You are not logged in.   
Username: 
Password: 

Forgot password / Verify | Sign up now! | Printer Friendly

The Franklin County Publication Archive Index is constantly updated. By creating an account you can elect to receive notices when new articles are added and when people comment on the articles.

Join today!

 

Sep 25, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Polish

Showing 22

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 5, 1875
Physical stamina

Article discusses prison populations, and states that prisoners, and people in general, are just as able-bodied as they were in previous years, and perhaps in better shape than in the past.
 

Subjects: Polish, Sports

Posted by stew - Wed, Jan 25, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 11, 1875
Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas - A good place to be at was the Christmas Party given by Mr. and Mrs. http://archiver.root...L/2003-02/1045025095 Franklin Pease of Conway, "Poland" district, on Christmas Eve. Over 60 invitations were given out, and every invitation responded to. Ashfield and Conway were well represented, and several other towns sent delegations. A large Christmas tree was erected, and loaded with presents till it resembled a drooping willow. It seemed that that alone would be enjoyment enough for the eve., but a very pleasant and agreeable surprise awaited us. At precisely half past 7, an unusual movement towards the parlor indicated that something that was not laid down in the programme was going on. Mounting a friendly staircase next by, and peering over the heads of a dense crowd, we beheld a young gentleman attending, with a fair young lady by his side. Just at that moment the Rev. James Dingwell, who for some unexplained reason happened to be present, arose and after a few concise and appropriate remarks, pronounced the above gentleman and lady "husband and wife". Much promiscuous kissing soon followed, and after that a bountiful supper, gotten up in Mrs. Pease's very best style. Then http://archiver.root...L/2003-02/1045025020 Chelsea Cook Esq. of Conway, and Silas Blake of Ashfield, were elected to relieve the overburdened Christmas tree of its fruit. Mr. Cook was in his happiest mood, and for an hour distributed presents with a liberal hand, while he entertained the company with his witty remarks and quaint speeches. The presents were very well selected and some of them costly. The newly made bride and groom were especially favored, their presents ranging all the way from a ready made mop, to costly silver ware. Mrs. Pease received a silver cup and plate, a nice folding chair, and other things too numerous to mention, as the auction bills say. The wedding part fo the evening's entertainment was a complete surprise to most of those present, nearest neighbors not even surmising it. For further particulars of this interesting and agreeable surprise, see married column. Besides a generous fee, Mr. Dingwell received a handsome Christmas present of greenbacks for which he wishes to say "thanks" to the company, and the company wish to say the same to Mr. and Mrs. Pease - who never do things at halves - for their generous entertainment on this joyful and enjoyable occasion.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Ashfield (MA), Conway (MA), Cutlery, Economics, Food, Furniture, Holidays, Households, Jokes, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Parties, Polish, Pottery / Crockery, Religion, Rich People, Trees, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 26, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, December 28, 1874
(South Deerfield) The (South Deerfield) The http://www.epodunk.c....php?locIndex=281452 German citizens celebrated their Christmas on Fri. eve. in Hayden's Hall, which was beautifully decorated for the occasion. On the walls were suspended shields and flags, bearing the colors of the German Empire and various German states, some of which were the German empire color, black, red and gold [actually it appears to have been http://atlasgeo.span.ch/fotw/flags/de1871.html black, red, and white ]; http://www.crwflags....gs/de-pr_k.html#1871 Prussian , black and white; http://www.christusr...ter/JPN-hessian.html Hessian , white and red; http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/de-by_v.html Bavarian , blue and white. The red, white and blue, the colors of their adopted country, stood out conspicuous at all points. The Christmas tree , filled and trimmed as only the Germans know how to do it, occupied one corner of the room. Directly opposite the entrance were the words "Merry Christmas" suspended by two beautiful "angels". The doors were thrown open to the public from 9 1/2 to 10 o'clock, after which those who paid the [?] dollar were only admitted to enjoy the merry dance.
 

Subjects: Dance, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Germans, Government, Holidays, Polish, Trees, Words

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 6, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
Riots have recently occurred at several points in Poland, on account of the forcible introduction by the government of church reform and the appointment of priests by imperial authority. A number of

Riots have recently occurred at several points in Poland, on account of the forcible introduction by the government of church reform and the appointment of priests by imperial authority. A number of the newly appointed priests have been maltreated by the mobs. The local government at the points of disturbance have been reinforced by troops from Warsaw, and a number of the ringleaders in the riot have been arrested and imprisoned.
 

Subjects: Government, Police, Polish, Prisons, Religion, Riots, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 11, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 16, 1874
(Conway) The dwelling house of Willis N. Howes of Poland district in Conway, was totally destroyed by fire on Sun. The fire originated from a defective chimney and not as was first reported, by the c

(Conway) The dwelling house of Willis N. Howes of Poland district in Conway, was totally destroyed by fire on Sun. The fire originated from a defective chimney and not as was first reported, by the carelessness of the children.
 

Subjects: Children, Conway (MA), Fires, Households, Polish

Posted by stew - Tue, Jul 6, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 14, 1874
Garibaldi's dwelling is of the most simple kind. The principle room

http://www.sc.edu/li...ist/garib/garib.html Garibaldi 's dwelling is of the most simple kind. The principle room - that occupied by himself - contains only a fireplace, a bed, a few chairs, a sideboard (doubtless given to him, as it bears his initials) and in a corner, a heap of books. There are also [sic] a plaster cast of Colonel Nullo [ http://web.tiscali.i...estroyers_names.html Francesco Nullo ], who died in Poland, and a large portrait in oil of the American Geeneral Flores. Such is the richest chamber of the house. He has only 3 persons with him - first, M. Basso; next, a countryman, about 20; and lastly, an old female cook. The island produces plenty of almonds, figs, and grapes, but only a few orange and lemon trees, transplanted there by Garibaldi, and cultivated by himself. Goats abound, and there are besides a considerable number of wild cats.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Art, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Food, Furniture, Households, Italians, Literature / Web Pages, Obituaries, Old Age, Polish, Royalty, Statues, Trees, War / Weaponry, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 7, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 20, 1874
Another great fire at Chicago

Another http://www.disasterr...s/001009chicagofire/ great fire at Chicago - ...the course of the fire was mainly northward, and it ended very near where the great fire of 1871 began, overlapping a little of the district burned over then and since rebuilt. The fire originated in a paint manufactory at the corner of 12th and Clark Streets, where some workmen were mixing paint. An explosion occurred by some mishap in mixing the chemicals, and the building was enveloped in flame almost instantly. The adjoining buildings caught fire and the flames were at first blown southward by a stiff breeze, but the wind soon shifted to the southwest, and by sunset it blew a gale, sending the fire toward the central part of the city...At one point the fire dept. began blowing up buildings with gunpowder, but they were small wooden affairs and only had the effect of spreading the fire...The west side of Wabash Avenue was soon in flames, taking many a stately building in its course, which offered a haven of refuge in the winter of 1871...The post office building took fire...Gen. MacArthur, the postmaster, had the mails removed, getting out the last just before the fire reached the structure...For two hours longer the flames continued their carnival, when they yielded to the almost supernatural efforts of the firemen, who had disputed their progress inch by inch. Three firemen were killed on Van buren Street by falling walls. Many others wre badly burned, and three steamers were destroyed, the men not being able to save them on account of the swift progress of the fire. It is reported that several children were burned to death in the tenement houses. The scenes in the streets were of the most harrowing kind. Every place within a mile of the conflagration was crowded with teams of all descriptions, and loaded to their utmost capacity with household goods. Storekeepers so fortunate as to secure a team were endeavoring to save their most valuable stock. Wherever a vacant space north of the fire could be found, it was at once filled with http://www.chicagohs.org/fire/queen/pic0025.html goods of all kinds. The losses in destruction and removals of goods and furniture are probably as great as the actual loss in buildings destroyed...Considering the area burnt over, the losses to http://www.publicsafety.net/prevention.htm insurance companies are very light, although hundreds of families lost their all, and have been rendered homeless. The business portion of the city is mainly untouched. Most of the people burned out are of the kind who do not insure. The relief and aid society, fortunately, have on hand nearly $1,000,000, and their organization still exists and is in working order. Among the buildings destroyed on the east side of Wabash Avenue was the church formerly occupied by Robert Laird Collyer's congegation, and a dozen handsome blocks between Eldridge court and Harrison Street...The notable structures consumed are the http://www.logansqua...boulevardhistory.htm Michigan Avenue House, The St. James and Continental hotels, the http://www.emich.edu...hi_calendar/bibl.htm Adelphi Theater and post office building. The principle lines of the Western Union Telegraph Company, some 40 in number, running east through State Street, were all destroyed, but communication with the outside world was kept up through the lines on Canal Street, which being on the west side of the river, were out of all possible danger. The residence of http://www.leaonline...B6rwMhme?cookieSet=1 Horace White , editor of the Chicago Tribune, was destroyed, but his books and furniture were saved. The First Methodist church, two Jewish Synagogues, St. Mary's Catholic Church, Davis Sewing Machine building, the Aiken Theater, Wood's Hotel, and the Michigan Avenue House were also destroyed. It appears that it originated not in a paint shop, but in a low wooden hovel on Clark Street near 12th Street, occupied as a rag shop of some http://www.bh.org.il.../Archive/chicago.asp Polish Jews , who are suspected, not without reason, of having set the fire to get the insurance, as the same building was fired a week ago. The loss is variously estimated, the general figure being about $4,750,000 and will not be over $6,000,000...During the search among the ruins of Tuesday night's fire, the bodies of two men and a child were discovered near 461 South Clark Street, making 7 lives known to be lost.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Business Enterprises, Canals, Charity, Charlemont (MA), Children, Crime, Criminals, Disasters, Economics, Fairs, Family, Fires, Furniture, Horses, Hotels, Households, Jews, Literature / Web Pages, Mail, Polish, Poor, Racism, Religion

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 20, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 25, 1874
The Czar in England

The Czar in England - The http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/people/A0803220.html Czar of Russia , now visiting England, cannot but have some interesting reflections during his visit. 30 years ago http://www.stormfront.org/whitehistory/hwr40.htm his father paid the same courtesy, although he was then hissed in the streets of London for his treatment of Poland. Of all the monarchs then reigning in Europe, Queen Victoria alone is now alive - even the Pope was then but a Cardinal. Since that day the third empire of France has risen, flourished, and fallen. Germany, from being a mere collection of petty sovereignties has consolidated into the mightiest military power on the continent. Austria has been driven out of Italy, and deposed from the leadership of the Germanic confederation. Italy has been building itself up into a first class kingdom with the long coveted "eternal city" for its capital. The Pope of Rome has lost his temporal sovereignty outside the walls of the Vatican. Spain has become a Republic, but like France, is still subject to the hazards of changes of which no one can see the end. Russia herself has achieved one of the two great emancipations of the age, and her Emperor, after tearing up the restrictive treaty imposed upon his father by England and France, now has an enthusiastic reception by the former, as a connection by marriage with its own royal family. Surely these are marvelous changes, and they show on the whole, that the world moves. http://www.iath.virg...rnalism/01-24-74.htm Alexander is a better ruler than Nicholas ever was, in spite of the latter's august qualities, and the public sentiment of the European nations, from England to Russia, is a decided improvement on that of 30 years ago.
 

Subjects: English (and England), Family, French, Germans, Government, History, Italians, Marriage and Elopement, Polish, Politics, Religion, Roads, Royalty, Urbanization / Cities, Vacations, War / Weaponry, Women, Europe, Russia

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 12, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 6, 1874
The town of Berdicher [most probably Berdichev in Russian Poland, inhabited mostly by Jews, has sufered from one of the most destructi

The town of Berdicher [most probably http://motlc.wiesenthal.com/pages/t007/t00718.html Berdichev in Russian Poland, inhabited mostly by Jews, has sufered from one of the most destructive and remarkable series of fires. The first day 600 houses were destroyed. The next day there was another conflagration involving a loss of nearly as many more buildings. The two succeeding days the town was again visited by fires, by which whole streets were laid in ashes, and thousands of persons were made homeless. [The remarkable thing is that this http://www.berdichev.org/holocaust.html town survived fires and murders of Jews for hundreds of years. It eventually was the site of an "extermination unit" during World War II, where 28,000+ Jews lost their lives].
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, Fishes and Fishing, Households, Jews, Murder, Polish, Racism, Roads, War / Weaponry, Russia

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 12, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 19, 1874
(Conway) E.C. Cooley has recently bought a fine Jersey Bull from the Agricultural college herd. He calls him "Prince of Poland" an

(Conway) E.C. Cooley has recently bought a fine Jersey Bull from the Agricultural college herd. He calls him "Prince of http://www.gerrylebl...tomfrompolandrd.html Poland " and will keep him for service in his vicinity.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Births, Conway (MA), Education, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Polish, Royalty, Vendors and Purchasers

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 2, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 25, 1874
Count Schouvaloff announces that all the exiled Poles, except 2 or 3 known assassins, may return to their native country.

http://www.picturehi...ind/p/7791/mcms.html Count Schouvaloff announces that all the exiled Poles, except 2 or 3 known assassins, may return to their native country.
 

Subjects: Assassination, Emigration and Immigration, Polish, Royalty, Russia

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 4, 1874
(Conway) Daniel Clark of Poland, in his 67th year, has made this season 995 lbs. of sugar, and 14 gallons of molasses, with only 190 buc

(Conway) Daniel Clark of http://www.vermontbridges.com/nspcb.winter02.htm Poland , in his 67th year, has made this season 995 lbs. of sugar, and 14 gallons of molasses, with only 190 buckets.
 

Subjects: Conway (MA), Food, Polish, Work

Posted by stew - Sat, Nov 29, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 13, 1874
(Orange) Eggs for hatching at panic prices

(Orange) Eggs for hatching at panic prices - From pure-bred fowls of 16 excellent varieties, viz: Buff , http://www.dianejack...es/Cochins_White.htm white and partridge cochins , dark and http://www.cacklehatchery.com/lbrahma.html light brahmas , http://www.dianejacky.com/PC_5Plym.html plymouth rocks , http://www.dianejack...pages/Dominiques.htm dominiques , white face black Spanish , http://www.geocities...s/houdan-polish.html Houdans , http://www.mcmurrayh...ed_black_polish.html Black Polands with white crests), http://www.mcmurrayh...ed_black_polish.html Golden Polands , http://www.mcmurrayh...nciled_hamburgs.html Golden Penciled Hamburgs , http://www.mcmurrayh...angled_hamburgs.html Silver Spangled Hamburgs , http://www.the-coop....um/messages/954.html White Leghorns , http://mdkauctions.n...ed/messages/560.html Games and http://www.andalusia....au/mf/p_silkies.htm Chinese Silkies . N.B. - All stock warranted pure and of superior quality. Address J.L. Weaver, Orange, Mass.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Birds, Chinese, Economics, Food, Germans, Orange (MA), Polish, Sales, Europe

Posted by stew - Tue, Nov 18, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 6, 1874
(Turners Falls) For a year or more the village has been troubled with burglars, many of the stores having been broken open and quantities of goods stolen. These lawbreakers managed to escape detectio

(Turners Falls) For a year or more the village has been troubled with burglars, many of the stores having been broken open and quantities of goods stolen. These lawbreakers managed to escape detection until Tues., when remnants of some of the stolen goods were found in the cellar of a house which had been hurriedly vacated by a http://spartan.ac.br..._Abbott_1912_15.html Bohemian family of bad repute, the night previous. A portion of the family were traced to New Jersey, where they were arrested, to await the arrival for the Falls officers. It is believed that to this family all the burglaries can be traced.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, Family, Households, Law and Lawyers, Montague (MA), Polish, Robbers and Outlaws, Stores, Retail, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Fri, Sep 5, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 18, 1870
Conway (poem by J.G. Goosequill, North Hoosick, N.Y.) Thou art a rugged, upland town/ With no great history or renown/ In book or story/ But to thy sons, though scattered wide/ Each narrow vale and r

Conway (poem by J.G. Goosequill, North Hoosick, N.Y.) Thou art a rugged, upland town/ With no great history or renown/ In book or story/ But to thy sons, though scattered wide/ Each narrow vale and rough hillside/ Is canopied with glory/ From Hoosac's glades to Shirkshire's hills/ And http://archiver.root...L/2003-10/1067142398 Poland 's never failing rills;/ And http://boards.ancest...ounties.franklin/757 Cricket's Hill around/ From Broomshire's heights and Deerfield's shores/ Down to Hard-Scrabble's lonely moore/ Each spot is hallowed ground/
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Conway (MA), Deerfield (MA), History, Poetry, Polish

Posted by stew - Tue, Jul 22, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 2, 1874
The end of Poland (unclear article).

The end of Poland (unclear article).
 

Subjects: Polish

Posted by stew - Fri, Jun 6, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 5, 1874
The man Osler, who was convicted at the last assizes in Pembroke Canada, of outraging and murdering a Polish woman named Luevitgh [I

The man Osler, who was convicted at the last assizes in http://www.slider.co.../Pembroke_Canada.htm Pembroke Canada , of outraging and murdering a Polish woman named Luevitgh [I doubt this is spelled correctly], aged about 80 years, was hanged Sat. 27th.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Executions and Executioners, Murder, Old Age, Polish, Rape, Sex Crimes, Women, Canada

Posted by stew - Tue, May 27, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 8, 1872
A remarkable escape from Siberia (tells the story of M. Rufin Piotrowski, a Pole

A remarkable escape from Siberia (tells the story of M. Rufin Piotrowski, a http://www.memorialh...nced&transcription=0 Pole , who escaped from Siberia in 1846).
 

Subjects: Polish, Russia

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 2, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 8, 1873
(Conway) Monroe Turner's barn in Poland, together with the sheds, containing some 12 or 14 tons of hay, wagon, sleds, sap tubs, harnesses and som

(Conway) Monroe Turner's barn in http://www.seiberspace.com/raptor.html Poland , together with the sheds, containing some 12 or 14 tons of hay, wagon, sleds, sap tubs, harnesses and some farming tools, was entirely destroyed by fire between the hours of 8 and 9 p.m. Sept. 1. Mr. Turner is a poor man, with a large family, and the loss must bear heavily on him, as we understand there is no insurance.
 

Subjects: Conway (MA), Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Polish, Poor, Transportation

Posted by stew - Thu, Jan 16, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 18, 1873
(Greenfield) The Catholic picnic on Fri. was held under unfavorable circumstances, but nevertheless was a very successful affair. The rain of the previous day and the cloudy, damp morning doubtless k

(Greenfield) The Catholic picnic on Fri. was held under unfavorable circumstances, but nevertheless was a very successful affair. The rain of the previous day and the cloudy, damp morning doubtless kept many from joining in the festivities. Mass was held at the church in the morning, after which the Fenian Brotherhood, with the Greenfield Cornet Band, proceeded to the depot to receive delegations from Shelburne Falls and South Deerfield. Marching back to Main St., a procession was formed and the column proceeded to the Pierce Grove on Federal St. A great abundance of cake of every description, and other refreshments were contributed by the ladies and sold on the ground. The day was given up to downright enjoyment by the merry picnickers. Dancing was kept up through nearly the whole day, and the Greenfield Band favored the party with several selections of popular Irish airs. The games, which commenced about half past 4, were exciting in the extreme and the source of no little interest. There were 4 contestants in the first sack race, and the first prize was won by http://home.attbi.com/~rascalz/pafc05.htm Martin Shea , and the second by James http://www.enter.net/~bobcostello/name Costello . The second race was won by Costello. The first wheel barrow race, which was a lively affair, was won by http://www.naish.50megs.com/whats_new.html James Kerrigan , and the second by Charlie Hayes. The foot race was won by James Costello. On the high jump the winners were Thomas Corliss and Martin Shea - height 4 ft. 8 inches. Rev. Dennis C. Moran, who has charge of Gardner and neighboring towns, was introduced by Father Quaille and gave an elegant discourse of three quarters of an hour's length, filled with sentiments of friendship for American institutions, and gratitude for all the country had done for her adopted citizens. A noticeable feature of the gathering at the grove was the good order and good feeling that prevailed. There were no officers on the ground on the occasion for their services. Patrick J. Madden was the Marshal of the day. The festivities closed with a ball at Washington Hall, in which about 50 couples participated. Prof. Putnam's Band furnished the music.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Contests, Dance, Deerfield (MA), Food, Greenfield (MA), Irish, Murder, Polish, Religion, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Sports, Trains, Weather, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Nov 25, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 2, 1873
(Conway) Franklin Pease, who lives in that part of Conway called "Poland<

(Conway) http://www.rootsweb.com/~mafrankl/gen/pease.htm Franklin Pease , who lives in that part of Conway called " http://www.mass.gov/...i/polandbrook7b2.htm Poland ", has fattened the past winter 150 sheep, sold 20 of his 70 lambs at $10 per head, and has 40 more nearly ready for market, and has 65 head of beef cattle turned to pasture, besides a plenty of other good stock.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Conway (MA), Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Meat, Polish, Sales

Posted by stew - Mon, Nov 25, 2002

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 2, 1873
A family of Polanders consisting of a man, his wife and 3 children, arrived in Albany last week, and went to live in a miserable hovel, whe

A family of http://www.rootsweb.com/~mnbenton/silesia.htm Polanders consisting of a man, his wife and 3 children, arrived in Albany last week, and went to live in a miserable hovel, where two of the children soon died from exposure. The remaining child is too feeble to last long, and the parents are also in a pitiable condition. No one can understand their language which makes matters worse, but the overseer of the poor is giving tardy assistance.
 

Subjects: Family, Obituaries, Polish, Poor


Powered by manager.webworksserver.com