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Apr 13, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Fairs

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
John Chinaman in New York

John Chinaman in New York - The New York Tribune describes the haunts of the Chinese in that city as follows:

In the Sixth Ward is a small district where most of the Chinese in New York live. A visitor to their opium smoking dens may go to Baxter Street, just below Franklin, where was formerly Donovan’s lane, the resort of the most desperate villains in the city, but which is now a Y-shaped court shut in on all sides by high tenement houses.

On the ground floor of one of these buildings is the establishment of "Old John", a Chinaman 74 years old, who has been in the United States 47 years, and was the first of his race to become naturalized. His quarters comprise three rooms. By the door is seated his assistant, who gives out the drug. Upon one side of the room is a low platform or dais; sometimes there are two, one above the other, like births upon which men are to be seen reclining in the different stages of opium intoxication. [How interesting - guess that’s where the word ’berths’ comes from].

The pipes consist of a bamboo stem and a porcelain bowl about 2 inches in diameter, in the centre [sic] of which is a small receptacle for the opium. A small piece of the drug is taken up on an iron rod and heated until it is dried to a proper consistency. Then it is inserted into the pipe, and the smoker slowly draws the smoke through, soon filling the whole room with a peculiar smell.

The proprietor furnishes his customers with pipes and a place to lie down. The drug is weighed out upon a rude pair of reed scales. The weight used is a silver coin. Each smoker is provided with a small horn box, which will contain about 15 cents’ worth of opium, enough to last an average smoker all night. The preparation is undoubtedly adulterated, since it costs the druggist $23.50 a pound.

A few doors below, on the same side, is another place where smoking is carried on, which does not differ materailly from Old John’s. There is, however, a temple connected with it. On the wall is hung a gayly [sic] painted picture of some Chinese god, at whose shoulder, on one side, man’s good angel is represented, and on the other, his evil angel.

The faces are very grotesque, and resemble those painted upon tea chests. Hanging upon the picture are numerous tinsel and paper flowers, with faces painted upon the petals, and a little below the picture is a shrine upon which stand two candles, to be lighted only upon festival occasions.

In the middle is a dish containing sand, in which are the burned fragments of several joss sticks. The pious Celestial lights one of these, and placing it in the sand on the altar prays to his deity. From the ceiling hangs two Chinese lanterns, and there is also a glass vessel containing some kind of vegetable oil in which floats a burning wick.

A cup of the same oil is placed in the shrine for the especial use of the god. Upon the wall are hung bulletin boards where the news which agitates the Chinese world is pasted. A curious scroll, resembling the red cover on a pack of fire crackers, attracts attention and proves to be a directory of business of the principal Chinese merchants in San Francisco.
 

Subjects: Art, Beverages, Births, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Chinese, Criminals, Drug Abuse, Drugstores / Drugs, Economics, Emigration and Immigration, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Furniture, Glass / Windows, Households, Light, Literature / Web Pages, Names, Old Age, Racism, Religion, Roads, Smoking and Tobacco

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Centennial bell



The Troy Times has the following description of the new bell which is to be cast for Independence Hall, Philadelphia:

Meneely & Kimberley of this city, who are making a bell of 13,000 pounds for the tower of Old Independence Hall in Philadelphia...have received permission to select several cannon from those now in store at the W[?] Arsenal, to be cast in the bell. [A short article follows].
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Fairs, Heritage Activities, History, Literature / Web Pages, War / Weaponry, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

Commodore Perry's flagship, sunk in Erie Harbor 62 years ago, was raised Monday. She is to be exhibited at the Centennial Exposition.

[See the Wikipedia article on Oliver Hazard Perry]


 

Subjects: Archaeology, Fairs, History, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Transportation, War / Weaponry, Water

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Greenfield end of the Troy and Greenfield Railroad

The Greenfield end of the Troy and Greenfield Railroad - Messrs. Keith and Barton, Greenfield’s committee to adjust damages with parties on the line of the railroad, have been busy the past week, and have not yet completed their task. Starting from the track of the Connecticut River Railroad, a strip is taken from the Agricultural Fair Ground, the width of which is not yet determined.

A small portion of Mrs. Colle’s lot will probably be taken, and a little from the south side of John Osterhout’s lot and also Judge Aiken’s. A corner is taken from the Catholic premises, but the road will not come within 20 ft. of the new house, or seriously interfere with it. A small piece will be taken from the rear of Miss Lucy Billings’ lot, and the road will then cross lands belonging to the Methodist Society, H.J. Davis, A. DeWolf, L.T. Smith, Mrs. L.W. Rice, John Russell, and William Elliot, running for the most part on a side hill, and not greatly damaging any of the parties.

On E.J. Jones’ premises, it takes a part of his garden; on Dennis W. Jones, a rear lot; a strip of 50 rods, belonging to Charles L. Lowell; a strip fro the open lot adjoining, belonging to Joel Wilson, and also the premises in the rear of it belonging to ____ Merzh. Crossing the avenue, Mrs. Helen M. Pratt’s house stands directly in the way, and her whole lot is purchased. Mrs. Mary B. Coombs owns the remainder of the land to the Green River.

On the other side of Green River, the road will run 400 ft. south of James Newton’s hosue. At this point there will be a fill of 30 ft., which will require an embankment 16 rods wide at the bottom. The distance across the Newton premises is 1800 ft. It strikes the east side of J.M. Munson’s lot, not going within 25 rods of his house, taking from him 5 acres of pine land running through a cut of 33 ft. on the extreme south as it comes to the Deerfield line.

The length of the road on Munson’s land is 78 rods. The line of road is about half way between the old trotting park on Petty’s Plain and the County road west of it, crossing land belonging to the Bird heirs, a small corner of land belonging to Allen Newton, George W. Potter and Washington Jones, then lands of Caleb Jones, George W. Jones, ____ Hartwell, L.B. Wise, Elexis Jones, Charles Wood, Frederick Conant, and then on to the line at West Deerfield.

At Blakeley Hollow, the bed of the road is 23 ft. under the present track, and from that point west, runs on the side hill, a succession of cuts and fills, but nowhere interferes with houses west of Green River. The bridge across Green River is to be a two track iron bridge, 500 ft. long and 80 ft. high. The piers and abutments will have to rest on piles, as an iron rod has been sunk near the river, to the depth of 40 ft., and the ground was found to be soft and treacherous.

The bridge is to be of the first things constructed, and will be sub-contracted to one of the parties who are now making estimates.
 

Subjects: Bridges, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Horses, Households, Parks, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Trains, Trees, Vendors and Purchasers, Women, Work, Architecture / Construction, Geography

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The amusement committee of the Agricultural Society have about decided to have the balloon ascension on the last day of the Fair, provided that Greenfield merchants, and others who will be benefited by the influx of people attracted by the sight, will "chip in" to help pay the expense.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Astronomy, Clubs, Economics, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Vendors and Purchasers, Words

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 16, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

We are frequently asked if the work upon the new railroad will not prevent the use of the Agricultural Society's grounds at the coming Fair? As the contracts for building the road are not yet awarded, and the exact location through the grounds not decided upon, it is in no way likely that there will be anything to interfere with our usual exhibition.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Trains, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Premium list

Premium list for the 5th annual cattle show and fair at Charlemont, Mass., Sept. 23 and 24, 1875. [Very long article].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Contests, Fairs

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
The Band Convention at Lake Pleasant

The great Band gathering at Lake Pleasant on Fri. attracted an immense crowd of people, one of the largest ever assembled there. Between 75 and 80 car loads of human beings disembarked from the trains, coming from nearly every town within a radius of 40 miles. Best judges estimated the no. of people at about ten thousand [!], which is about as many as should be packed together in one locality, if convenience and comfort are to be consulted.

[Believe me, this estimate is much too large!]

There was the usual delay and confusion incident to transporting so many people over the railroad, and it was nearly noon when the 18 bands were on the ground ready for business. The three hundred or more musicians were finally massed, the instruments of each class being placed together. But the concert was hardly satisfactory. Though each band had drilled upon the music selected, placing them together for the first time without any rehearsal was a mistake.

But there was another obstacle to the success of the concert for which the bands were in no was responsible. About 1/2 of the programme was omitted, and the leaders drew lots to decide the order of playing of each from the band stand. The following was the order settled upon and the names of the leaders of each band: Fitchburg, Russell; Mechanics of Orange, Ned Clapp; Haydenville, Henry Smith; Florence, David Shields; South Deerfield, James Clapp; Bernardston, N.S. Cutler; Monson, A.D. Norcross; Greenfield, Samuel Squier; Gardner Serenade, ___; Millers Falls, Henry Colburn; East Templeton, ____; Easthampton, James Smith; Montague City, Fred Bridges; Northampton, A.J. Frank; Southampton, L,L, Walcott; Amherst, E.B. Fitts; Emmett of Turners Falls, Donahue; Westfield, ____.

This portion of the treat was very creditable to the bands of the association, and went far to make amends for any shortcomings of the opening concert. The pieces played by the Fitchburg, Haydenville, Florence, Orange, Greenfield, Bernardston, South Deerfield and perhaps one or two others, were exceedingly fine and enlisted hearty applause from the spectators. The Gardner serenade, which numbered only 6 pieces, attracted a good deal of attention by its excellent playing, and there was not a failure or a poor performance by any.

These selected pieces by the different bands made up a varied programme which continued through the afternoon. The audience filled every available seat in the great amphitheater, and many took a better cushioned place of rest upon the ground, while a vast throng surged about, tramping up hill and down, filling the paths of the grove, or the walks upon the shore of the lake. A number of boats and barges were constantly filled and moving over the Lake, and everybody was disposed to make the most of the day and be happy.

We should not have said everybody, because there were hundreds who got hot and disgusted before they had been on the ground half an hour, and seated themselves in the cars left on the side track, and there waited hour after hour for the time of their departure, fretting and stewing and wishing they had staid [sic] at home; but who will be just as ready to be on hand another year. Hayner’s full orchestra furnished music for the dancers in the pavilion; the day wore away, as such occasions do, and people crowded down upon the track and hustled and jostled to get aboard the cars as the different trains were made up.

The throng, for such a large one, was very orderly. There were a few cases of drunkenness, and one man had his horse stolen, but the police officers found little occasion for their service. The bands will realize a very handsome thing from their share of the day’s profits, and we trust will keep up their organization, giving us a Centennial Festival of this kind next year. Much credit is due Vice President Day and Secretary Squier of Greenfield for the day’s success.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Bernardston (MA), Clubs, Crime, Dance, Deerfield (MA), Drunkenness, Economics, Fairs, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Heritage Activities, Horses, Lake Pleasant (MA), Massachusetts, Millers Falls (MA), Montague (MA), Music, Names, Orange (MA), Police, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Robbers and Outlaws

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
The English are the first

The English is [i.e. are] the first of foreign nations to break ground at Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, for the erection of the buildings for the use of their commissioners during the centennial. Japan, Sweden and Morocco are preparing to follow suit, and the other commissions will soon be similarly engaged, the whole making a lively and very picturesque scene. Austria’s requisition for space, which has just been received, calls for 32,000 square feet of the main building and over 21,000 in the art gallery, an increase of 1/3 over the original reservation for that nation. [See Centennial Exhibition in Wikipedia].


 

Subjects: Amusements, English (and England), Fairs, Heritage Activities, History, Japanese, Literature / Web Pages, Parks, Arabs, Europe, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Premium list

For the 26th annual Cattle Show and Fair at Greenfield, Mass., Thurs. and Fri., Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, 1875. [Four entire columns of names and prizes].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Contests, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Names

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 14, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Shelburne

We are glad to hear that the new location of the Troy & Greenfield Railroad at the county seat is not going to destroy the Agricultural Grounds, of which our people think so much, and which appears to be under the special protection of Providence, as well as Greenfield. Let all take notice.
 

Subjects: Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Luck, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Trains

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 14, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The committee to provide amusements for our coming fair have before them a proposition from James Allen, an aeronaut of Providence, R.I., to make a balloon ascension, using a balloon containing 35,000 cubic feet of gas, and capable of taking up 3 persons. His price is $200; that of the Kings last year, was $300. there is no doubt but it would be a good investment for the society, as there is nothing else that will draw out so many people, and the proposition is likely to be favorably entertained.

[Read about James Allen in Wikipedia's "Union Army Balloon Corps"].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Astronomy, Economics, Fairs, Greenfield (MA), Literature / Web Pages, War / Weaponry, Stunt performers

Posted by stew - Fri, Dec 12, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Hawley

On Fri. July 9, a person traveling up Hawley road, in the vicinity of Mr. Mansfield, might have seen parties of 2, 3, and 5, stealing along behind bushes and fences in a very suspicious manner, each one bearing baskets or pails carefully covered. When all these groups of wayfarers had gathered under the trees above the brook they started for the house to take Mrs. Mansfield by storm. Mrs. Mansfield was born in Middleborough, Mass. July 9, 1788, so this was her 87th birthday, and her friends and neighbors had gathered to celebrate the event.

The dear old lady was taken completely by surprise. After the usual congratulations had been made and the people were comfortably seated in the parlor, Mrs. Mansfield began to relate some of her youthful experiences. She told of daring feats of horsemanship and hairbreadth escapes in dealing with fiery steeds. Mrs. Mansfield's guests then presented their birthday gifts. There were aprons, ties and bows, a dress and collar, oranges, lemons and figs, a bottle of blackberry wine, a bountiful supply of snuff, a book mark, and most noticeable of all, a large pincushion with a set of pins in the center and stars in the corners. I know not whether the maker intended the stars to have any particular significance or not, but they reminded me of the promise: "They that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament; and they that turn many to righteousness as the stars forever and ever".

Mrs. Mansfield has been a communicant of the church for half a century, and has led a most lovely and consistent Christian life. Towards the end of the afternoon tables were set under the trees, but a shower coming up they were removed to the spacious dining room. The tables were loaded with an abundance of choice viands that kind friends had provided. The aged couple sat at the center of the long table, under a floral arch made by their grand-daughter, Miss Essie Sears.

Just before tea was announced, Dr. Trow of Buckland and a friend of his drove up, and by their presence added to the pleasure of the occasion. Over 40 persons partook in the feast. Dr. Trow made an eloquent speech, which, I regret to say, I am unable to repeat. He called to mind the many changes that the venerable couple had witnessed in the long life that God had allotted to them, and speaking of all the friends and companions of their youth having passed away, compared their present state to that of the few solitary trees scattered over the mountain side beyond the Charlemont fair grounds, where formerly a forest had stood [and stands again]. http://www.charlemon...SCHFairgrounds.shtml W.E. Mansfield then gracefully thanked the company in his parent's behalf. One of the no. present read the following: "Lines to a dear friend on her 87th birthday"...Quizzie.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Astronomy, Beverages, Births, Buckland (MA), Charlemont (MA), Fairs, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Furniture, Horses, Households, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Old Age, Parties, Poetry, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Smoking and Tobacco

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 8, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
News of the week

The Philadelphia Centennial people are counting on 10,000,000 visitors next year, at 50 cents a head, and they argue if they can get $5,000,000 from visitors they can return the money paid in for stock. They think that ten million 50 cent pieces http://www.carsoncitymorgans.com/ANACS.html is a moderate estimate of the gate money.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Economics, Fairs, Heritage Activities

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 6, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
The Charlemont celebration

There was a very fair attendance at the celebration under the auspices of the Deerfield Agricultural Society on the grounds in Charlemont on Fri. The horse trotting, the main feature of the day was commenced about 11 o’clock. In the 2:50 class the prize offered was $75 - $40 for the 1st prize, $25 for the 2nd, and $10 for the 3rd. The race was won by F.S. Hagar’s "Tommy Dot"; C. Coullard’s "Kate Henry" came in second, Smith’s "Kitty Rude" third...An excellent dinner was served, and a fine address was given by Prof. Stockbridge of the Agricultural College. Among the other speakers was Dr. Trow of Buckland...[See much more about Dr. Trow in Google Books in ""History of the Connecticut Valley in Massachusetts, with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers""].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Art, Buckland (MA), Charlemont (MA), Clubs, Contests, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Education, Fairs, Food, History, Horses, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Names, Words

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 4, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The well known trotting horse "Rockingham", more recently called "Seed-Leaf", belonging to E.J. Everett of Deerfield, dropped dead while trotting on the track on Petty's Plain last Thurs. F.S. Hagar was driving the horse, which he was training for the Charlemont trot on Fri., and the animal was going at a .35 pace when it fell dead without an instant's warning. The horse had a record of about 2.32 several years ago, and was valued at six or eight hundred dollars.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Contests, Economics, Fairs, Greenfield (MA), Horses, Names, Obituaries, Sports

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 21, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The Ladies' Strawberry Festival of the Second Congregational Society came off Thurs. eve., and was well gotten up but thinly attended. The refreshments were abundant and excellent and the side exhibitions varied and good. In addition to the fish pond, which appeared well stocked and was well patronized until dried herring made their appearance, there was a table of beautiful fancy articles made by the young girls of the society; the post office; a beautiful table of flowers; the guess cake and guess beans; the fortune teller; while Punch and Judy, with new attractions gave 4 exhibitions. There was a table set with old fashioned table furniture, with its pot of baked beans, Indian bread, dough nuts [i.e. doughnuts], etc. The guess cake was taken by Mrs. H.W. Clapp and George Averill, and the guess gold lined silver cup by Mrs. J.C. Bangs. Proceeds about $135.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Children, Clubs, Contests, Economics, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Furniture, Greenfield (MA), History, Mail, Native Americans, Prophecies, Religion, Women, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 21, 1875
Millers Falls

The Strawberry Festival of the Congregational society Tues. eve. was a very successful one. The net receipts were about $75. Quite a large delegation was present from Greenfield. The Millers Falls Band furnished the music.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Economics, Fairs, Food, Greenfield (MA), Millers Falls (MA), Montague (MA), Music, Religion

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 14, 1875
Buckland

The citizens of Buckland and vicinity had their annual sugar eat on Tues., on the hill on Homer W. Dodge's farm. The Shelburne Falls Band was in attendance. Graham K. Ward acted as chairman, and on taking the chair, gave those present a hearty welcome. The hill on which the festival was held, was given the jaw breaking name of "Koon-Chang" [I don't know; comes out Thai any way I search it] and remarks were made on the occasion by G.D. Crittenden, Lorenzo Richmond and others; a poem written by Mrs. Dexter Atkins was read. The dancing was under the charge of Walter R. Smith as floor manager, and H.B. Fellows as prompter. Those present had a very pleasant time.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Buckland (MA), Dance, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Names, Poetry, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 14, 1875
Turners Falls

The ladies of the M.E. church in this place kindly invite the public to their strawberry festival next Wed., June 16th. They hope to make it a profitable and successful occasion in every good sense.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Economics, Fairs, Food, Montague (MA), Turners Falls (MA), Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 14, 1875
News of the week

Beecher has just received as a gift from the ladies of the recent homeopathic fair an umbrella stand of gilt wood, two umbrellas and a cane, the sticks being of malacca, gold-headed, and the silk of the best English make. It was awarded him by vote as the most popular clergyman, his principal rival being Cardinal McCloskey .
 

Subjects: Contests, Elections, English (and England), Fairs, Medical Personnel, Religion, Scandals, Trees, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 24, 1875
News of the week

A nugget of copper, 28 per cent pure ore, weighing 6000 pounds, is on exhibit at St. Louis. It came from the Lake Superior region, where it was taken from an ancient digging. The mass, when found, had evidently been detached from its bed by ancient miners, whose stone hammers, in great numbers, were found in the mine. . [See Google Books "The Science record", 1876, p. 65, for more particulars on this boulder].
 

Subjects: Archaeology, Curiosities and Wonders, Fairs, History, Literature / Web Pages, Lost and Found, Mines and Mineral Resources, Native Americans, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Science

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Should the Troy & Greenfield railroad be changed in location, so as to come into our village over the old Edwards' survey, as it now looks very much as though it would, it will settle the question of moving the agricultural ground, and the society will have to be looking out for a new location.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Trains

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
News of the week

Jeff Davis delivered the annual address of the Houston (Tex.) State Fair Tues.
 

Subjects: Fairs, Literature / Web Pages, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
Shelburne Falls

On Sat. the 22nd, Kate Henry is to trot a match with E. Smith's horse on the fairground at Charlemont. Considerable money is staked on the result.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Contests, Economics, Fairs, Horses, Names, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Women


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