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Sep 25, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Pittsburgh (PA)

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 21, 1875
Fires

A serious fire occurred at the Brilliant Oil Works http://eastlibertypost.com/history/ 7 miles north of Pittsburg, Pa. [i.e. Pittsburgh] Sat., causing a loss of $150,000, with about $95,000 insurance. It broke out soon after noon in a distillate tank containing 20,000 barrels of oil ready for refining, and from this communicated with another tank containing 20,000 barrels of crude oil, and in less than 10 minutes the 40,000 barrels of oil was one roaring blaze. After burning till near night, the two tanks exploded, and the burning oil was scattered in all directions, setting fire to a warehouse and a large barrel house containing several thousand empty barrels, both of which were destroyed. The fire also communicated to two other tanks of oil, which, with one tank of benzine and two of tar were burned.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Fires, Pittsburgh (PA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 7, 1875
Foreign

Paul Boynton [also known as the Fearless Frogman. See Wikipedia] succeeded in swimming or floating across the English Channel in his patent life saving dress during Friday and Sat. night, after being in the water 23 hours and 38 minutes.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Contests, English (and England), Inventions, Literature / Web Pages, Names, Pittsburgh (PA), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Sports, Stunt performers, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 22, 1875
A husband's mistake

The severe lesson a Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh] man received from his wife, is thus set forth by the Commercial of that city: "The husband had been in the habit of staying out late at night, and on the evening in question, at about 11:30 o'clock, he was standing in front of an Alderman's office, in company with some of his friends, including the magistrate. A woman closely veiled came along, apparently under the influence of liquor.

/ The husband referred to proposed that she be arrested and tried at once. The party took up the suggestion with the idea that there was fun ahead, and the Alderman's office was at once opened, lit up, and the woman brought in. The case was called and the friends stood around to hear the trial. He who had suggested the arrest and trial was forward in the progress of the case, and desiring a view of the face of the female, rudely lifted her veil. His astonishment and mortification may be imagined when he discovered that it was his wife! There was a sudden dispersement of his friends. The wife had been seeking her wandering lord, and had taught him and his friends a lesson that they will not soon forget".
 

Subjects: Courts, Crime, Drunkenness, Government, Jokes, Light, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Pittsburgh (PA), Police, Royalty, Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Oct 1, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 22, 1875
The Beecher trial

The Beecher trial - The cross examination of Tilton closed on Mon. Mr. Tilton testified: "I cannot say if the statement that Mr. Beecher preached on Sunday, to a dozen or more of his mistresses was in the publication of the True Story. I do not remember saying that if Mr. Beecher resigned I would shoot him in the streets. What I did say was that if he published his letter of resignation, which reflected on my family, I would shoot him in the streets, and I most assuredly would have done so. I did not write my wife’s letter of Dec. 7, 1872, neither did I draft it. It was written by her after consultation with me as to the phraseology of a part of it. At the interview, a short time after this, between Mr. Beecher and myself, either this letter of Mr. Tilton’s or a copy of it was shown to him. Mrs. Tilton was present to pronounce upon a card prepared by Mr. Beecher. Mrs. Tilton is an extremely sympathetic woman, willing to yield to the influence of others, and ready to take advice. I knew Elizabeth when I was 10 years old. We became confessed lovers at 16, and were married at 20. When she came to her downfall I found that she was wrapped up in her religious belief, and sinned when in a trance at her teacher’s bidding". Mr. Sherman read a letter from Mr. Tilton to Mrs. Tilton, dated at the Hudson River depot Jan. 2, 1868, declaring that she was all to him that a wife could be, and denouncing himself for his conduct and suspicion of her as a ’whited sepulchre containing dead men’s bones". He thought he had the sweetest family that God ever gave to a man. Another letter dated at Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh] Jan. 30, 1868, referring to a letter from Mrs. Tilton that aft., explained that he was more cheerful, and the knowledge of her love to him was more to him than the world could give, or that he deserved. Another sentence of the same letter stated that his love went out in a great stream to his children, and a great portion of it to her". Kate Cory said she came from Bellevue Hospital, where she had been for several weeks. She then testified as follows: "I was in the service of Mr. Tilton about 6 years ago. When I was there, Mrs. Tilton went to Monticello. I went with her. I saw Mr. Beecher go into Mrs. Tilton’s bedroom, shutting the door after him. when he came in I was in the next room, which was separated by folding doors from it. This was before she went to Monticello. I saw her in the back parlor after her return, sitting on Mr. Beecher’s knee. It was then in the evening, but I saw them distinctly. The folding doors were open. I saw her head on his shoulder and he said "How do you feel, Elizabeth?" and she said "I feel so so". I did not see anything else. This was about 3 weeks after her return from Monticello. Mr. Beecher called 3 or 4 times before she went to Monticello. The reason I left was because of some words I had with Bessie Turner. I think I left in the cold weather but do not remember if it was before or after election. Mr. Tilton then resumed the stand, and was asked what he meant by stating before the investigating committee that to her mother Mrs. Tilton always maintained her innocence. The court decided to allow the question, and the witness replied: "She always said she loved God, and he would not have permitted her to enter into these relations if they were sinful; that it was only an expression of love; that love sometimes conveyed its meaning by a shaking of the hand, most of the time, or by sexual intercourse". Mr. Tilton was finally dismissed form the witness stand Wed. aft., after having occupied it continuously for 12 days - two days longer than Moulton. Joseph Richards said: "I reside at Montclair, N.J., but lived 10 years ago in New York. I am a brother of Mrs. Tilton, and often visited at their house. I have know Henry Ward Beecher. When I was publisher of the Independent I saw him very frequently, probably for 8 years. I probably met Beecher first at the residence of Tilton, when they lived on Oxford Street, but I often saw him at the house on Livingston Street. I do not know how often. I saw Beecher there during the day. I saw him in the parlor of the house. On one occasion I went to the house at 11 o’clock and found him there when I called". Witness explained to the court that he was there by dire necessity and not by his own seeking, and that he was placed in what might be seen as a very cruel position. Witness then continued: On one occasion I called in the morning at the home, and opened the parlor door and saw Beecher in the front room, and Mrs. Tilton making a hasty motion with flushed face and leaving her position beside him, which left an impression on my mind. I cannot say the date of this definitely. I do not know if it was as early as 1868, but it was a number of years ago, and probably was prior to 1870.I went to the open part of the house before I went to the parlor. Beecher was sitting about opposite the front entrance beside the door. Mrs. Tilton was moving toward the front window. I did not remain long in the parlor. The most damaging testimony yet given was given on Fri. by Mrs. Moulton, for years a member of Mr. Beecher’s church. He actually acknowledged to Mrs. Moulton the whole truth of the charge of adultery with Mrs. Tilton. She testified: "On one occasion, when I expressed to Mr. Beecher my wonder that he could preach to young men against the sin of adultery when he was so deeply implicated in it himself. He replied that he was better fitted to do so by the trouble he had passed through.

 

Subjects: Children, Courts, Courtship, Crime, Criminals, Education, Elections, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Furniture, Glass / Windows, Households, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Medicine / Hospitals, Obituaries, Pittsburgh (PA), Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Scandals, Seduction, Sex Crimes, Spiritualism, Trains

Posted by stew - Sun, Jun 5, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 30, 1874
The report that the Pope contemplates appointing two American cardinals receives much credence in Rome. Though an unprecedented event, it is believed to be an eminently wise one, and calculated to st

The report that the Pope contemplates appointing two American cardinals receives much credence in Rome. Though an unprecedented event, it is believed to be an eminently wise one, and calculated to strengthen the influence on the http://www.augustinianrecollects.org/glossary.html holy see in a quarter which has been thoroughly loyal and too much neglected. It is thought the appointments will be made at an early date and that the hats will be conferred on Subjects: Italians, Pittsburgh (PA), Religion, Europe

Posted by stew - Sun, Apr 17, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 30, 1874
The Chicago Times claims to have reliable information that a grand union passenger depot is to be built in that cit

The Chicago Times claims to have reliable information that a http://baseballblog....allblog_archive.html grand union passenger depot is to be built in that city by the following roads centering there: the Chicago and Alton, Chicago and Northwestern, Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh], Fort Wayne & Chicago; Milwaukee and St. Paul; Michigan Central and the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy. The depot will be commenced in the spring, and will occupy the greater portion of the space between Van Buren and Madison Streets and between the canal and the river, and will cost $2,000,000.
 

Subjects: Canals, Economics, Literature / Web Pages, Pittsburgh (PA), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Transportation, Urbanization / Cities, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 16, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Tuesday, November 10, 1874
Early Sun. morning burglars entered the dwelling of Jacob Tell, 224 Federal Street, Pittsburg, Pa. [i.e. Pittsburgh],

Early Sun. morning burglars entered the dwelling of Jacob Tell, http://www.philadelp...j_display.cfm/181644 224 Federal Street, Pittsburg , Pa. [i.e. Pittsburgh], and after carrying away the silverware, and other articles of value, set fire to the house. Mr. Tell was awakened by the crackling of the flames and awoke his family, and all escaped by jumping from the upper windows, except his son Joseph and a servant named Margaret Lynch. Joseph rushed down the stairway through the flames and was seriously burned, while the servant was suffocated in the third story, and her body, blackened and disfigured, was found after the fire was extinguished.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Crime, Criminals, Cutlery, Dreams / Sleep, Family, Fires, Households, Lost and Found, Noise, Pittsburgh (PA), Roads, Robbers and Outlaws, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 26, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, October 5, 1874
Rifles, shot guns, revolvers of every kind. Send stamp for illustrated price list to Great Western Gun Works, Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh], Pa.

Rifles, shot guns, revolvers of every kind. Send stamp for illustrated price list to Great Western Gun Works, Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh], Pa.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Art, Economics, Mail, Pittsburgh (PA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 26, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 21, 1874
Reese, Owen & Co's. Pork House at Pittsburg, Pa. [i.e. Pittsburgh], was burned Monday, at a loss of $40,000, which was fully insured.

Reese, Owen & Co’s. Pork House at Pittsburg, Pa. [i.e. Pittsburgh], was burned Monday, at a loss of $40,000, which was fully insured.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Economics, Fires, Meat, Pittsburgh (PA)

Posted by stew - Sat, May 29, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 7, 1874
(Greenfield) Popkins' cameo and satin pictures are deserving the highest merit. Look at them.

(Greenfield) http://users.net1plu...gy/afbook/afidx.html Popkins ' cameo and satin pictures are deserving the highest merit. Look at them.
 

Subjects: Art, Greenfield (MA), Photographs, Pittsburgh (PA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Apr 25, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 24, 1874
Henry Boettger and John Boettger of Pittsburgh, Pa. have been arrested on suspicion of murdering the wife of Elden Boettger at their place of residence on the Brownsville turnpike road, above Pittsbu

Henry Boettger and John Boettger of Pittsburgh, Pa. have been arrested on suspicion of murdering the wife of Elden Boettger at their place of residence on the Brownsville turnpike road, above Pittsburgh, about 3 weeks ago.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, Family, Households, Murder, Pittsburgh (PA), Police, Roads, Women

Posted by stew - Fri, Apr 9, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 17, 1874
Ulysses S. Grant Jr. and Jesse Grant, sons of the President, Lieut. Otis, and

Ulysses S. Grant Jr. and http://www.lib.siu.edu/projects/usgrant/grant2.htm Jesse Grant , sons of the http://www.mscomm.com/~ulysses/page47.html President , Lieut. Otis, and a son of Thomas Murphy of New York have just accomplished a pedestrian trip of 200 miles, from Huntington Pa. to Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh].
 

Subjects: Family, Government, Pittsburgh (PA), Sports

Posted by stew - Sat, Apr 3, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 10, 1874
Pittsburgh [spelled correctly for the first time!] typographical error: "The Legislature passed the bill over the Governor's head".

Pittsburgh [spelled correctly for the first time!] typographical error: "The Legislature passed the bill over the Governor’s head".
 

Subjects: Businesspeople, Government, Law and Lawyers, Pittsburgh (PA), Spelling

Posted by stew - Wed, Mar 24, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 3, 1874
A deluge at Pittsburg Pa. [i.e. Pittsburgh]

A deluge at http://pghbridges.co...woodsrun_HAER487.htm Pittsburg Pa. [i.e. Pittsburgh] - Nearly 200 lives lost - A tremendous and almost unprecedented fall of rain occurred at Pittsburg and Allegheny City, Pa. Sun. night, swelling the rivers and brooks, and creating new torrents which poured through the narrow gorges and valleys in and over which these cities are built, sweeping everything before them, in manner not unlike the recent Mill River flood, and causing, besides the loss of many lives, the destruction of much property. The extent of territory damaged is not less than 20 to 25 miles in diameter, and how the main portion of Pittsburgh, lying as it does in the center of the circle, escaped further injury appears almost miraculous. A prevailing theory is that the disaster was caused by some kind of water spout, and indeed, a gentleman who watched the storm from a point a few miles down the river, where there was little rain, says that by the fitful flashes of lightning he could see a large, inky black, funnel shaped cloud which overhung the city, the narrow end being lowest, while the dark parts gave vent to almost continuous flashes of lightning. To get a fair idea of the disaster one needs to be familiar with the geography of the locality. The main city of Pittsburg, as it rises gradually from a point formed by the junction of the Monongahela and Allegheny Rivers, has many gulches in certain localities, which, under a flood of this description are liable to do great damage, and the part known as the hill region is frequently liable to suffer from local inundations. The damage here, however, is at this time light, compared with other localities strictly suburban. The north bank of the Alleghany [i.e. Allegheny], upon whose hill sides and on whose valleys the upper portion of the city is located, has this time become the scene of the greatest damage. The work of destruction commenced at a point 2 miles north of the central portion of Allegheny City. http://www.pittsburg...k/ask00/ya42600.html Butcher's Run valley at its mouth is probably between 400 and 500 ft. wide, and at the point where the work of destruction commenced it is not more than 150 ft. wide. Between North Avenue and this northerly point numerous ravines empty into http://www.allegheny...y=2004&cal_searchm=7 Butcher's Run Valley . Along this run the houses were built directly over the natural water course, culverts being made and used in part as foundations for the dwellings. The line of destruction followed the water course to the river, and involved an immense number of houses that were not on the line of the culverts. When the rain commenced falling but little apprehension was entertained, but those who lived near the head of the valley state that suddenly it seemed as if the heavens were opened and the water came down as if discharged from immense pipes. The volume was so great that the valley was filled with a raging torrent. The frame dwellings, stables, and slaughter houses gave way like pipestems, and the debris from the wrecks were swept down along the line of plank road, the weight being augmented every moment. In the district lying west of Chestnut Street, and north of a line parallel with North Avenue, the water rose to the height of fully 20 feet. In some places the occupants of the houses were unable to escape, and in many places the force of the water rent the structures into splinters. After taking away a large number of fences and out houses, the flood struck the dwelling occupied by Henry Maltern, wife and two children, all of whom were drowned. The next house was that of John Winkler, who found the flood endangering his barn and stock. He, with his brother, started out to the horses. Mrs. Winkler remained in the house and in less than 5 minutes, all the lower rooms were filled with water. Mrs. W. called for assistance, but before it could reach her the building gave way and she was engulfed. Further south was the dwelling of John Shearing. As soon as the water commenced rising, Shearing moved his family, consisting of his wife and twin boys, aged 4 years, to the hill side, in what he supposed a place of safety. The children were sleeping soundly, but one of the little fellows were aroused by the storm and rolled over an embankment into the angry flood below. His body has since been recovered. The extensive glue works were the next to succumb to the action of the water, and were totally destroyed. A short distance below these works was a small dwelling occupied by August Rykoff and family, embracing wife and two children. They were unaware of the destruction sweeping down upon them, and, with the building, were carried down the stream. Mrs. Rykoff, bruised and bleeding, was rescued from the torrent several squares distant, but the remainder of the family were drowned. On the corner of East Street and Madison Avenue the water seemed to deviate. In a triangular house at the intersection of these streets resided Mrs. Conlon [also seen as http://boards.ancest...and.mea.general/1017 Mary Conlin ] with 4 children; a young man named Arnold and a cripple named Rogers were also in the house. All were lost except Niel Conlon. Young Arnold had gone into the house to rescue some of the inmates, but fell a victim to the destroying flood. About a block below the intersection of Madison AVenue and East Street the torrent again united and swept down with redoubled violence to the low lands, embracing Concord, Ahara and a portion of Chestnut Streets. The course of the flood was probably 200 ft. wide, and frame and brick buildings fell before the devastating element as though they had been of sand. Dwellings, stores, workshops and debris of all kinds mingled together in one confused mass, making it impossible to discover even the street lines. In some instances houses were literally turned upside down. Off Ahara Street, the dwelling of Alderman Bolster was reduced to its original elements and one of his children drowned; the rest of the family escaped. On the same street resided a family consisting of Jacob Fuches and wife and one child, and Joseph, a brother of Mrs. Fuches, and the adjoining house contained Jacob Metzler, wife and two children, all of them, except one child, were lost; their bodies were found. On Chestnut Street, on the intersection of Spring Garden AVenue, the water attained a depth of fully 20 ft., but the buildings withstood the force better, and in only one instance was any serious damage done. A large frame building, occupied as a beer hall, was moved from the foundation, and floated directly across the street, completely obstructing the way. In charter's Valley [i.e. Chartier's Valley], a stream which runs parallel with http://www.pittsburg...arch/ask/yaarch.html Saw Mill Run and empties into the Ohio River three miles below, the loss of life is reported very great. All the little runs emptying into Charter's Creek became rushing rivers. On Bush Run the fences and bridges are all gone, and a great deal of valuable property destroyed. The loss of human life has been frightful. At McLaughlin's Run 11 persons were drowned, among them a whole family named McLean being swept away. At Swift's Iron Works 14 empty barges were torn loose and carried into the Ohio, together with the new iron steamer "Alexander Swift". The latter boat was safely landed at West Covington. Blyck & Phillips lost 6 barges, most of them containing coal. T.J. Williamson's Coal Elevator Company lost 12 barges, and a float with twelve cars was washed away. Several very affecting incidents are reported. A young and beautiful girl in her night clothes with long golden hair, was seen on her knees in an upper chamber of a floating building, engaged in supplication. The house struck against a brick building, and for a moment its mad course was stayed. Immediately she was seen to rush to the window and stretch forth her white arms into the night, as though mutely appealing for help. A moment later, and the building had fallen, and was whorling on into the seething vortex, and she was not seen again. The last woman found Mon. night was a young mother. Close to her breast she held her young babe, in a grasp so tight that it was several moments before it could be released. Her face and that of her child's was not mutilated in the least. Many were discovered in positions which told that they had not yielded without a struggle. Strong men were found with their clothing torn from their bodies. Women and children were found in all attitudes and positions, some with the agonizing throes of the death struggle written plainly on their faces; some with their hands cut and bleeding from having come in contact with the nails and splinters in their vain grasping for life. The loss of life is now estimated at nearly 200 persons, and may probably exceed that number. The extent of the territory damaged is not less than 20 to 25 miles in diameter. In Pittsburgh and Allegheny City the people appear to be going to work very manfully, to clear up the ruins and to provide for the wants of the sufferers from their locality. It seems to be the intention of the Pennsylvanians to meet this sudden emergency from their own resources. There seems to be no adequate explanation of the phenomenon by which the cities were deluged. There is no reason, however, for the statement that it was caused by a water spout. It is most likely that the flood came from what is called a cloudburst, which after all, is only a more sudden fall of water than is usual in the heaviest thunder storms. A baby was found in a crib floating in the Ohio River at the head of http://www.bchistory.../NavigatorM1976.html Montgomery Island , 32 miles below Pittsburg Wed. aft., and was rescued by Mr. Allen, who lives near the island. The child was living and proved to be one of the Hunter children. Returns received at the County Commissioner's office show that 20 bridges were swept away by the flood in the county, entailing a loss of about $40,000. In the Butcher's Run district alone, it is estimated that more than 20,000,000 cubic feet of water fell in an hour and a half.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Astronomy, Barber / Hair, Bars (Drinking establishments), Bridges, Business Enterprises, Charlemont (MA), Children, Coal, Disasters, Dreams / Sleep, Economics, Family, Fashion, Floods, Furniture, Government, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Handicapped, Households, Lightning, Liquors, Lost and Found, Meat

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 13, 1874
A fire which originated in the carpenter shop of Creswell & Burgoin at Alleghany City [i.e. the North Side, Pittsburgh] Sat. the 4th, it is supposed from fire crackers thrown by boys at play in the n

A fire which originated in the carpenter shop of Creswell & Burgoin at Alleghany City [i.e. the North Side, Pittsburgh] Sat. the 4th, it is supposed from fire crackers thrown by boys at play in the neighborhood. At one time it was feared that the whole upper part of the city would be destroyed, as the supply of water was limited, and a very high wind prevailed. But with the united effort of the Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh] and Alleghany City [ http://www.burnsfireworks.com/Early%20Years.htm Allegheny City ] fire departments, the flames were brought under control about 6 o'clock in the eve. Over 100 houses in all were destroyed, leaving many families homeless. The loss cannot now be estimated, but it will probably reach $300,000.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Business Enterprises, Charlemont (MA), Children, Disasters, Family, Fires, Holidays, Households, Pittsburgh (PA), Urbanization / Cities, Weather

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 20, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 13, 1874
The International Scull Race

The International Scull Race - The 5 mile race between http://collections.ic.gc.ca/rowing/ReNc154.htm George Brown of Halifax N.S., and William Scharff of Pittsburg, Pa. [i.e. Pittsburgh], for $2000 a side and the championship of America, was rowed on the Connecticut, opposite springfield, Wed. aft. Both men were in excellent condition, and the water was as smooth as could be desired. Scharff soon took the lead and held it for about a mile, when Brown overhauled him, and thereafter kept ahead until the end of the race. At the turning stake Brown was about a length ahead, and during the first mile of the home stretch increased his lead several lengths. During the last mile, however, Scharff made occasional spurts and somewhat reduced the distance between the two boats, but Brown had the race in his own hands, and came in ahead in 16 minutes 45 seconds. The race was perfectly fair throughout, an honest trial, in which Brown proved himself the better man. Large amounts of money changed hands on the result of the race. Brown was the favorite in the betting.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Connecticut River, Contests, Economics, Gambling, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Pittsburgh (PA), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Sports, Transportation, Canada

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 24, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 15, 1874
The Alleghany car works [actually the Allegheny Car and Transportation Company] near Swissvale Pa. were burned Wed. at a cost of $40,000.

The Alleghany car works [actually the http://members.aol.com/tompkinspj/swisvale.htm Allegheny Car and Transportation Company ] near Swissvale Pa. were burned Wed. at a cost of $40,000. The insurance was $20,000.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Fires, Pittsburgh (PA), Trains

Posted by stew - Thu, Jan 15, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 25, 1872
John Jenkins recently got drunk at Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh] Pa., and visited a furnace, where he fell, headfirst, between a pair of heavy, iron rollers and was dragged between the huge cylinders t

John Jenkins recently got drunk at Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh] Pa., and visited a furnace, where he fell, headfirst, between a pair of heavy, iron rollers and was dragged between the huge cylinders to the opposite side. His body passed through a space less than 10 inches in width and came out a sickening mass of flesh, bones and blood.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Business Enterprises, Drunkenness, Pittsburgh (PA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 12, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 19, 1872
The failure of the Fisher Brothers at Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh] Pa. causes great excitement in oil circles there. Their liab

The failure of the http://www.history.r.../tarbell/UPTO103.HTM Fisher Brothers at Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh] Pa. causes great excitement in oil circles there. Their liabilities are believed to be over $1,000,000, but they ask time to make everything good.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Economics, Family, Pittsburgh (PA), Rich People

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 10, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 1, 1874
Female crusaders against the rumsellers of Hillsboro O. were arrested Fri., and 2 of the most prominent leaders were fined $25 each, and a man accompanying them was fined $30 and costs. On Sat. 40 we

Female crusaders against the rumsellers of Hillsboro O. were arrested Fri., and 2 of the most prominent leaders were fined $25 each, and a man accompanying them was fined $30 and costs. On Sat. 40 were arrested at Pittsburgh Pa. [i.e. Pittsburgh Pa] for obstructing the streets.
 

Subjects: Bars (Drinking establishments), Economics, Liquors, Pittsburgh (PA), Police, Roads, Sales, Temperance, Women

Posted by stew - Thu, Jan 1, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 1, 1872
A man kills his sister's paramour

A man kills his sister's paramour - A Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh] Pa. dispatch gives details of the fatal shooting of William Hatfield, a man of large family, a deputy sheriff and prominent member of the Knights of Pythias, by Ambrose Lynch, a well known base ball player, because the latter discovered Hatfield to be his sister's paramour. Lynch resides with his sister in http://pre1900prints...tsburghAlleghany.htm Alleghany [i.e. Allegheny] City, and returning home after midnight heard voices in her room. Approaching the door he attempted to push it open. The door, after a good deal of exertion on his part, flew from its fastenings, and he immediately jumped in. The lamp threw a dim glare on the bed, from which he saw his sister emerge and also Lynch quietly on the other side. The sister attempted to push her brother from the apartment, but he felled her to the floor, and rushing toward the bed stabbed the aroused occupant twice with a knife. Then ensued a scuffle, in which the three participated. Lynch struck the man again with the knife in the region of the heart. He ran into the street, and died without a struggle and without a word. Lynch surrendered himself and gave up the knife, remarking that he had found the man in bed with his sister, and if Jesus Christ was to come down from heaven, and if he should catch him in the same position, he would serve him the same way he served Hatfield. Mrs. Teels, the sister of Lynch, is about 36 years old. She has a husband whom she refuses to live with, on account, as she alleges, of his worthlessness.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Courtship, Crime, Criminals, Family, Marriage and Elopement, Murder, Pittsburgh (PA), Police, Religion, Sex Crimes, Sports, Women

Posted by stew - Fri, Dec 19, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 4, 1874
A family of 6 persons murdered near Pitsburgh

A family of 6 persons murdered near Pitsburgh - A shocking tragedy occurred Thurs. at Homestead, a place six miles west from Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh] Pa. The house of http://www.15122.com...ITIES/WMSettlers.htm John Hammett was burned, and the entire family, comprising Hammett, his wife, two children, hired man, and a boy whom they were raising, 6 persons in all, were burned to death. But two recognizable bodies were found. One of the bodies showed that the throat had been cut, and it is considered almost certain that the entire family were murdered. Suspicion rests upon a young man in their employ on the place, named Earnest Love [actually Earnest Ortwein], who is missing.
 

Subjects: Children, Crime, Criminals, Family, Fires, Households, Missing Persons, Murder, Orphans and Orphanages, Pittsburgh (PA), Women, Work

Posted by stew - Fri, Dec 19, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 16, 1871
One of the too frequent stories of matrimonial infelicity, culminating at Pittsburg, Pa. last week, merits notice. Mrs. Ann Norris visited the Mayor of the city to require the arrest of her husband,

One of the too frequent stories of matrimonial infelicity, culminating at Pittsburg, Pa. last week, merits notice. Mrs. Ann Norris visited the Mayor of the city to require the arrest of her husband, Henry, who had run away to Chicago with his "light o love" of some 2 years, Alice Gravesides. The two had secured her commitment to an http://www.hti.umich...71.0002.001&view=toc insane asylum in the summer of 1869, such derangement as she had being solely due to their illicit mutual affection. She was released from there a few weeks ago and ascertained that Gravesides had been living with her husband at intervals for some 10 months.
 

Subjects: Government, Insanity, Marriage and Elopement, Pittsburgh (PA), Sex Crimes, Women

Posted by stew - Wed, Dec 17, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 7, 1870
A lady in Wapakonetta, Ohio recently desired her daughter to play the "fashionable new Malady she got from A lady in http://www.heritagep...Seneca/SenChapII.htm Wapakonetta, Ohio recently desired her daughter to play the "fashionable new Malady she got from http://isu.indstate.edu/jspeer/conservation/ Pittsburg last week"
 

Subjects: Fashion, Music, Pittsburgh (PA), Women, Words

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2003

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 27, 1874
(Greenfield) Rev. P.V. Finch [Peter V. Finch], who has resided in Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh], Pa. since resigning the rectorship of St. James Church of this town, will this week move with his family

(Greenfield) Rev. P.V. Finch [Peter V. Finch], who has resided in Pittsburg [i.e. Pittsburgh], Pa. since resigning the rectorship of St. James Church of this town, will this week move with his family [an interesting item is that his grand-daughter, http://library.mcmas...fonds/r/russelle.htm Edith Finch , would marry http://www.univie.ac...ry/photo_gallery.htm Bertrand Russell in 1952, and would support him in many http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~bertrand/ social activist causes ] to Denver, Colorado, to take charge of St. John's Episcopal Church of that place.
 

Subjects: Emigration and Immigration, Family, Greenfield (MA), Pittsburgh (PA), Religion, Women, Work


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