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Sep 25, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Politics

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The first colored Senator Reverend H.R. Revels



The first colored Senator Reverend H.R. Revels [Hiram R. Revels] - A correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial writes from Holly Springs, Mississippi, as follows concerning ex-Senator Revels, now a Methodist minister near there: "When we entered the door of the plain white frame meeting house, it was filled with worshipers. The Pastor is held in high esteem by his flock at home.

He is both law maker and shepard [i.e. shepherd], statesman and preacher. His party has put an "Hon." [Honorable] before his name, and a college of his church has put a "D.D." [Doctor of Divinity" behind it. He cane home from Washington City as pure as he went,which cannot be said of every white Senator [or ANY Senator these days]...



Pastor Revels is a man of about 30, rather below medium height, with wide perceptive faculties, and a face remarkably bland and winning. He is a light mulatto,with eyes tinged with blue. He is comely, graceful and dignified, and in manner as polite as Chesterfield, without the least affectation.

His voice is strong and rich of accordant tones, his modulation distinct, his sentences models of compact English. You can almost see his punctuation points as he speaks, so exactly measured and as symmetrical as his diction. His gestures are mostly with the forearm, hand and finger, as if he would paint on canvas every shade of his meaning, and touch delicately every color of flower in his rhetoric.

There is no bombast, no trick of syllable or scare of sound. He just talks to you right out in an earnest, straightforward way, and you are arrested, interested, affected and helped by what he says. All this from a farm chattel - a United States Senator, a self-made man.

But he is far in advance of his race. He is a pioneer. Well might his colored substitute in the pulpit, a preacher black as ebony, referring to Pastor Revels in his public prayer, beseech blessings upon the head of "de old, leader of the army". We "heard a white amen to that. And he has an army of a congregation!"

It is much above the average in intelligence, and the order and attention excellent. The Pastor’s influence over the people is marvelous. He can sway a thousand people by a gesture or a word. He said to us that strange as certain demonstrations might seem, it was paradise in order and sweetness to what it had been in former days.


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Art, Education, Eye, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Noise, Politics, Racism, Religion, Scandals, War / Weaponry, Words, Work

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
General

A man named Barber made a vow a generation ago, that he would never cut his hair until Henry Clay was elected President. He died out in California the other day after having long lived a hermit's life, without having broken it.


 

Subjects: Barber / Hair, Obituaries, Politics, Words

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Clara Morris



Clara Morris - a terrible surgical operation - The wonderful surgical operation performed on the person of Clara Morris, the well known New York actress, in Paris, is described in a letter from a friend of that lady. "Miss Morris’ disease was curvature of the spine.Treated years ago, it could probably have been arrested, but it was a crisis in her profession, and upon success in surmounting many obstacles, her whole future seemed to depend, and she could not spare time for a medical treatment.



A sea voyage failed entirely to produce any change for the better, and a list of the highest medical authorities abroad confirmed her worst fears and condemned her to a horrible operation, the same which Charles Sumner submitted to, for the cure of the same disease. Its main feature is the burning of the flesh of the back from the neck down to the waist with red hot irons.



The operation was performed in Paris, in the presence of Mrs. Worthington, Miss Gabrielle Greeley and Sir William Belmore, the attending physician. Miss Gabrielle Greeley also writes a letter to a New Yorker in which she says "Poor Clara was obliged to sit on a low chair with her back bared, and she went through the operation with her face pale and rigid as marble. Dr. Belvin lit his furnace, and the roaring of the flames that was to heat the iron to a white heat in a few seconds was dreadful to hear, and while this was going on Professor Ball marked with a pencil the line the iron was to follow on either side of the spine.

Every touch of the pencil sent a thrill through the delicate frame of the poor victim, but the Professor had scarcely ended making the penciled marks when with a flash the iron was applied. It was dreadful. The white point seemed to sink an inch into the quivering form, and it was all over. The doctor said it was a wonderful exhibit of nerves."


 

Subjects: Diseases, Fires, French, Furniture, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Politics, Quacks and Quackery, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Show Business, Transportation, Vacations, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

Prof. Marsh was examined Mon. by the Red Cloud Investigating Commission. The cross examination was quite rigid and left the Professor in a very embarrassing position. He was unable to sustain any of the charges from his own personal knowledge.

He was pressed particularly close to ascertain whether he had any specific evidence to sustain the charge of criminal negligence on the part of Secretary Delano. He had only hearsay evidence...

[See Google Books "The Magazine of American History with notes and queries, Volume 23" for an explanation of this issue].

 

Subjects: Archaeology, Crime, Criminals, Education, Food, Government, History, Literature / Web Pages, Native Americans, Politics, Science

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

Mrs. Lincoln has gone to visit her sister, Mrs. Edwards, at Springfield, Ill., and arrangements have been made, in case of necessity, to place her in the Oak Lawn private retreat for the insane at Jacksonville.


 

Subjects: Family, Insanity, Medicine / Hospitals, Politics, Widows and Widowers, Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - C.C. Puffer and his family from Charleston, S.C. are visiting at the residence of his father, Dr. S. Puffer. He was an earnest supporter of Governor Chamberlain, and largely instrumental in his nomination and election.

http://www.clements....ides/NP/PufferM.html
 

Subjects: Amusements, Elections, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Government, Households, Politics, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 16, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Mr. Beecher and Lake Pleasant



Mr. Beecher and Lake Pleasant - Your correspondent, induced by feelings of regret at Mr. Beecher’s announced visit to Lake Pleasant, called upon him during the week, at his summer home, the Twin Mountain House, and by a personal interview learned that your article of last week did him great injustice. Having a letter signed by all the clergy of this immediate vicinity, I found ready access to Mr. Beecher, though he must be often annoyed by visitors who, from their position, have more claim upon his attention than I. Further, the letter expressing, as it did, the Christian sentiment of this vicinity, found a quick response in Mr. Beecher’s heart, and a long conference revealed the following facts which are quite in antagonism to those published by you last week.



First - that Mr. Beecher was led to feel, that by a visit to Lake Pleasant, he would confer a favor upon his numerous friends in all this region - that there were many to whom it would be a lifelong pleasure to have once listened to him, so he should declare the Gospel unto them. Among the recent gatherings at Lake Pleasant, and their gala day character he knew nothing. When he learned that these gatherings in the past, had predjudiced [i.e. prejudiced] the Christian mind against a similar meeting there under similar conditions, though it should be in the interests of the Gospel, Mr. Beecher with true nobility of soul replied "In all matters where my own conscience will not be violated I defer most heartily and readily to the convictions of my ministerial brethren, and shall do in this".

Second - that as far as Mr. Beecher was concerned, there was no "stroke of business" at all to the arrangement. The inference in your article, that it was the compensation offered that had led him to accept the invitation to speak at Lake Pleasant, needs correction and emphatic denial.



In the course of the arrangements when compensation was spoken of, Mr. Beecher replied that "he had never taken a penny for outside work, save for his lectures, never a penny for charity addresses, never a penny for sermons preached during his vacation, never a penny for campaigning in support of political doctrines, as he did in 1856 when he made 3 addresses a week, sometimes of 3 hours each in the open air, during which campaign he even insisted upon paying his own expenses, that he might be above all criticism"; and then in substance added, I shall not accept anything for this service more than careful provision for my personal comfort.

Later, an excursion to the Tunnel having been proposed in connection with his stay here, he declined even this, in part because it would have the appearance of being a return for services rendered. It would seem therefore that the only parties interested in this as a worldly matter of dollars and cents are the railroads; and it is certain it was not from love to any of these, nor from a desire to fill their purses that led Mr. Beecher into this arrangement, but other motives, pure and noble, influenced him.

As to Mr. Beecher’s views concerning the sanctity of the Sabbath and the way in which it should be observed, I need say nothing, as last Sabbath in the course of a reply to certain criticisms upon his course that had appeared in the Vermont Chronicle, he announced that he should soon engage in the discussion of the Sabbath question.

I believe however, that he differs not so much from many of us in relation to Sabbath observance in our rural districts. He affirms that he is not settled about excursion trains in general, but when the possibility of his speaking in Greenfield on the 19th was referred to, his answering question was "How can you stop the trains?"

Whatever his view may be, it is certain that he is unwilling to violate the consciences of his brethren, if he can yield to them without violating his humor. Withal, I am convinced that Mr. Beecher in the matter referred to in your article last week, is deserving of no censure from the Christian public, but rather is worthy of imitation by them in the frankness in which he considered and recognized the judgment of those whom he felt to be better qualified than himself to judge, because of their better knowledge of fact involved; and also worthy of imitation in the promptness with which he acted in the matter.

The criticisms that have been so freely passed by many of us upon Mr. Beecher’s connection with the affair, have been criticisms of a misinformed man and hence Christian courtesy demands that we recall them. But while we draw the arrows let us apply as well the balm to heal. F.A. Warfield.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Business Enterprises, Charity, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Hotels, Lake Pleasant (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), New Hampshire, Politics, Religion, Trains, Vacations, Vermont, War / Weaponry, Words

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 13, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Mississippi Riot



Long article about race, Republicans and Reconstruction. See Clinton, Mississippi in Wikipedia.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Politics, Racism, Riots

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 12, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Catamount Hill Coleraine Reunion

The Catamount HIll Coleraine Reunion - The reunion of the present and former members of Catamount Hill, Coleraine occurred on Wed. Sept. 1. There was quite a large gathering of people, and the exercises which were as follows, were interesting and endorsed by those present: Reading of Scriptures by Andrus Shippee [also seen as Andros Shippee], President of the day, from Benjamin Farley’s old family Bible; Prayer by Daniel Davenport, an old resident of the hill; Hymn, Coronation Chronological History, by Dr. A.F. Davenport; Hymn, arranged for the occasion:

"This mountain, ’tis of thee
Land of sweet memory
Of thee we sing
Land where our fathers died
Land of their early pride
Aye from this mountain side
Let music ring.

Our native Mountain, thee
Land of the parent tree
Thy name we love.
We love the rocks and rills
Thy woods and towering hills
Our heart within us thrills
Like that above.

Welcome from Western lands
Thrice welcome in our hands
Ye friends of yore.
From distant home released
To mingle in glad feast
With kindred from the east
As wont before.

Let music swell the breeze
And ring from all the trees
Sweet memory’s song
Let every tongue awake
Let all that breathe partake
Let rocks their silence break
the sound prolong.

Our fathers, God, to thee
The highest praises be
To thee we song
Long may our lives be bright
Protect us by Thy might
Great God our King.

Family History, by Miss Emma Farley; Song, by Miss Gertrude Baker; Old Oaken Bucket, by David Cary; Sixty Years Ago, by Miss Nellie Ives; Dinner; After dinner there were speeches from a number of those present. The following is Dr. Davenport’s http://archiver.root...Y/2001-06/0991943526 address:

Chapter 1

And it came to pass in the reign of George and Martha, that certain tribes of the people who dwelt in many parts of the land, bethought themselves that they would leave their birth right to their brethren, and depart from the land of their fathers and go into a far off country, and make by the sweat of the brow a more noble inheritance, both to themselves and to their children.

And there was in these days a mighty wilderness, and no man kneweth the end thereof. Neither did any man dwell therein, save a few of the wandering tribes of the Gentiles called the "red man". And these did neither plant nor gather into barns; only slay a few wild beasts with the bow and arrow, for they were archers.



And now in the midst of the wilderness arose up even into the heavens an exceedingly high mountain, which was fair to look upon from the plains below, for it was covered with mighty trees even into the brow thereof. And then did roam upon this mountain many wild beasts, but the one that did most abound was one which was very fleet of foot, and did prey upon the lesser beasts of the forest, and upon the flocks of those who journeyed hither, and was called the catamount, and the region did very much abound in rocks which were the fastnesses of these beasts, and there was a cave which did reach even to the bowels of the earth in which these beasts did make their dens, and so much had they increased and multiplied that they were a terror to the coming tribes of the mountains, wherefore that place is called Catamount HIll to this day.

Chapter 2

Now the names of some of the tribes who first journeyed hither were these: Aaron, whose surname was Cary, Israel and Peter, and Amasa of the tribe of Shippee. Alden, who was also named Willis. Elihu of the tribe of Holden, and Paul, who was also called Davenport. And these said among themselves, come, let us get up and make some war upon the forests, and drive out the wild beasts, and make unto ourselves habitations.

And all the elders of the tribes said they would do so, for the thing was right in the eyes of all the people. And Aaron said unto Jemima, his wife, come, let us gather ourselves together, even from the middle of the Borough, and let us with our children travel westward, and they came and took up their abode upon the east side of the mountain.

And behold Hezekiah, whose surname was Smith, dwelt also on the east side of the mountain, even unto the entering in of the wilderness from the river. And their flocks were multiplied, for they dwelt among plants and hedges. And Peter went up and Amasa and all lsrael unto this mountain, and the tribe of Farly.

And Anan, also called Bass, went with Joseph, whose surname was Farnsworth, and they dwelt near together in the hollow according to their generations. And in those days came Paul and Alice, his wife, and they made war upon the wild beasts of the forests, and they pitched their tent and dwelt at the border thereof, where they cleared the land and had green pastures, and their flocks and herds were multiplied and they also begat children, whose names were Zacheus, Thomas and Paul, Daniel and Levi; and they also had daughters given unto them: Lydia, Sally and Alice.

And now Alice lay sick of a fever, and great fear came upon the whole household for she was nigh unto death. And Paul saddled his beast and did go for one Nathaniel, who dwelt in the valley by the river, and whose appellation was "Dr. Nat". And he came with saddlebags and he gave unto her pills of buckthorn and aloes,and the drink of herbs, queen of the meadow, motherwort and sarsaparilla, and after many days she recovered, and great rejoicing came upon all the household.

And behold Nathaniel found that she was fair to look upon, and he said, come in unto me and let us dwell together. And Alice said, I will go; and they went to dwell at the head of the meadow, in a house builded by one Artemas and Ruth. And now it came to pass after this, Joel, one of the Chiefs, and Zenas, the son of Cary, sent messengers to Nathaniel, and timbers of cedar, with masons and carpenters to build him a barn. And they builded it 40 cubits long; the stable thereof was 10 cubits, and a threshing floor 10 cubits and 20 cubits for a bay.

Chapter 3

Now it came to pass in those days, as Aaron sat in his house, that Aaron said to Jemima, his wife: "Behold, our meal getteth low, and our children hunger for bread, give unto me! I pray thee a bag that I may fill it with corn and go to the grinders". And Jemima said, go do all that is in thy heart. And Aaron arose and went. And it came to pass as he was journeying homeward from the mill, the even was come and darkness fell upon the whole land, and a great fog encompassed him about, and his way was lost. And Aaron lifted up his voice and cried aloud "Jemima! Jemima!! JEMIMA!!!"

Now Jemimah heard the cry of Aaron and answered, In here am I. But he heard her not, for her voice was weak. So she straightway took a stick and beat vehemently upon the side of the house, and Aaron hearing the sound thereof hastened homeward. Now the sons of Aaron were Zenas and Levi, but Levi died before his father and had no children. And the children of Zenas and Sally, his wife, who were of the tribe of Maxam, were these: Charlotte and Mariettie, John and George, William, David and Levi, 7 in all.

But the days of Mariettie on the earth were as a shadow, and she was not, for God took her; and Charlotte had wisdom and knowledge granted unto her, and she came in and went out before the children and taught them. And the sons of Zenas were skillful to work in stone and in timber and in tilling the land.

And behold, William was wiser than the others about bees, and the queens of Italia, and did make unto himself a great name. And David, like one of old, was a mighty man and a slayer of beasts and of cattle, and behold, the flesh thereof he did keep in markets, and with it he did feed the tribes of Aaron.

And now after many days it came to pass that Aaron and Jemima, being full of years, died. And Zenas and Sally reigned in their stead.

Chapter 4

Now Amasa, Israel and Peter were the three divisions of our tribe, who came to dwell in the hill country and they went even unto the top of the mountain and sought pastures for their flocks. Even over against the habitations of the wild beasts. And behold the house of Amasa increased greatly, and Andrus, Nancy, Jesse, Alvira and Jerusha, Henry, Chauncey, Nathan, Thankful and Kate, all these mentioned by their names, were the children of Amasa and Rhoda.

And after these days Rhoda saith unto Amasa, behold how our house has been multiplied, let us enlarge our borders, I pray thee, that there may be room in our house to dwell there. And this saying pleased Amasa and he straightway brought his cattle and his oxen, and gathered stones and timber and did build him an house, such as one as had not been there before him. He also made shingles of cedar and spruce and covered his house therewith.

Now Amasa was a man of great stature, even 5 cubits high. And Rhoda wrought fine linen and kersey, and with it did make clothes for her family and for Andrus, her first born. For behold, Rhoda was an helpmeet unto Amasa.

Now the children of Israel were Ira, Zovia, Azuba, Anan, Amasa, Catherine, Abraham, Israel, Martha and one younger called Darling. Now the children of Ira, the first born, were these: Delana, Dordana and Diana, and a son, a shepherd, who died in his youth. And Ira spake unto Dilla, his wife, to appoint their daughters to be the singers. So the daughters were appointed, and with their neighbors did often make merry with corn huskings and apple pearings [probably meant parings] with playing and dancing, making great noise with viols and with harps.

And it came to pass in these days that George took wives from the daughters of Ira, and went to dwell with Zenas, his father. And Zenas saith "Unto thee will I give the land of our fathers, even the house of Aaron, for the lot of thine inheritance" and he abode there many days. And George had exceeding much riches and honor, and he made himself treasures of silver and gold. Also storehouses for the increase of corn and stalls for all manner of beasts, and cotes for flocks, for God had given him substance very much.

And George prospered in all his works, and now sleeps with his fathers; and they buried him in the chiefest of the sepulchres of the sons of Aaron. And all the inhabitants of the hill town did him honor at his death, and Clark, his son, reigned in his stead.

And behold, Ira dwelt many years upon the mountain heights, well content with his lot. And one door of his house opened southward, and he was wont to remove his waistcoat and tarry long, even in the heat of the sun. Before his door, even near the steps thereof, the sweet-heart which Dilla had planted and watered waxed strong. And the sunflower towered high, even 6 cubits, and their fowls, their geese and their turkeys did gather in the shade thereof.

After these things it came to pass that Ira was stricken with a malady too grievous to be borne, and he died and rested with his father. And Dilla went to dwell in the house of her daughter, near the banks of the river; and in fullness of time she died. And behold, now the house of Ira was left desolate.

Chapter 5

And it came to pass in those days that Peter saw that it was not good for man to dwell alone. Now Dorcas was of the tribe of the Pikes, and Peter saw that she was fair, and he said unto her: "Dorcas, if you love me less buss [?] and they went to dwell together; and they builded them an house near the brook by the side of a rock, and nigh unto the habitations of Paul and of Levi. And lo! a mighty storm arose and it beat vehemently upon the house, but it fell not for it was founded by the rock, and darkness was upon the whole land for it was night.

And lo! while Peter and Dorcas slept, a thunderbolt descended from the heavens and did rend the house, and even the bed whereon they slept! and behold, it did divide in twain the soap trough, and did scatter the contents broadcast over the house and the children. And the dog and the swine were killed, and grat fear came upon all the household. And Peter arose and spake unto Dorcas, his wife, "Come, let us arise and give thanks unto the Lord, for he has been merciful unto us; He has saved us from the mighty judgments of the Lord".

And the next day was the Sabbath, and many people gathered in the house of the Lord, and as they went, they tarried at the house of Peter and Dorcas, and with them did offer up thankofferings [sic] that they were saved from the terrors of the thunderbolt, and He had made their lives precious in his sight. And Peter gathered with all the people in the house of the Lord, and Myres, the Elder, arose and said "The Lord hath been good unto his people; yea, He hath showed a great mercy even unto the house of Peter".

So Peter arose and sang a hymn:

"God moves in a mysterious way,
His wonders to perform
He plants his footsteps in the sea
And rides upon the storm".

And all the people said amen. And the Lord blessed Peter and his seed was multiplied: Peter, Susie, Rolly and Fanny, Annie,, Josiah, Patience, Eliza, Paul, Silas and Mila. These were his children - 11 in all.

Chapter 6

And it came to pass in those days that Daniel the prophet was joined to one of the tribe of Barnes, and her name was Patty: and Daniel was famous in his time as an expounder of the Scriptures, mighty in speech, and all the people came to hear him declare the truth on his day. And behold, he was sorely distressed, inasmuch as his substance was oftimes destroyed by fire, and desolation came upon his whole household.

And Daniel humbled himself before the God of his fathers, and the Lord favored Daniel and greatly blessed his household. And these were the sons of Daniel: David, Thomas, Alonzo, Orrie, Tirtious and Hiram; but the names of his daughters were Lucinda, Emily and Caroline. And it came to pass that these all went by themselves in families, some even to the four quarters of the earth, but David and Lucinda did abide near the house of their father.

And after these days Patty the Prophetess died, and Daniel lamented sore. But in process of time, it came to pass that Mary entered into Daniel’s house, and lo! there was restored unto him sevenfold in Mary, who was greater by far than all his former household. For since the time of the fathers there was not found the like in all the tribes of the mountain.

Chapter 7

Now it came to pass that Abraham, the son of Farnsworth, dwelt in the house of Joseph; and after many days Joseph died and Abram [sic] reigned in his stead, with Dolly, who was of the house of Holden. Now Abram was a tiller of the land, and behold, he was barefooted on the top of his head, as was also his father before him. And it came to pass that Orin was pleased with Roxy, the daughter of Abram, and he took her to wife, and they went to dwell in the house left by Nathaniel; and after many days Orin died, and Roxy tarried and reigned there.

And Riley, her brother, did dwell in the house of their father Abram. Now Dolly’s two brothers, Elihu and John, dwelt also on the south side of the mountain near the house of Anan, whose surname was Bass, and behold Anan had an impediment in his speech, and when he was old and infirm he rested from his labors; and Adna and Rebecca reigned there many years after.

Chapter 8

And it came to pass that Abram, the son of Shippee, said unto himself, Behold, I myself am a man, and I will leave even the house of my father Israel. And he married a wife from the tribe of Farley, and her name was Lucy, and they builded them an habitation and dwelt on the north side of the mountain. Now there were daughters born unto them (but behold the son shone not his face in all their household).

Fanny, Jane and Nancy, Martha, Almira and Parthena were the names of the daughters of Abraham. And it came to pass that when men did multiply on the mountains, and daughters were born unto them, that the sons saw the daughters, that they were fair, and they took them wives of all which they chose. And one, a Levite, took the firstborn of Abram; and behold all the daughters were scattered abroad. And after the death of Lucy desolation came upon the whole house. And again, after many days, Abram was joined to another and went to dwell near the plains, in an Ashfield.

Chapter 9

And it came to pass that Peter, the brother of Paul and Silas, said unto Polly, let us pitch our tent and dwell near the house of our fathers, for so it seemeth good. And now behold near by their habitation was a dense swamp, and Peter was a man of great daring, and he fain would have walked upon the surface thereof, but his faith was weak, for there was much water there.

And behold a great calamity fell upon Peter, inasmuch as his nose was divided asunder and one of his eyes were blinded by the kick of old Gilpin, and Peter was sore discouraged, and all his household; and he said unto Polly, "Come, let us journey into a far country, where peradventure we shall find greener pastures for our flocks, and a richer inheritance for our children".

And they went on their journey and Nathaniel possessed the land. And behold Nathaniel was a man of great stature and of large understandings, and he was wont to remove the coverings thereof, and to tarry long among the eels and turtles that did much abound in the meadow ditches.

Now the length of this meadow, and the breadth thereof, was exceedingly great, and in it were many islands, both great and small, covered with trees and shrubs, and with herbs; and lo, Nathaniel and Alice were wont to go out and bring in of the abundance thereof in their season; for behold Nathaniel was a disciple of Hippocrates, and was possessed of the healing art in a great degree; and he had vessels of wood and of iron in which he did compound medicines for the cure of divers maladies.

And now it came to pass when the harvest was ended, and winter drew near, Nathaniel spent the long evenings thereof making baskets of willow, and hooping the sieves which Alice did weave from hair, and did bind with the leaves of the flag. And now Robert, their firstborn, was skillful to work in brass and in iron, and to grave all manner of graving, and to find out any device that was put to him.

And lo, it came to pass that he was pierced with a chisel, and so were his days numbered. And now Nathaniel’s 4th son was called Truair, after one, a high priest, who traveled the circuit of the hill country. Now Truair did in habits much resemble his father; he was a tiller of the ground, and he bethought himself that he would journey in a far country, where he might find more fertile fields; and he bought a parcel of land where he spread his tent.

And there his possessions increased much. And it came to pass in the sixth month - the month Sivan - that he was cultivating the land, when lo, there descended upon him a thunderbolt; and he was taken up dead, and they buried him in the field of burial, in the land of strangers.

And now it came to pass that there was born unto Nathaniel a daughter, and her name was called Lydia. Now Nathaniel and Alice did set their hearts upon her, because she was their only daughter, and well favored. So Lydia dwelt in her father’s household until his death. And she did many things that were praiseworthy, for behold she was a woman zealous of good works. And after many days it came to pass that Lydia was beloved by one Emerson, of the tribe of Cary, and they dwelt henceforth with the Adamonians.

Now Ammon, Joseph, and Jason were also of the household of Nathaniel, and behold they were diligent in sowing wild oats among the rooks and the hedges, and even over the ridgepole of the houses and barns. And after they were well brushed in, it came to pass that they did leave their father’s house, and did join themselves into the society of the Odentologues. And behold they were skillful in the making of gold and silver and of ivory, and did make appliances of cunning device and workmanship, which did even eat and speak for themselves; and all the Edentulous did greatly rejoice.

So they were very diligent in repairing the crumbling incisors, bicuspids and molars, and in all that, pertained to "restoring the contour of the human face divine". And behold one went to dwell with the Gothamites, by the border of the sea; but Joseph builded him an habitation in the Norwood of the Connecticut. and lo, it came to pass, that the house of Ammon was sawn asunder, and again, after many days, it was joified and perfected; and the household of Ammon did rejoice greatly in that they did dwell in broader fields, even in the "valley view" of the winding Hoosac River.

Chapter 10

And it came to pass that Levi was a shepherd born (not made) and behold to him fell the inheritance of Paul his father, and he took up his abode there, and did build him an house of hewn logs and timber. Now the house of Levi was more comely than that of Paul, inasmuch as it was broader and higher and was divided into diverse compartments for the convenience of his family. And behold Susan was exceeding glad and said, Come now, let us build storehouses for our flocks, houses for bees, and also for our cheese.

And now Levi was a man of great cunning and he was skillful int he hiving of bees, and their swarms did greatly increase and behold their household did flow with milk and honey. Now Levi possessed lands in great abundance, and his pastures did much abound in rocks and stones, and no beast could feed thereon, save that their noses were well sharpened. So their pastures did run over with sheep and with lambs, both great and small.

And in these days it came to pass that Levi and Susan did take in abundance of the first fruits of flocks, and of cheese and of honey, and of all the increase of the fields, and the tithe of all these things brought them in abundantly, and their coffers were filled with gold and silver. And behold Levi begat great honor unto himself, inasmuch as he tarried long to possess the lands of his fathers.

Chapter 11

And it came to pass that sundry members of Amasa’s household did journey westward; and one of the daughters tarried just over the mountain, and was joined to one David whose surname was Ives. And Kate, the younger, did worship the son of Simeon the Myres, and again she was made one of the tribe of Benjamin. And behold after many days she did return to the house of her father.

Now Nathan did much resemble his father in that he was tall and of a comely countenance, and he went to dwell in the Hub, where he did dispense to the tribes thereof of the milk of human kindness.

And now Chauncey the brother of Nathan was exceeding tall, even 5 cubits and over. And it came to pass in the reign of King Winter, when he did give his snow like wood, and did scatter his ice like morsels, and his hoar frost like ashes, that one Barton did gather together all the children of the hill tribes saying: harken ye unto me, and I will dispense unto you knowledge and wisdom, and learning in great abundance.

And now much learning did make Chauncey mad, and so he did sit down heavy upon his seat, and low the teacher was sore vexed, and commanded Chauncey that he rise and sit down again. And lo, Chauncey did all that was commanded him in that he did sit down threefold heavier than before, whereupon the teacher did rend his clothes and he drew forth a raw hide and with it Chauncey was beaten with many stripes until the ire of his wrath was kindled.

And behold he leaped over the counter and seized the teacher by the throat, and held him down until he begged for his life. And behold they armed themselves with shovels and with tongs, that they might be defended against the assaults of each other, and there arose a great tumult, and all the children quaked with fear and trembling. And it came to pass that when the noise of these things went abroad, Joel, Zenas and Levi consulted together, and Mary, the daughter of Smith reigned in his stead.

And now Andros the first born of Amasa was a captain and a man of great might, in that he did brave the storms and tempests of the mountain; he was also a man of great courage and daring in that he did dwell many years nearer the lions than any of the other tribes of the mountain; even after all his father’s household had forsaken him and gone. Now Andros did search diligently among all the daughters of the hill country, but found not one who would do him honor. So he chose to dwell alone in single blessedness, and verily he shall not lose his reward.

Chapter 12

Now it came to pass in those days that Alice said unto Emily, Behold, how sin doth abound, and the love of many doth wax cold. Come, let us assemble ourselves together, there am I in their midst. So they took their hymn books and journeyed to the old school house and lighted their candle and placed it under a bushel, but on a candlestick, that it might give light unto all the house. Then after Alice had arisen from her knees they did sing an hymn. And Emily arose and said "Behold, this is the house of the Lord, let us assemble often together"; so Alice lifted up her voice and said "Amen" and they departed to their own households.

And it came to pass that the noise of these things did spread abroad throughout all the region round about. And behold all the tribes of the hill country were greatly moved and they came together by scores and by hundreds. Now Haynes, one of the elders of the people arose, and behold he was like unto Saul the son of Kish, in that he was taller by head and shoulders than the rest of the people, and he cried with a loud voice "Brethren and sisters, hearken unto me". and a great silence fell upon all the multitudes and he said "behold we are all gathered together from near and from far, let us give thanks unto the Lord, sing psalms unto his name".

Now Daniel, whose surname was Dwight, broke forth into singing:

"My chains fell off: glory! I cried
Was it for sinners Jesus died etc. etc. [sic]"

And all the people said amen and amen. And Zenas, who was greatly beloved by all the people, arose and said "Blessed be the Lord God of Israel forever and ever". And behold he did free his mind of a great burden which lay heavily upon it in that he did tell to the brethren and sisters that "he dreamed a dream; and it amounted even unto a vision". And all the people gave ear unto him, and after he had sat down behold Alice broke forth into singing:

"Oh that my load of sin were gone".

And scarcely had the voice of singing died away, when Sarah the Prophetess, the daughter of Hanshaw arose, and as she spoke a great silence fell on all the multitude for she spake of one Joel who had been suddenly taken to his death.

Now all the brethren and sisters knew and loved Joel, and they did mourn sincerely for him. And when these words sounded in their ears, their hearts were filled with sorrow; and they expressed themselves in singing mournfully. And it came to pass that Rebecca arose. Now Rebecca was a woman greatly beloved, and all the people gave ear to her as she said "It rejoiceth my heart greatly to meet with the brethren and sisters, who have come from near and from far". And when she had sat down all the people said amen.

Presently Peter arose, and his head was white and glistening, and a halo glowed around it, and his face did shine even as the light; and he blessed God with all his heart and soul; and behold, all his kinsfolk and neighbors became as lambs for quietness. But Per was greatly beloved, and when he had made an end of his sayings, he sang with a loud voice:

"On Jordan’s stormy banks I stand
And cast a wishful eye
To Canaan’s fair and happy land
Where my possessions lie".

And after this Samuel whose surname was Brown, arose and opened his mouth and said unto them "Men and brethren, it is with me as with Naaman the Syrian, when Elisha bade him go wash in Jordan; yea, more, it was as if the Jordan had been frozen over, and he had been bidden to go wash 7 times in the river. But he essayed the task, and said "Behold I have been ashamed of my brethren in the days that are past, but now do I greatly rejoice to see them zealous of good works". And Nathan, the son of Burns arose, and all the people knew that he had somewhat to say.

And Nathan said "He felt somewhat cold and lukewarm" and sat down, and all the people broke frorh into singing:

"Come Holy spirit heavenly dove
With all thy quickening powers
Kindle a flame of sacred love
In these cold hearts of ours"

And now it came to pass that Daniel the prophet arose. Now behold he was a prophet born (not made) and when the spirit seizeth him, the voice of Daniel was like the balm of Gilead, even like precious ointment upon their heads, that ran down upon the beard; even Aaron’s beard that went down to the skirts of his garments.

Now after this it came to pass that the hour was late and Myres the elder arose, and behold he was halt, and like Samson of old his locks were long and flowing. And he said "My brethren and sisters, if any man does ought to his neighbor, he must go to him and make restitution, or he can never enter into the pearly gates of the New Jerusalem". and all the people said amen and amen.

Now what shall I say more, for the time would fail me, to speak of Sister Farley and others who through faith wrought righteousness and obtained the promise. So after they had sung an hymn, they all departed and slept. And as for the rest of the doings of the tribes, are they not all written in the chronicles of our memory?
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Ashfield (MA), Barber / Hair, Beverages, Birds, Births, Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Cemeteries, Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Connecticut, Cosmetics, Dance, Diseases, Dreams / Sleep, Education, Emigration and Immigration, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Died

Wilson, Dr. Milo, age 68, died in Shelburne Falls on Sept. 3. He received his medical education and diploma from the Medical College in Pittsfield, then a department of Williams College, in 1838. He commenced his practice of medicine in Ashfield. He was married in 1839 to the lady who now survives him. He removed to this village in 1845, and continued here the practice of his profession.

He has always taken an active part in local politics. He was of decided opinions, seldom on the popular side, and never shunned, rather courted opposition, thereby making some warm friends; he also incurred a good deal of enmity. He served as Representative in 1853, and was a member of the Constitutional Convention in 1854. He was a strictly honest man, and more kindly in feeling and more charitable than others often give him credit for.

The last few years of his life were spent in great weakness of body, but his decease was sudden and unexpected. He leaves but one child, a son, Dr. C.M. Wilson, who has just commenced the practice of medicine, and in whose establishment the father has taken every lively interest. Dr. Wilson's funeral will occur today at 3 p.m.
 

Subjects: Ashfield (MA), Diseases, Education, History, Medical Personnel, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Politics, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Widows and Widowers, Berkshire County (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 17, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items



Wendell T. Davis Esq., just before returning home, was a guest, with a few other Americans, of Minister Washburne [Elihu Benjamin Washburne].

[See Google Books "The national cyclopaedia of American Biography, or Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: French, Greenfield (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Politics, Vacations, Europe

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Ages of the presidents

Ages of the presidents (when they died).
 

Subjects: Government, Obituaries, Politics

Posted by stew - Tue, Jan 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Bernardston



The Bernardston Annual Union picnic, a fund for which was provided a few years ago by a munificent gentleman of New York, for the benefit of all the different Sunday schools in town, was held on Wed the 11th. The weather was favorable, the gathering of old and young quite large - between 500 and 600. The festive board was spread to profusion with every delicacy that could charm the eye or gratify the appetite, a power to charm peculiar to the Bernardston ladies, whose success in this direction cannot be outdone by anyone or ones of the feminine persuasion.

A blessing was prayed by Rev. Mr. Holmes of the Universalist society, after which the festival commenced very soon. Everything seemed to pass off quietly and joyously, and to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. A procession was formed in the morning at the town hall, under the direction of Lieut. E.S. Hulbert, and marched to the Grove escorted by the Bernardston Cornet Band, making a splendid appearance in their new uniforms. They also discoursed some sweet music at intervals through the day which added much pleasure to the occasion. This Band now numbers 21 pieces.

There was no public speaking by anyone through the day - no discussion of religious tenets or politics, but all such topics were given up for the full enjoyment of the Sunday school youth in their own innocent gayeties and childish amusements. This course was wisely suggested by Mr. Hale of New York, the generous donor to these Sunday schools, and this year it has been as wisely carried out.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Bernardston (MA), Charity, Children, Economics, Food, Music, Old Age, Politics, Religion, Weather, Women

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Washington

Washington, poet and statesman - Poem by J.R. Lowell in "Atlantic".
 

Subjects: Government, Literature / Web Pages, Poetry, Politics

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 30, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

One of the Bardwell’s ferry roughs, with more Greenfield whiskey that he could carry, settled down in front of Lamb’s music store to sleep it off Sat. aft. Officer Kimball being called upon to remove him, found the man had still life enough to show considerable fight, and was obliged to put "leaders" on him before he could take him to jail.


 

Subjects: Crime, Dreams / Sleep, Drunkenness, Gangs, Greenfield (MA), Horses, Liquors, Music, Police, Politics, Prisons, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Stores, Retail, Trains, Transportation, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 21, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Death of Andrew Johnson

Death of Andrew Johnson - Very large article.
 

Subjects: Government, Obituaries, Politics

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 21, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Smash the rings!

Medium sized article about stopping political corruption.
 

Subjects: Gangs, Politics

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Charles Nally

Charles Nally, to whom belongs the honor of being the last victim of the old fugitive slave law in York State, died at Washington last week. Nally escaped from his owner in Virginia, and coming north, found employment in Troy. One day in 1860, when returning to his work, he was seized by the officers and carried before the United States Commissioner, who remanded him to the charge of his old master.

Meanwhile a large crowd of colored people had gathered, who after a long and determined struggle, succeeded in rescuing him. He was taken across the Hudson and back into the country, where he was kept until a sufficient sum had been raised to satisfy his owner. For the past few years he has lived in Washington, where he has been employed as a messenger in the Post Office department. One of his daughters is the wife of State Senator Ruby of Mississippi.

[Apparently his wife Lucy was a mulatto, and made many whites "uncomfortable" when she married George Thompson Ruby].


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Economics, Family, Government, Law and Lawyers, Mail, Obituaries, Police, Politics, Racism, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Henry Clay and the Billy Goat

(See Internet Archive's full text of "The story of Henry Clay for readers in primary grades).
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Children, Literature / Web Pages, Politics

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 14, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The Jacksonville (Ill.) Sentinel contains the following notice of a grandson of the late Col. Ansel Phelps, who is a native of Greenfield.

"Henry P. Day of this city has accepted a position on the Peoria Daily National Democrat, as assistant political and general editor. The people of Peoria will find Mr. Day a young man of good parts, unexceptionable character, industrious, a hard student and destined to make his mark in journalism, which is his darling ambition. The Peoria Democrat is to be congratulated on his accession to its staff. He is a graduate of old Illinois College, and has taken Horace Greeley, who, as an editor, has so far certainly had no equal, as a model. The Sentinel readers will be entertained with some of his efforts on the inside pages".
 

Subjects: Education, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Greenfield (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Politics, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 21, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

We were led into a little error in our item last week referring to the marriage of Ex-Gov. Paige of Vermont. The Governor, instead of being on the "shady side of life" is right in his prime, and the happy pair did not return to Rutland after spending the night here but are on a three weeks' tour.
 

Subjects: Government, Greenfield (MA), Marriage and Elopement, Old Age, Politics, Vacations, Vermont

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 21, 1875
Foreign

It is well enough to keep track of the difficulty between the English and the King of Burmah, as a very lively war is likely to grow out of it before long, the result of which will probably be one of the most important territorial acquisitions the English in India have made for a quarter of a century. The grounds of the dispute are twofold: a little doubt about boundary lines, and the charge that the Burmese government sympathized with and assisted the Chinese who recently massacred in Western China a British exploring party of 80 persons.

/ The fact that the Chinese general who was responsible for this affair was recently received with honors in Burmah [See Burma or Myanmar in Wikipedia], has rendered the English highly indignant. The English papers intimate that war is scarcely avoidable. This is very likely to be true, for the reason that the English want a war, but certainly not because the provocation is sufficient to justify it. For according to the accounts received hitherto, the Burmese government cannot fairly be held responsible for sympathizing with an atrocity committed in China by Chinese. But the English want to annex Burmah, and that will be the secret of any war that is undertaken.

/ Disraeli is willing to add a little military glory to his administration, and British merchants sigh after the Chinese overland trade which the acquisition of Burmah would open to them. Negotiations are now pending between the two governments, and the English and Burmans are collecting armies. Of course the result of a war would be a foregone conclusion. Hostilities in that region will make it lively for the missionaries.
 

Subjects: Chinese, Crime, Criminals, Economics, English (and England), Explorers, Government, Murder, Politics, Religion, Royalty, Vendors and Purchasers, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 7, 1875
No third term

President Grant "not a candidate for renomination". Letter to General Henry White, the President of the Pennsylvania Republican convention.
 

Subjects: Government, Literature / Web Pages, Politics

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 31, 1875
News about town: Greenfield items

The following list of new books has been recently added to the Greenfield Library: Scottish Song; We and Our Neighbors [by Harriet Beecher Stowe]; Mr. Smith; The Wreck of the Chancellor [by Jules Verne]; Egypt and Iceland; A Winter in Russia; Characteristics from the Writings of J.H. Newman; Theology in the English Poets; Politics for Young Americans; English portraits; Social Life in Greece; The Starling; David Crockett; Invasion of the Crimea, 34 vols.; Strength and Beauty; Outlines of the World’s History; Mistress Judith [by Christina Catherine Liddell]; Gunnar, a Tale of Norse Life; Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations; Annual Record of Science and Industry; Shakespeare Commentaries; The New Hyperion; Manual of Political Ethics; Ismailia, by S.W. Baker; Ancient Law; St. Nicholas.
 

Subjects: Disasters, Education, English (and England), Greenfield (MA), History, Law and Lawyers, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Poetry, Politics, Religion, Science, Transportation, War / Weaponry, Scots and Scotland, Arabs, Geography, Russia

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 31, 1875
President Lincoln's widow

From John Ray, formerly Private Secretary to Mr. Lincoln. Short article.
 

Subjects: Economics, Government, Insanity, Literature / Web Pages, Politics, Widows and Widowers, Women, Work


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