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Sep 25, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Literature / Web Pages

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
John Chinaman in New York

John Chinaman in New York - The New York Tribune describes the haunts of the Chinese in that city as follows:

In the Sixth Ward is a small district where most of the Chinese in New York live. A visitor to their opium smoking dens may go to Baxter Street, just below Franklin, where was formerly Donovan’s lane, the resort of the most desperate villains in the city, but which is now a Y-shaped court shut in on all sides by high tenement houses.

On the ground floor of one of these buildings is the establishment of "Old John", a Chinaman 74 years old, who has been in the United States 47 years, and was the first of his race to become naturalized. His quarters comprise three rooms. By the door is seated his assistant, who gives out the drug. Upon one side of the room is a low platform or dais; sometimes there are two, one above the other, like births upon which men are to be seen reclining in the different stages of opium intoxication. [How interesting - guess that’s where the word ’berths’ comes from].

The pipes consist of a bamboo stem and a porcelain bowl about 2 inches in diameter, in the centre [sic] of which is a small receptacle for the opium. A small piece of the drug is taken up on an iron rod and heated until it is dried to a proper consistency. Then it is inserted into the pipe, and the smoker slowly draws the smoke through, soon filling the whole room with a peculiar smell.

The proprietor furnishes his customers with pipes and a place to lie down. The drug is weighed out upon a rude pair of reed scales. The weight used is a silver coin. Each smoker is provided with a small horn box, which will contain about 15 cents’ worth of opium, enough to last an average smoker all night. The preparation is undoubtedly adulterated, since it costs the druggist $23.50 a pound.

A few doors below, on the same side, is another place where smoking is carried on, which does not differ materailly from Old John’s. There is, however, a temple connected with it. On the wall is hung a gayly [sic] painted picture of some Chinese god, at whose shoulder, on one side, man’s good angel is represented, and on the other, his evil angel.

The faces are very grotesque, and resemble those painted upon tea chests. Hanging upon the picture are numerous tinsel and paper flowers, with faces painted upon the petals, and a little below the picture is a shrine upon which stand two candles, to be lighted only upon festival occasions.

In the middle is a dish containing sand, in which are the burned fragments of several joss sticks. The pious Celestial lights one of these, and placing it in the sand on the altar prays to his deity. From the ceiling hangs two Chinese lanterns, and there is also a glass vessel containing some kind of vegetable oil in which floats a burning wick.

A cup of the same oil is placed in the shrine for the especial use of the god. Upon the wall are hung bulletin boards where the news which agitates the Chinese world is pasted. A curious scroll, resembling the red cover on a pack of fire crackers, attracts attention and proves to be a directory of business of the principal Chinese merchants in San Francisco.
 

Subjects: Art, Beverages, Births, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Chinese, Criminals, Drug Abuse, Drugstores / Drugs, Economics, Emigration and Immigration, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Furniture, Glass / Windows, Households, Light, Literature / Web Pages, Names, Old Age, Racism, Religion, Roads, Smoking and Tobacco

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The first colored Senator Reverend H.R. Revels



The first colored Senator Reverend H.R. Revels [Hiram R. Revels] - A correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial writes from Holly Springs, Mississippi, as follows concerning ex-Senator Revels, now a Methodist minister near there: "When we entered the door of the plain white frame meeting house, it was filled with worshipers. The Pastor is held in high esteem by his flock at home.

He is both law maker and shepard [i.e. shepherd], statesman and preacher. His party has put an "Hon." [Honorable] before his name, and a college of his church has put a "D.D." [Doctor of Divinity" behind it. He cane home from Washington City as pure as he went,which cannot be said of every white Senator [or ANY Senator these days]...



Pastor Revels is a man of about 30, rather below medium height, with wide perceptive faculties, and a face remarkably bland and winning. He is a light mulatto,with eyes tinged with blue. He is comely, graceful and dignified, and in manner as polite as Chesterfield, without the least affectation.

His voice is strong and rich of accordant tones, his modulation distinct, his sentences models of compact English. You can almost see his punctuation points as he speaks, so exactly measured and as symmetrical as his diction. His gestures are mostly with the forearm, hand and finger, as if he would paint on canvas every shade of his meaning, and touch delicately every color of flower in his rhetoric.

There is no bombast, no trick of syllable or scare of sound. He just talks to you right out in an earnest, straightforward way, and you are arrested, interested, affected and helped by what he says. All this from a farm chattel - a United States Senator, a self-made man.

But he is far in advance of his race. He is a pioneer. Well might his colored substitute in the pulpit, a preacher black as ebony, referring to Pastor Revels in his public prayer, beseech blessings upon the head of "de old, leader of the army". We "heard a white amen to that. And he has an army of a congregation!"

It is much above the average in intelligence, and the order and attention excellent. The Pastor’s influence over the people is marvelous. He can sway a thousand people by a gesture or a word. He said to us that strange as certain demonstrations might seem, it was paradise in order and sweetness to what it had been in former days.


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Art, Education, Eye, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Noise, Politics, Racism, Religion, Scandals, War / Weaponry, Words, Work

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Why she didn’t catch it



Why she didn’t catch it - One of our prominent merchants was informed a day or two since , when he went home to tea, that there was a mouse in the sitting room; it had run in there during the afternoon, and they had shut the door to keep it in until someone came to catch it. "Well, why didn’t YOU catch it?" said the gentleman to his wife as he started for the sitting room, banging the door pretty sharply behind him.

The ladies - there were 2 or 3 callers present - waited in breathless silence and were soon startled by a yell that sent the lady of the house into a swoon and one of the callers to the rescue.



Opening the door, there was the gentleman with his pants half off, both hands grasping the antipodes of the small of his back,and he executing a Modoc war dance in the middle of the room.

The lady said "What is it?" The gentleman said "You clear out and call my wife". Soon as cold water and camphor had revived her, the lady of the house went in and quiet soon was restored. Inquiry elicited the fact that when the gentleman went in and discovered the mouse he went for it at once, and the mouse went up the leg of his pantaloons and got in such a position that he could not be shook out, and fearing that he would bite as well as scratch, he seized him with both hands, and then found it impossible to get his pants off alone.When the mouse was finally removed his wife quietly remarked "You see now why I didn’t catch it". The gentleman said he did. (Faribault Democrat) [Minnesota].


 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Beverages, Businesspeople, Dance, Households, Jokes, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Masculinity (Machismo), Medicine / Hospitals, Native Americans, Noise, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Clothing, Water

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Centennial bell



The Troy Times has the following description of the new bell which is to be cast for Independence Hall, Philadelphia:

Meneely & Kimberley of this city, who are making a bell of 13,000 pounds for the tower of Old Independence Hall in Philadelphia...have received permission to select several cannon from those now in store at the W[?] Arsenal, to be cast in the bell. [A short article follows].
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Fairs, Heritage Activities, History, Literature / Web Pages, War / Weaponry, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Bummers in San Francisco

Bummers in San Francisco ... San Francisco has a ...full ... of bummers. Nowhere else can a worthless fellow too lazy to work, too cowardly to steal, get on so well. The climate befriends him, for he can sleep out of doors 4/5 of the year, and the free lunch opens to him boundless vistas of carnal delights. He can gorge himself daily, for a nominal sum get a dinner that a king would envy for 50 cents.




There are two classes of saloons where the midday repasts are furnished - two-bit places and one-bit places. In the first he gets a drink and a meal. In the second he gets a drink and a meal of inferior quality. He pays for the drink, 25 or 15 cents, according to the grade of the place, and gets his meal for nothing.



This consists of,in the better class of establishment, soup, boiled salmon, roast beef of the best quality, bread and butter, potatoes, tomatoes, crackers, and cheese.
Many of these places are fitted up in a style of Oriental grandeur. A stragner entering one of them casually might be under the delusion that he had found his way by mistake to the salon of a San Francisco millionaire.

He would find mirrors reaching from floor to ceiling, carpets of the finest texture and most appropriate patterns, massive tables covered with papers and periodicals, the walls embellished with expensive paintings. A large picture which had adorned a famous drink bar and free lunch house was sold the other day for $12,500. Some of the keepers are men of education and culture. One is an art critic of high local repute, who has written ...very readable...San Francisco. Scribner’s.

[After struggling to read this, I found it to be an excerpt of Scribner’s Monthly, July 1875, "The city of the Golden Gate", by Samuel Williams, p. 274].


 

Subjects: Art, Chinese, Dreams / Sleep, Economics, Education, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Furniture, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Meat, Rich People, Robbers and Outlaws, Royalty, Sales, Tramps, Vendors and Purchasers, Weather, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Clara Morris



Clara Morris - a terrible surgical operation - The wonderful surgical operation performed on the person of Clara Morris, the well known New York actress, in Paris, is described in a letter from a friend of that lady. "Miss Morris’ disease was curvature of the spine.Treated years ago, it could probably have been arrested, but it was a crisis in her profession, and upon success in surmounting many obstacles, her whole future seemed to depend, and she could not spare time for a medical treatment.



A sea voyage failed entirely to produce any change for the better, and a list of the highest medical authorities abroad confirmed her worst fears and condemned her to a horrible operation, the same which Charles Sumner submitted to, for the cure of the same disease. Its main feature is the burning of the flesh of the back from the neck down to the waist with red hot irons.



The operation was performed in Paris, in the presence of Mrs. Worthington, Miss Gabrielle Greeley and Sir William Belmore, the attending physician. Miss Gabrielle Greeley also writes a letter to a New Yorker in which she says "Poor Clara was obliged to sit on a low chair with her back bared, and she went through the operation with her face pale and rigid as marble. Dr. Belvin lit his furnace, and the roaring of the flames that was to heat the iron to a white heat in a few seconds was dreadful to hear, and while this was going on Professor Ball marked with a pencil the line the iron was to follow on either side of the spine.

Every touch of the pencil sent a thrill through the delicate frame of the poor victim, but the Professor had scarcely ended making the penciled marks when with a flash the iron was applied. It was dreadful. The white point seemed to sink an inch into the quivering form, and it was all over. The doctor said it was a wonderful exhibit of nerves."


 

Subjects: Diseases, Fires, French, Furniture, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Politics, Quacks and Quackery, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Show Business, Transportation, Vacations, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Marriages

Married in Holyoke Sept. 8, Frederick H. Warner of Boston to Eleanor Skinner, eldest daughter of William Skinner.

[For more information, see Google Books "Encyclopedia of Massachusetts, biographical--genealogical, Volume 6"
by William Richard Cutter].
 

Subjects: Boston (MA), Family, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Massachusetts, Rich People

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Heath

Heath - Messrs.Editors: The death of our most aged mother and much beloved neighbor and friend, Mrs. Martha Spooner, widow of the late Philip Spooner, who died at her home in Heath with her son Deacon N.W. Spooner Aug. 21, aged 96 years, she being the oldest person in town - is deemed worthy of something more than a passing notice.

For more than 60 years the deceased was a resident of this town. Left in early life with a large family of children, almost entirely dependent on her labor for support, she neverthless maintained them in comfort and respectability, early training them to habitual industry, temperance and frugality, teaching them to reverence the Sabbath and be guided by the principles and precepts of God's word...
 

Subjects: Contests, Economics, Family, Households, Literature / Web Pages, Obituaries, Old Age, Religion, Temperance, Widows and Widowers, Women, Words, Work, Heath (MA)

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - Drs. E.C. Coy and E.R. Campbell, late of Saxon River, Vt. have gone into partnership, and will at once open a drug store in Schuler’s Block in the store lately occupied by A.W. Stevens.

[Read more about Dr.Campbell in the "History of the town of Rockingham, Vermont, including the villages of Bellows Falls, Saxtons River, Rockingham, Cambridgeport and Bartonsville, 1753-1907, with family genealogies" on Internet Archive]
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Drugstores / Drugs, Emigration and Immigration, Family, History, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Montague (MA), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Stores, Retail, Turners Falls (MA), Vermont

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Rev. Mr. Warfield of Greenfield, who was instrumental in getting up the protest of the Franklin County clergymen against Mr. Beecher's preaching at Lake Pleasant, and who bore the protest to Mr. Beecher at the Twin Mountain House, is man enough to publish a letter in the Greenfield Gazette, vindicating the motives of Mr.Beecher in making his engagement, and rebuking that paper for its unjust and uncharitable statement -- Springfield Union.

We deny that our statement was uncharitable to Mr.Beecher, or intentionally unjust. Mr.Warfield and every clergyman who signed the protest presented by Mr. Warfield to Mr. Beecher, and a large majority of the people of this vicinity, approved of our article and were glad to see it. It was the first thing that opened Mr. Beecher's eyes to the nature of his engagement.

The only thing stated, not strictly correct, was that Mr. Beecher was to receive compensation for his services. Whether people go back on us or not, the Gazette & Courier will not hesitate at all times to advocate an observance of the Sabbath and good morals for the community in which it circulates.
 

Subjects: Economics, Eye, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Hotels, Lake Pleasant (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), New Hampshire, Religion, Scandals

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items



Greenfield - Frank Lansing Grinnell, who met his death by a sad and singular accident at Bridgeport, CT, was a son of George B. Grinnell of New York, and a grandson of Hon. George Grinnell of this town. He had just graduated at Yale and was about entering into business. A most exemplary young man, and fond of outdoor exercise and amusements, including the game of baseball in which he was skilled.

At the time of the accident, he was at Bridgeport to take part in a match game. Previous, while endeavoring to catch a flying ball, he stepped backward, unawares, into the line of 2 young men who were passing a ball, before they perceived it. The ball was the hardest on the ground, and thrown by the most powerful pitcher of the club, and struck young Grinnell on the back of the head, just at the base of the skull.

He fell instantly, and was soon after taken to the house of Hon. W.D. Bishop, where he received every attention possible. His friends arrived as soon as telegraph and steam could bring them. He remained unconscious until Friday, when he seemed to recognize them, and hope revived among his friends; but he sunk away and died on Saturday eve.

He was much beloved by his classmates and others in college, and only 2 weeks ago spent several days with his grandparents, where he met many acquaintances who mourn his early death.

[Additional information can be found in the
1875-1876 Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University online].
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Amusements, Businesspeople, Connecticut, Education, Family, Greenfield (MA), Households, Literature / Web Pages, Obituaries, Sports, Telegraphs / Telephones, Transportation

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Greenfield - A number of our citizens, principally ladies, were taken in some weeks ago by a fellow pretending to be getting subscribers for a periodical called "Cottage Hearth".They paid their money, and when, after waiting a reasonable time the periodical did not make its appearance, they wrote to the publisher. They were told that no such agent had been engaged and they had been swindled. Moral: don't trust book agents, etc. with your money until you get the equivalent, and still better, don't have anything to do with them.


 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Households, Literature / Web Pages, Robbers and Outlaws, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 31, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Greenfield - Francis B. Wells, son of Elisha Wells of Deerfield, who has for some years been a clerk in Howland & Lowell’s drug store, is taking a course of study in the College of Pharmacy, New York.

[See the Internet Archive’s "Greenfield Directory" for 1885 to see his listing].


 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Deerfield (MA), Drugstores / Drugs, Education, Family, Greenfield (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Stores, Retail, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Conway

Conway - We saw an item 2 or 3 weeks since in the "Courier" speaking of a sudden death while swearing, reported by another paper as occurring at Burkeville, etc., contradicted by a correspondent, the item belonging to Burkville, Kentucky, not Conway, Mass. Perhaps there are but few living in our town who know that such an incident really did occur in our midst many years ago, living witnesses attesting the truth at the present time, called to remembrance by the item mentioned.

The facts were these, as nearly as I could gather them: a colored man by the name of James Hall, living or standing near the house now occupied by Russell Bond, was swearing fearfully, blaspheming the name of God because there had been a religious interest in the place and his wife was converted.

Wishing to join the church, she applied for baptism - we think for the Baptist Church here - and was accepted. Her husband’s anger was roused, and while terrible oaths were on his lips, swearing that the rite should not be administered to her, he fell forward dead!

"God fearing" may be our community, as a class both then and now, but is it not rather the mercy of Heaven that spares the swearer from alike state? It is not OUR goodness which keeps men alive, not even in Christian Conway!

[There actually is a Burkesville, Kentucky - see Wikipedia].


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Conway (MA), Households, Jokes, Literature / Web Pages, Names, Obituaries, Religion, Women, Words, Superstition

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Conway

Conway - With the cooler weather comes rumors of the re-occurrence of diphtheria in some sections. Lottie Brown, oldest daughter of Addison Brown, Broomshire district, died on Sept. 13. The child’s mother is also seriously ill, and one or two other members of the family are also sick. Many hearts will ache at this sad intelligence.

[See p. 35 of Google Books "Sightseeking: Clues to the Landscape History of New England" to discover how Broomshire got its name].
 

Subjects: Children, Conway (MA), Diseases, Family, History, Literature / Web Pages, Names, Obituaries, Weather

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Bloody Brook Bi-Centennial

A memorable celebration - The 200th anniversary of the massacre of Captain Thomas Lathrop and the "Flower of Essex"

http://www.memorialh.../lesson5/bloody.html

by the Indians of Bloody Brook, occurred on Sat. the 18th, and was celebrated by services of commemoration at S. Deerfield on Fri. the 17th. Held in connection with the celebration was the Sixth Annual Field meeting of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association...We doubt if ever South Deerfield witnessed such an influx of strangers as thronged to her beautiful streets on this pleasant morning. From a radius of many miles they came...

(For a complete account of the event, please see p. 283+ of Google Books 'History and proceedings of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association'].

[The account itself takes up 4 long columns in the paper, so please take advantage of the Google Books account!]
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Food, Heritage Activities, History, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Native Americans, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

Mrs. Jones of North Somerville found the other day, a loving letter to Mr. Jones from a New York woman, and the next day discovered another; whereupon she broke a chair and two pitchers over her husband's head and tried to shoot him with a pistol. He succeeded in disarming her, when she took a dose of strychnine, but so large a one as to overdo the business.


 

Subjects: Furniture, Literature / Web Pages, Poisoning, Scandals, Seduction, Suicide, War / Weaponry, Wife Abuse, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

Prof. Marsh was examined Mon. by the Red Cloud Investigating Commission. The cross examination was quite rigid and left the Professor in a very embarrassing position. He was unable to sustain any of the charges from his own personal knowledge.

He was pressed particularly close to ascertain whether he had any specific evidence to sustain the charge of criminal negligence on the part of Secretary Delano. He had only hearsay evidence...

[See Google Books "The Magazine of American History with notes and queries, Volume 23" for an explanation of this issue].

 

Subjects: Archaeology, Crime, Criminals, Education, Food, Government, History, Literature / Web Pages, Native Americans, Politics, Science

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

William Knapp, aged 90, died at Newburyport on Sun. He was one of the first abolitionists and the brother of Isaac Knapp, the original partner of Garrison in the Liberator. He was one of the oldest Freemasons in the State, and was Master of a Lodge 60 years ago.

[See the Internet Archive's full text of "History of Newburyport, Mass., 1764-1905].
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Clubs, Family, Freemasonry, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Obituaries, Old Age

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Hampshire County items



Chauncey Wright, a native of Northampton, and an instructor of physics at Harvard college, died suddenly of heart disease Sun. He was a graduate of Harvard in 1852, at one time lecturer on metaphysics at Agassiz school at Cambridge, and was a well known writer on Darwinism and kindred topics in the North American Review, New York Nation, etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chauncey_Wright
 

Subjects: Diseases, Education, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Literature / Web Pages, Obituaries, Science, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 23, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Isaac Merritt Singer



Isaac Merritt Singer - This eminent mechanician died at his residence at Old Paignton, near Torquay, England on July 23, 1875, in the 64th year of his age.

[Read more about Isaac Singer, the inventor of the Singer Sewing Machine Company at Wikipedia].


 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, English (and England), Inventions, Literature / Web Pages, Obituaries

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Married

Married in South Deerfield Sept 8, Frank P. Joy of Greenville, Ill. to Louise A. Maynard of South Deerfield.

[See Google Books "Genealogy of the Descendants of John White of Wenham and Lancaster, Massachusetts" by Almira Larkin White].
 

Subjects: Deerfield (MA), Emigration and Immigration, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Massachusetts

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Hampshire County items

Hampshire County items - Fuller of the Round Hill Hotel has played a sharp and dishonorable game on the Gazette establishment. They have sued him for fraud, and we hope they will convict him. It is not often a man attempts to boldly do such an act. Northampton business men appear to be in a bad way.

http://www.dailyhamp...fm?id_no=73000072005
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Courts, Economics, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Hotels, Literature / Web Pages

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Catamount Hill Reunion



Catamount Hill Reunion - The sun never shone upon a jollier band than was gathered on Catamount HiIl at the Reunion on Sept. 1. The day was all that could be expected, and everyone seemed to partake of its joyousness. The company from Adams, together with a delegation from the west, preluded the occasion by riding though the Hoosac Tunnel and viewing the wonderful work thereof.

Then on up the mountain they went, stopping ever and anon to hear an old time story, from Paul, Henry, or Chauncey, and maybe from the Dr., to say nothing of the Professor from the Hub. At the old school house they halted, and the story of whipping out the muster was triumphantly related.

When they reached the picnic ground, such a hurra of welcome as came from the Catamount Hill boys, one could hardly imagine, but it made the old hills ring, and the rocks their silence seemed to break, for "Uncle Bill’s" enthusiasm was fearfully contagious.

But to the programme first, reading of the 90th psalm from Mr. Benjamin Farley’s old family Bible; then prayer from one of the old time residents, after which "Coronation" was sung and the chronological history read by Dr. A.. Davenport (a copy of which appears in this paper).

Family histories were also read by Miss Emma Farley and Miss Nellie Ives beautifully worded and well worthy of print would space be allotted. "The Old Oaken Bucket" with appropriate remarks by Mr. David Cary were listened to with interest.

http://www.scituateh...tes_oakenbucket.html

Then too, the picnic part of the programme must not escape mention, which was basket in every sense of the word - a group here, another here, and so all around the rocks and ledges were seated, the happy families partaking of the good things brought to sustain the inner man.

And last, but not least, the miscellaneous, of which there is not room to speak in detail; reminiscences of bygone years.

"And jokes that cracked a bit (etc.)
One did, perchance,call forth the tears
The other shouts and cheers (etc.)"

Then there were notes from C.J. Davenport and Levi Davenport; poems from "Q in the Corner"; and "Mrs. M.D."; speeches from many, etc. too numerous to mention. In short, many appropriate and spicy things were said; one was "Once I was young, but now I am old; never have I seen a Catamounter forsaken or his seed begging bread". [Kind of ironic considering the murder that would take place there a week later]. Estimated number present, 700.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Astronomy, Boston (MA), Charity, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Education, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Food, History, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Jokes, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Murder, Music, Noise, Old Age, Parties, Religion, Trains, Women, Words, Berkshire County (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
South Deerfield

South Deerfield - The report of the fire, as given by the Springfield Republican on Mon., was anything but satisfactory to the "Law Abiding Citizens", their item in Tuesday's paper to the contrary notwithstanding. The insinuation that Mr.Mulligan allowed a set of roughs to come up on the train, who created "so much disturbance", the citizens do not believe.

On the contrary, we are requested to say that they are very grateful to Superintendent Mulligan and the company which came with him, for the very prompt manner in which they responded to the call for aid, notwithstanding they did not get here to render much aid, they did manifest a disposition, for which they have the hearty thanks of all Law Abiding Citizens". [Very blurry section follows]

Then the insinuation that the Irish were more drunken and disorderly than any other class is a mistake, perhaps not purposely. On the other hand there were many Irish [?] as they always have on such occasions in this place. As for the liquor flowing freely we will say nothing, as judging from the report we presume the said reporter knew better about that than the "Law Abiding Citizens" [more blurriness - sorry]. Law Abiding Citizen.
 

Subjects: Accidents, Criminals, Deerfield (MA), Drunkenness, Fires, Gangs, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Irish, Law and Lawyers, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Racism, Trains, Transportation


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