught about half past 10 Sat. eve. Half a dozen men were laying in wait for him around his house, and he came home at that time and fell into their clutches. The whereabouts of Davenport is not known. Dwight was put into the lock-up at Shelburne Falls yesterday morning.

[A followup to this murder can be found on p. 371 of Google Books "Publications of the American Statistical Association", 1892 - 1893. There is also mention of the sentence on p. 5 of Google Books "Public Documents of Massachusetts", 1876].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Crime, Criminals, Economics, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Greenfield (MA), History, Households, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Lost and Found, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Missing Persons, Mourning Customs, Murder, Names, Photographs, Police, Poor, Prisons

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 19, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Halifax, Vt.

Halifax, Vt. - The schol at West Halifax, taught by Hattie E. Hall, closed on Fri. Sept. 3. Names of scholars having no marks against their names: Alta Larrabee, Nettie Whitney, Laura Worden, Alta Whitney, Ella Wilder, Rose Wilder and Willie Wilder. Whole number of scholars, 35; average attendance, 81 1/2.
 

Subjects: Education, Names, Vermont

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 16, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Mr. Beecher and Lake Pleasant



Mr. Beecher and Lake Pleasant - Your correspondent, induced by feelings of regret at Mr. Beecher’s announced visit to Lake Pleasant, called upon him during the week, at his summer home, the Twin Mountain House, and by a personal interview learned that your article of last week did him great injustice. Having a letter signed by all the clergy of this immediate vicinity, I found ready access to Mr. Beecher, though he must be often annoyed by visitors who, from their position, have more claim upon his attention than I. Further, the letter expressing, as it did, the Christian sentiment of this vicinity, found a quick response in Mr. Beecher’s heart, and a long conference revealed the following facts which are quite in antagonism to those published by you last week.



First - that Mr. Beecher was led to feel, that by a visit to Lake Pleasant, he would confer a favor upon his numerous friends in all this region - that there were many to whom it would be a lifelong pleasure to have once listened to him, so he should declare the Gospel unto them. Among the recent gatherings at Lake Pleasant, and their gala day character he knew nothing. When he learned that these gatherings in the past, had predjudiced [i.e. prejudiced] the Christian mind against a similar meeting there under similar conditions, though it should be in the interests of the Gospel, Mr. Beecher with true nobility of soul replied "In all matters where my own conscience will not be violated I defer most heartily and readily to the convictions of my ministerial brethren, and shall do in this".

Second - that as far as Mr. Beecher was concerned, there was no "stroke of business" at all to the arrangement. The inference in your article, that it was the compensation offered that had led him to accept the invitation to speak at Lake Pleasant, needs correction and emphatic denial.



In the course of the arrangements when compensation was spoken of, Mr. Beecher replied that "he had never taken a penny for outside work, save for his lectures, never a penny for charity addresses, never a penny for sermons preached during his vacation, never a penny for campaigning in support of political doctrines, as he did in 1856 when he made 3 addresses a week, sometimes of 3 hours each in the open air, during which campaign he even insisted upon paying his own expenses, that he might be above all criticism"; and then in substance added, I shall not accept anything for this service more than careful provision for my personal comfort.

Later, an excursion to the Tunnel having been proposed in connection with his stay here, he declined even this, in part because it would have the appearance of being a return for services rendered. It would seem therefore that the only parties interested in this as a worldly matter of dollars and cents are the railroads; and it is certain it was not from love to any of these, nor from a desire to fill their purses that led Mr. Beecher into this arrangement, but other motives, pure and noble, influenced him.

As to Mr. Beecher’s views concerning the sanctity of the Sabbath and the way in which it should be observed, I need say nothing, as last Sabbath in the course of a reply to certain criticisms upon his course that had appeared in the Vermont Chronicle, he announced that he should soon engage in the discussion of the Sabbath question.

I believe however, that he differs not so much from many of us in relation to Sabbath observance in our rural districts. He affirms that he is not settled about excursion trains in general, but when the possibility of his speaking in Greenfield on the 19th was referred to, his answering question was "How can you stop the trains?"

Whatever his view may be, it is certain that he is unwilling to violate the consciences of his brethren, if he can yield to them without violating his humor. Withal, I am convinced that Mr. Beecher in the matter referred to in your article last week, is deserving of no censure from the Christian public, but rather is worthy of imitation by them in the frankness in which he considered and recognized the judgment of those whom he felt to be better qualified than himself to judge, because of their better knowledge of fact involved; and also worthy of imitation in the promptness with which he acted in the matter.

The criticisms that have been so freely passed by many of us upon Mr. Beecher’s connection with the affair, have been criticisms of a misinformed man and hence Christian courtesy demands that we recall them. But while we draw the arrows let us apply as well the balm to heal. F.A. Warfield.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Business Enterprises, Charity, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Hotels, Lake Pleasant (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), New Hampshire, Politics, Religion, Trains, Vacations, Vermont, War / Weaponry, Words

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items



Greenfield - D.L. Moody, the evangelist, was in town last Tues., and won the everlasting esteem of one of our grocers by purchasing 4 pounds of coffee. By the way, they tell the following little incident which occurred the other day when Mr. Moody and his wife went to Brattleboro shopping. Not being particularly interested in the purchases she was to make, he took a walk along the street, and when passing the store where his wife was engaged, one clerk called to another to come to the door and see the famous preacher.

The knight of the yardstick waiting upon Mrs. Moody said "There goes Moody, the revivalist, would you not like to see him? There are a plenty of better looking men than he is, ain't there?" The lady relished the joke, and of course had a good laugh over it with her husband.

[See Wikipedia.]
 

Subjects: Beverages, Jokes, Northfield (MA), Religion, Roads, Sports, Stores, Retail, Vendors and Purchasers, Vermont, Women

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 13, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Greenfield - Fred Hawks left town last week to commence work upon a long bridge over the West River at Townshend Vt. It will require several weeks work with a large gang of hands to complete his contract.
 

Subjects: Bridges, Gangs, Greenfield (MA), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Vermont, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Married

Married in South Halifax, Vt. on Aug. 23, W.H. Conway of Filmont, N.Y. to Charlotte E. Austin of Coleraine.
 

Subjects: Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Marriage and Elopement, Vermont

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Born

Born in Leyden Aug. 19, a daughter to J.H. Newton and grand-daughter to A.M. Wheeler of West Halifax, Vt.
 

Subjects: Births, Vermont, Leyden (MA)

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Died

Arms, Daniel of Bellows Falls, Vt., age 52, a native of Old Deerfield, died at Mt. Mineral Springs in Shutesbury on Aug. 31.
 

Subjects: Deerfield (MA), Diseases, Emigration and Immigration, Medicine / Hospitals, Obituaries, Shutesbury (MA), Vermont, Water

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Died

Searle, Alice, age 26, daughter of William Searle and Lucy Searle of Westfield, drowned in Stratton Vt. on Aug. 27.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Obituaries, Vermont


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