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Sep 25, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Libraries and Librarians

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 2, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Turners Falls

The Young Men's Christian Association is officered as follows: Mr. Whitney Jr., President; Casper March, Vice President; Rev. C.E. Seaver, Secretary; H.O. Streeter, Treasurer; Rev. J.C. Groth, Librarian; Rev. H.R. Howes, Assistant Librarian. A library will be opened to the public as soon as possible. All friends who desire to donate books or periodicals are kindly requested to give notice to the librarian of the association.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), Religion, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

James S. Grennell Esq. has for some months rented the front rooms on the third floor in the Franklin County Bank building, where he is collecting a very valuable library, [See an interesting article about this library in the New York Times online issue of March 7, 1915 under the name James S. Grinnell] consisting principally of books relating to both English and American patents, a more complete set than can be found elsewhere in New England. He is the possessor, also, of many rare and expensive books on agriculture. It is Mr. G's purpose at some time to take up his permanent residence in Greenfield, and establish a Patent Solicitor's office, his extensive experience in the patent office at Washington giving him unusual qualification for the business.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Economics, Emigration and Immigration, English (and England), Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Inventions, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Names, New England

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
Lightning

Lightning struck a Sunday school chapel at Allen's Corner, N.J. Sun., instantly killing Thomas Hewett, Librarian, and injuring several children, besides knocking down all the plastering and the chimney.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Children, Education, Libraries and Librarians, Lightning, Religion

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
Brief notes of a pleasant excursion

The Massachusetts Press Association left Boston on the morning of June 23, for their annual excursion. The party, including ladies, numbered almost 90...On this excursion two first class cars and a smoking car on the Boston & Albany road were devoted to the exclusive use of the excursionists...The sandwiches, cakes, etc. were neatly packed in pasteboard boxes for each individual, and were liberally accompanied with iced lemonade.

At Albany...there was a change to the fine cars of the New York Central Railroad, and we were soon steaming with almost lightning rapidity through the beautiful Mohawk Valley. The flat farm lands here are of an unsurpassing fertility. There does not appear to be an acre that is not under cultivation....The Mohawk runs parallel with the road for many miles, and on the opposite side of the river is the Erie Canal. The latter, which has been one of the great institutions of the Empire State for many years, appears to New Englanders to be a rather slow method of transportation. The canal boats, which we pass in quick succession, seem hardly to move, so snail like is the progress which they make, but what is lost in time is saved in expense. If it was not for the Erie our coal and grain would never approach the present low prices, and upon it has depended largely the wealth and development of the great Western States.

But...the day was fearfully hot, and our excursion cars were in the rear of a very large train; and the dust and cinders that poured into the windows soon blackened our faces, filled our eyes and ears, so that when we reached Syracuse about 8 o’clock in the eve., after a ride of 350 miles, we were a sad looking set, more like a band of miners from the coal region, than people who patronized soap and water. We were, however, nicely quartered at the Globe and Vanderbilt hotels and through the transforming influences of the bath, clean linen, and a good supper, were soon ourselves again.

The party left Syracuse soon after 6 the next morning, by the Auburn branch of the New York Central. At Auburn we got the chance to see the extensive buildings of the State Penitentiary, but did not stop for a close inspection of the establishment. A short ride brought us to the wharf at Cayuga, where we embarked on a small steamer for a delightful trip of 38 miles through Cayuga Lake...

With song and mirth the happy excursionists were soon on the top wave of enjoyment. At Goodwin’s Point a landing was made and the party visited Taghkanic Falls To reach the Falls we climbed a steep descent of a mile, under a broiling sun, and were hardly, when we reached the summit, in the most favorable mood to fully appreciate this wild freak of nature. These falls are on a small stream, and 215 ft. in perpendicular height, while the rocky gorge is nearly 400 ft. down.

It is a wild and picturesque spot, but at this season there is not a large flow of water over the fall. A hotel has been built upon the summit, within a stone’s throw of the fall, and it is quite a resort for excursionists and picnic parties.... Afterwards we landed at the beautiful town of Ithaca, at the head of the lake. the principal business here is apparently the transferment of coal. The coal is brought by rail from the mines in Pennsylvania and transshipped to the canal boats, which convey it across the lake and thence through the canal to the Eastern markets. Our quarters were at the Ithaca Hotel, a first class house...After a sumptuous dinner, carriages were provided for a visit to Cornell University.

The college buildings occupy a beautiful site overlooking the lake, and can be seen miles away...The college was opened in 1868, and everything about the premises is neat and new...The founder of the college, Ezra Cornell, Esq. endowed the institution with more than three millions of dollars...Our party assembled in the Library of the college, and were addressed by President White...It was the purpose of Mr. Cornell to found a university where any person could find instruction in any study, and well has his purpose been carried out. It recognizes no distinct religious belief, though its aim is to promote Christian civilization...

Upon the grounds an opportunity is afforded, as at our Agricultural College, for the practical study of agriculture. There is a carpenter shop, furnished with power and machinery, where students who have tastes in that direction can cultivate their skill in wood work. A large machine shop is fitted with lathes and a variety of machinery and tools, and we found here a dozen or more young men hard at work with sleeves rolled up, dressed in colored shirts an overalls, hands and faces begrimmed, just like "greasy mechanics".

Several valuable inventions have been made in this shop, and much of this work is put to a practical use. In the same building is a printing shop with a large assortment of type and presses...Cornell University recognizes the co-education of the sexes. Young ladies are admitted on the same footing as young men, and are advanced through the same studies...the young men, who at other colleges have been accustomed to practices that were vulgar and demoralizing have voluntarily given them up since the admission of the young ladies, and so far from the mingling of the sexes leading to unpleasant talk and scandal, as some had predicted, not a breath of suspicion of anything out of character had ever existed...

Before leaving the college grounds we were driven to Fall Creek Gorge a wild, romantic locality, where the waters of a small stream leap and splash over the rocks of a wild ravine in its mad course to the lake below. We left Ithaca at 7 in the eve. over the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad, the President of which is Gen. W.I. Burt, the Postmaster of Boston. General Burt had accompanied our party, and we were indebted to his kind attention and influence for many courtesies. On this road we pass through Elmira, and about 10 o’clock at night, in the midst of a drenching rain, arrived at the town of Watkins at the head of Seneca Lake. After a little confusion we were provided with carriages and driven through the pitchlike darkness up the steep ascent to the Glen Mountain House [See the NYPL Digital Gallery for great photos], which has been erected above the famous Watkins Glen.

There is no natural wonder on the American continent, with the exception perhaps, of Niagara Falls, that surpasses the Glen...Says Bayard Taylor: "In all my travels I have never met with scenery more beautiful and romantic than that embraced in this wonderful Glen, and the most remarkable thing of all is that so much magnificence and grandeur should be found in a region where there are no ranges of mountains...It is only since 1869 that the Glen has been accessible to the public...[A very large section follows about the Glen and its hotels. To be continued next week].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Beverages, Boston (MA), Canals, Clubs, Coal, Cosmetics, Curiosities and Wonders, Economics, Education, Eye, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Greenfield (MA), Horses, Hotels, Ice, Inventions, Libraries and Librarians, Lightning, Mail, Massachusetts, Mines and Mineral Resources, Natural Resources

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 14, 1875
Deerfield

The old Ware store and lot which has been in the Ware family for more than 70 years, has recently been purchased by George Sheldon for the purpose of securing an eligible site for a Memorial Hall for the P.V.M. Association. This store stands upon a spot of high historical interest. It is located on the south east corner of the home lot granted Rev. John Williams, the first minister of Deerfield, by the town in 1686. On this spot he was living on the memorable 20th of Feb. of 1704, whence he and the surviving members of his family were dragged into a terrible captivity. His house, which was burned, stood about 6 rods in the rear of the store, the common being at that date 20 rods wide.

/ Major Elijah Williams, son of Mr. Williams, succeeded his father in the possession of the homestead, and from 1740 until his death, he kept a store on this spot. During the French and Indian wars, he was commissary for the military forces of this region, and from this store most of the scouting parties of the Upper Conn. Valley were fitted out, as well as the troops that marched to the front in the Canada campaign. On the death of Major Williams, the property passed to his son John, "Esquire John" as he was usually called. He continued in trade here with his sister and other partners until about 1802, when he sold the store to Orlando Ware, having previously sold the rest of the house and rest of the lot to Thomas Dickinson or his son Consider.

/ The Registry of Deeds for the northern Hampshire district was in this building as early as 1791. Esq. John, George Ephraim Hoyt and Elijah Williams (Uncle Josh) were successively Registers of Deeds here. Esq. John administered justice. And here were several lawyers' offices, and the social library was kept here many years. It is to be hoped a complete history of this spot will be given by the President of the P.V.M. Association, who is now occupied in selling off the stock in the store, preparatory to the transfer of the property to the Antiques.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Family, Fires, French, Government, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, History, Households, Law and Lawyers, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Museums, Names, Native Americans, Obituaries, Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Assn, Religion, Stores, Retail, Vendors and Purchasers, War / Weaponry, Work, Canada

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 7, 1875
Turners Falls

The Turners Falls Library Association opened their library rooms for the distribution of books for the first time Sat. eve. the 29th.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 31, 1875
News about town: Greenfield items

The following list of new books has been recently added to the Greenfield Library: Scottish Song; We and Our Neighbors [by Harriet Beecher Stowe]; Mr. Smith; The Wreck of the Chancellor [by Jules Verne]; Egypt and Iceland; A Winter in Russia; Characteristics from the Writings of J.H. Newman; Theology in the English Poets; Politics for Young Americans; English portraits; Social Life in Greece; The Starling; David Crockett; Invasion of the Crimea, 34 vols.; Strength and Beauty; Outlines of the World’s History; Mistress Judith [by Christina Catherine Liddell]; Gunnar, a Tale of Norse Life; Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations; Annual Record of Science and Industry; Shakespeare Commentaries; The New Hyperion; Manual of Political Ethics; Ismailia, by S.W. Baker; Ancient Law; St. Nicholas.
 

Subjects: Disasters, Education, English (and England), Greenfield (MA), History, Law and Lawyers, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Poetry, Politics, Religion, Science, Transportation, War / Weaponry, Scots and Scotland, Arabs, Geography, Russia

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
Photographs recently prepared from likenesses of Mary Lyon

Photographs recently prepared from likenesses of Mary Lyon, which were taken, one during her life in Ipswich, and others later, can be obtained from S.E. Eastman, South Hadley. There are also many excellent stereoscopic pictures of Mount Holyoke Seminary and grounds, including several views of the interior of the library, seminary, hall and gymnasium. Any of the above will be sent by mail at 25 cents apiece.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Education, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Libraries and Librarians, Mail, Photographs, Sports, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 3, 1875
Erving

A recent "bean supper" in behalf of the library association netted $25.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Economics, Erving (MA), Food, Libraries and Librarians

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 26, 1875
Shelburne Falls

H.O. Smith has been chosen life Trustee of the Arms' Library Association.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 26, 1875
Bernardston

Mrs. A.R. Cushman has been reappointed librarian of the Cushman library.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Names, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 19, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

It is proposed to have the next "spell" for the benefit of the Greenfield Library Association. Arrangements are not fully made, but the spelling between sides will be in the old fashioned way. That is, when a word is mis-spelled on one side and then corrected on the other, the leader of the latter will be allowed to choose a speller from the former, and so the contest can be kept up until one or the other is extinguished. The match will be held next Thurs. eve.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Contests, Greenfield (MA), Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Spelling, Words

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 5, 1875
Turners Falls

A meeting of the Library Association was held Sat. eve., at which it was voted to expend a sum not to exceed $500 in the purchase of books, and Messrs. R.N. Oakman, W.D. Russell and Nathaniel Gilmore were appointed a committee to make a selection of books, which was made and presented at a meeting on Tues. eve. It was voted to hire a room in Colle Block for a library room, and W.D. Russell was appointed a committee to carry into effect the vote of the association. The library will probably be opened in a few weeks (Reporter).
 

Subjects: Clubs, Economics, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 5, 1875
North Leverett

The young people of North Leverett will hold a public entertainment in the church Thurs. eve. at 7 o'clock, consisting of dialogues, tableaux, songs, etc., after which warm sugar will be served in the hall [Yumm!]. The object is to raise money for the Sunday School library.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Children, Economics, Food, Leverett (MA), Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Parties, Religion

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 29, 1875
Coleraine

A circulating library has been started with E.S. Weston, President, O.B. Curtis, Vice President, J.E. Winchester, Secretary, D.A. Strong, Treasurer, H.A. Smith, Librarian, H.A. Howard, E.S. Weston, D.A. Strong, Committee on Books, L. Griswold, A.A. Smith, A.H. Temple, Committee on Bylaws.
 

Subjects: Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Law and Lawyers, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 29, 1875
The full length statue of plaster of Daniel Webster http://www

The full length statue of plaster of Daniel Webster , presented by the eminent sculptor Thomas Ball, and which for a long time stood in the Merchant's exchange at Boston, has been set up in the college library at Dartmouth college.
 

Subjects: Art, Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Education, Libraries and Librarians, New Hampshire, Statues, Vendors and Purchasers

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 29, 1875
A colony of Communists

In 1842 a society of German Communists settled near Buffalo, N.Y., and after remaining there awhile removed to a point 74 miles west of Davenport, Iowa. They call themselves the "Congregations of True Inspiration" and from the name of their principal village they are known as the Amana Community...Their head is a woman, who is supposed to speak by direct inspiration of God...The men, women and children eat separately. "Why do you separate men from women at table?" asked the correspondent. "To prevent silly conversation and trifling conduct" was the answer. Each branch of business has its foreman. The children go to school from the age of 6 till they are 13. Their studies are alternated with knitting. Boys as well as girls are required to knit.

/ The women work hard and dress soberly. All ornaments are forbidden. To wear the hair loose is prohibited. Great care is used to keep the sexes apart. On Sun. aft. the boys are permitted to walk in the fields, and so are the girls but they must go in different directions. No young man is allowed to marry until he is 24 and matrimony is not regarded as meritorious. Each adult male is allowed from $40 to $100 a year for clothing; each woman from $25 to $30, and each child from $5 to $10. They have no library and most of their reading is in the Bible, and in their own books. They take no interest in politics and do not vote.

/ They employ about 200 hired hands, all Germans. They are excellent farmers, and keep the cattle. The members do not work hard. They say that 3 hired men will do as much as 5 or 6 of the members. They make woolen cloth enough for their own wants and supply the country about them...They have no debt and have considerable money at interest. In sickness they practice homeopathy. (See "Amana: the community of true inspiration" on Google Books).
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Barber / Hair, Business Enterprises, Children, Cults, Diseases, Economics, Education, Elections, Emigration and Immigration, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Furniture, Germans, History, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Masculinity (Machismo), Names, Politics, Religion, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 29, 1875
Orange

New catalogues and cards have been procured, and our library will soon reopen.
 

Subjects: Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Orange (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, March 15, 1875
Turners Falls

The dog fund, amounting to $210, has been turned over to the Library Association. It would be an excellent idea to have a reading room...open several evenings per week.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Clubs, Economics, Government, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Wed, Sep 6, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 22, 1875
(Turners Falls) The first donation to the Public Library Association was made by the Hon. Wendell T. Davis of Greenfield, and consists of some 20 bound volumes.

(Turners Falls) The first donation to the Public Library Association was made by the Hon. Wendell T. Davis of Greenfield, and consists of some 20 bound volumes.
 

Subjects: Charity, Clubs, Greenfield (MA), Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Thu, Aug 31, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 22, 1875
(Turners Falls) At a meeting of the directors of the Turners Falls Library Association, W.H.B. Gilmore was chosen Librarian, and George O. Peabody, W.H.P. Gilmore, C.M. Barnett, Rev. E.A. Wyman and B

(Turners Falls) At a meeting of the directors of the Turners Falls Library Association, W.H.B. Gilmore was chosen Librarian, and George O. Peabody, W.H.P. Gilmore, C.M. Barnett, Rev. E.A. Wyman and B.W. Mayo, a committee to solicit subscriptions.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Economics, Libraries and Librarians, Montague (MA), Religion, Turners Falls (MA), Work

Posted by stew - Thu, Aug 31, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 22, 1875
(Orange) An entertainment will be given at the town hall Tues. eve. for the benefit of the library, the proceeds to be applied to the purchase of new books.

(Orange) An entertainment will be given at the town hall Tues. eve. for the benefit of the library, the proceeds to be applied to the purchase of new books.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Government, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Orange (MA), Vendors and Purchasers

Posted by stew - Sun, Aug 27, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 22, 1875
(Deerfield) The Grange dedicated their new hall on Tues. eve., delegations being present from Greenfield, South Deerfield and other places. The building was formerly the public school house, and has

(Deerfield) The Grange dedicated their new hall on Tues. eve., delegations being present from Greenfield, South Deerfield and other places. The building was formerly the public school house, and has been fitted up for its present uses at an outlay of $1150. The lower floor is occupied by the post office, public library and a store, and the second story comprises a hall, [20?] x 33 ft., and two rooms separated from it by folding doors, so that in case of need nearly 200 people can be seated, while one of the rooms is fitted up with a stove, cooking conveniences, etc. An audience of osme 150 of the chosen, came to the dedicatory services, the principal item of which was the address of Prof. Stockbridge of Amherst. His theme was the position occupied by the farmers, particularly as related to the manufacturing classes. A generous collation was served at the close, with after speeches by D.O. Fisk and Mr. Carpenter of Shelburne, A.K. Warner of Greenfield, Dexter Thayer of Deerfield and others.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Education, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Households, Libraries and Librarians, Mail, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Stores, Retail, Architecture / Construction, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Tue, Jul 11, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 15, 1875
(Warwick) Mrs. Mary Blake Clapp of Dorchester died on Sunday. She was born in Warwick and was a daughter of the late [?] Johnathan Blake, and sister of the late Hon. Jonathan Blake. She was also sist

(Warwick) Mrs. Mary Blake Clapp of Dorchester died on Sunday. She was born in Warwick and was a daughter of the late [?] Johnathan Blake, and sister of the late Hon. Jonathan Blake. She was also sister of Mrs. Sarah Leonard, the only surviving member of the family, who is 97 years old the 16th day of the present month. Mrs. Clapp has distinguished herself by her acts of benvolence towards the people of her native town. The day she was 80 years old, she gave to the Unitarian Society $1000. Since she has given them $1000 more. She has given $1000 to the town for the care and repairs of the cemetery. Also a large number of volumes of books to the town library.
 

Subjects: Births, Cemeteries, Charity, Economics, Family, Government, Libraries and Librarians, Literature / Web Pages, Obituaries, Old Age, Religion, Rich People, Warwick (MA), Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Jun 18, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 8, 1875
(Shelburne Falls) R.S. Streeter has been chosen Treasurer of the Arms Library in place of S.T. Field.

(Shelburne Falls) R.S. Streeter has been chosen Treasurer of the Arms Library in place of S.T. Field.
 

Subjects: Economics, Libraries and Librarians, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)


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