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Nov 27, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: African-Americans / Blacks

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The first colored Senator Reverend H.R. Revels



The first colored Senator Reverend H.R. Revels [Hiram R. Revels] - A correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial writes from Holly Springs, Mississippi, as follows concerning ex-Senator Revels, now a Methodist minister near there: "When we entered the door of the plain white frame meeting house, it was filled with worshipers. The Pastor is held in high esteem by his flock at home.

He is both law maker and shepard [i.e. shepherd], statesman and preacher. His party has put an "Hon." [Honorable] before his name, and a college of his church has put a "D.D." [Doctor of Divinity" behind it. He cane home from Washington City as pure as he went,which cannot be said of every white Senator [or ANY Senator these days]...



Pastor Revels is a man of about 30, rather below medium height, with wide perceptive faculties, and a face remarkably bland and winning. He is a light mulatto,with eyes tinged with blue. He is comely, graceful and dignified, and in manner as polite as Chesterfield, without the least affectation.

His voice is strong and rich of accordant tones, his modulation distinct, his sentences models of compact English. You can almost see his punctuation points as he speaks, so exactly measured and as symmetrical as his diction. His gestures are mostly with the forearm, hand and finger, as if he would paint on canvas every shade of his meaning, and touch delicately every color of flower in his rhetoric.

There is no bombast, no trick of syllable or scare of sound. He just talks to you right out in an earnest, straightforward way, and you are arrested, interested, affected and helped by what he says. All this from a farm chattel - a United States Senator, a self-made man.

But he is far in advance of his race. He is a pioneer. Well might his colored substitute in the pulpit, a preacher black as ebony, referring to Pastor Revels in his public prayer, beseech blessings upon the head of "de old, leader of the army". We "heard a white amen to that. And he has an army of a congregation!"

It is much above the average in intelligence, and the order and attention excellent. The Pastor’s influence over the people is marvelous. He can sway a thousand people by a gesture or a word. He said to us that strange as certain demonstrations might seem, it was paradise in order and sweetness to what it had been in former days.


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Art, Education, Eye, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Noise, Politics, Racism, Religion, Scandals, War / Weaponry, Words, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Conway

Conway - We saw an item 2 or 3 weeks since in the "Courier" speaking of a sudden death while swearing, reported by another paper as occurring at Burkeville, etc., contradicted by a correspondent, the item belonging to Burkville, Kentucky, not Conway, Mass. Perhaps there are but few living in our town who know that such an incident really did occur in our midst many years ago, living witnesses attesting the truth at the present time, called to remembrance by the item mentioned.

The facts were these, as nearly as I could gather them: a colored man by the name of James Hall, living or standing near the house now occupied by Russell Bond, was swearing fearfully, blaspheming the name of God because there had been a religious interest in the place and his wife was converted.

Wishing to join the church, she applied for baptism - we think for the Baptist Church here - and was accepted. Her husband’s anger was roused, and while terrible oaths were on his lips, swearing that the rite should not be administered to her, he fell forward dead!

"God fearing" may be our community, as a class both then and now, but is it not rather the mercy of Heaven that spares the swearer from alike state? It is not OUR goodness which keeps men alive, not even in Christian Conway!

[There actually is a Burkesville, Kentucky - see Wikipedia].


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Conway (MA), Households, Jokes, Literature / Web Pages, Names, Obituaries, Religion, Women, Words, Superstition

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

William Knapp, aged 90, died at Newburyport on Sun. He was one of the first abolitionists and the brother of Isaac Knapp, the original partner of Garrison in the Liberator. He was one of the oldest Freemasons in the State, and was Master of a Lodge 60 years ago.

[See the Internet Archive's full text of "History of Newburyport, Mass., 1764-1905].
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Clubs, Family, Freemasonry, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Obituaries, Old Age

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 13, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Mississippi Riot



Long article about race, Republicans and Reconstruction. See Clinton, Mississippi in Wikipedia.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Politics, Racism, Riots

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
6 executions at once



6 executions at once - 6 murderers, all young in years but old in crime, were hung on one gallows at Fort Smith, Arkansas Fri. These are their names: James H. Moore, Daniel H. Evans, John Whittington, white; Edward Campbell, colored; Samuel W. Favey, one quarter Cherokee, and Smoker Moonkiller, full blood Cherokee. Eight were originally sentenced, but one was killed while trying to escape, and the sentence of another was commuted to imprisonment for life.

[Photos of the 6 men and descriptions of their crimes can be found at http://www.nps.gov/f.../execution090375.htm The photo above is their executioner].
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Astronomy, Crime, Criminals, Executions and Executioners, Murder, Names, Native Americans, Prisons, Racism, Robbers and Outlaws, Smoking and Tobacco

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Hard times

People often complain of hard times from a mere natural tendency to growl, but a Rome, Ga. darkey, the other day, said: "Nebber seed sich times since I been born. Work all day and steal all night, and blest if I can hardly make a livin".
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Economics, Jokes, Racism, Robbers and Outlaws, Work

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
What savages think of twins

In Africa according to Dr. Robert Brown ("Races of Mankind") the birth of twins is commonly regarded as an evil omen. No one, except the twins themselves and their nearest relatives, is allowed to enter the hut in which they first saw light. The children are not to play with other children, and even the utensils of the hut are not permitted to be used by any one else.

The mother is not allowed to talk to any one not belonging to her own family. If the children both live till the end of the 6th year, it is supposed that Nature has accommodated herself to their existence, and they are thenceforth admitted to association with their fellows. Nor is this abomination of twin births restricted to Africa.

In the island of Bali, near Java, a woman who is so unfortunate as to bear twins is obliged, along with her husband, to live for a month at the sea shore or among the tombs, until she is purified. The Khasias of Hindostan consider that to have twins assimilates the mother to the lower animals, and one of them is frequently put to death.

An exactly similar belief prevails among some of the native tribes of Vancouver Island. Among the Ainos, one of the twins is always killed, and in Arebo in Guinea, both the twins and the mother are put to death (Popular Science Monthly).
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Animals / Reptiles, Birth Control, Births, Cemeteries, Children, Crime, Curiosities and Wonders, Cutlery, Family, Households, Light, Literature / Web Pages, Luck, Murder, Native Americans, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Science, Women, Superstition, Canada, Geography

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
A negro

A negro suddenly finding himself under a fire during a skirmish in the late war, prayed. This is what he prayed: "Oh! Lordy! If you're eber guine to do anythin' for this old nigger, now's your time".
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Racism, Religion, War / Weaponry, Words

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Robert Abercrombie, whose fine new house, on the hill above the Cheapside Bridge, has just been completed, gave a reception and "hop" Thurs. eve. for the benefit of the workmen who have been employed on the structure. The house has been thoroughly built, and commands a grand view of the lovely Deerfield meadows, and our neighboring mountain scenery.

The carpenters employed were Dwight Holden and George Holden and Charles E. Fisk, and they have spared no skill or labor in making a model residence. The rooms are neatly finished off in the wood [sic], and arranged after the most approved style. Mr. A. has a fine spring above his house, which is supplied from it, being piped through out for hot and cold water.

It is also fitted for gas. M.R. Pierce & Co. have done all the plumbing, piping, etc. - an important item in the structure - and C.L. Frink was employed to do the painting. The party was made as free and easy as possible. Forty or 50 people were present. Music was furnished for the dancing by John Putnam and Philo Temple, the latter of whom is a neighbor and quite a noted musician a generation ago. [See Google Books "History of Greenfield" by Francis McGee Thompson, and Lucy Cutler Kellogg].

Refreshments were dispensed in the most hospitable way, and the occasion will be long remembered by all who were present.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Amusements, Bridges, Business Enterprises, Dance, Deerfield (MA), Food, Greenfield (MA), History, Light, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Natural Resources, Parties, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Trees, Words, Work, Architecture / Construction, Water

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 17, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Court record

The second week of the Superior Court was opened at 10 o’clock Mon. The jury in the case of Peleg Adams vs. John Single, and the countersuit of Single vs. Adams, brought in a verdict on each action separately, viz.: In the former for Adams, amount $522; and in the latter for Single, $808, giving a difference in Single’s favor of $286.

The criminal cases were then taken up before the second jury as follows: Timothy Sullivan of Greenfield, on two indictments for larceny. The transaction itself was so lately chronicled that it is unnecessary to repeat it here, but simply to state that the defendant is the party who carried off Conductor Tharp’s clothing, and A.N. Hull’s shoes from the Mansion House. He was found guilty and sentenced to two years at the State Prison at Charlestown; two days solitary. District Attorney for Commonwealth.

Patrick Fraine of Charlemont was tried on two indictments. One for arson and another for larceny from the building, both being tried at the same time. The first charge was for the alleged firing of the Zoar depot last March, and the second for stealing from the same. The defendant worked upon the railroad at the Tunnel and boarded at Zoar. The parties with whom he boarded testified that Fraine came home the night of the fire at 5 minutes before 9, and the alarm was given about half past 9.

The defendant, who had no council, cross questioned the witnesses with considerable shrewdness, and brought out from the depot master the fact that some railroad men were in the depot during the eve; the west end of which was used as a store, and that there was a large fire in the stove, so much that some of the party complained of the heat, but it was claimed that the fire was out, or nearly so, when the store was closed.

The party who lived near, and who seemed to have discovered the fire first, described it as wholly confined to the southwest end, or store part, and there seemed to be no fire in the rest of the building. The evidence seemed very small to hold the defendant on the charge of arson, and the verdict of the jury acquitted the prisoner at the bar therefor.

On the allegation of larceny, the evidence was more conclusive, two witnesses testifying to the defendant having pennies and 5 cent pieces in his pockets, some being in a pocket handkerchief and others done up in a pair of stockings in the defendant’s coat at the place he boarded. On this charge he was found guilty and sentenced to 2 years in the House of Correction at Pittsfield. District Attorney for Commonwealth.

Marshall H. Porter of Williamstown and Henry Smith of South Deerfield, for larceny, and the former also for receiving stolen goods. The defendant, Porter, a dark mulatto, who gave his age as 30, said he was visiting at South Deerfield. He claimed to have had nothing to do with the larceny, but said the articles found on him were given him by Henry Moore, although he acknowledged he knew they were stolen.

It appeared by the confession of Smith, who is a bright colored boy of about 16 years of age, that the larceny alleged consisted in entering the store in the building connected with the Bloody Brook House at South Deerfield; the boy Smith watching in the shade of a large elm tree in front of the store, while Porter and Moore entered the store by the bulk-head and did the stealing. The articles taken were 2 or 3 watches, a revolver, candy, some currency and silver coin and other miscellaneous items.

Henry Moore, indicted with the others for the larceny, was bailed by his father, an was not on hand to be tried with the others. Porter and Smith were found guilty and sentenced each to 3 years at the House of Correction in Pittsfield; District Attorney for Commonwealth, A. Brainard for Smith. A bench warrant was issued for the arrest of Henry Moore, who has become scarce in this region since the time he was required at this court to plead with the others to the alleged burglary.

George Doolittle of Greenfield, for assault and battery. The present case came up on an appeal from sentence of the magistrate. The said assault and battery was made upon H.E. Keuran, while visiting the Mansion House, the defendant being keeper of the hotel. The case was virtually decided on the testimony of Doolittle himself, who, after detailing the fact of seeing Keuran passing back and forth through the bar room to the wash room, had ordered Keuran to leave and not be hanging around there, to which the reply was made that he had as much money in there as the defendant, and should go when he got ready, at same time drawing a pocket knife and threatening bodily harm if he was put out; upon which the defendant struck him with his fist, and as he was going out struck him two more blows.

The fact of any knife being drawn was denied by Keuran, who also said he had no such knife as described with him at the time. Several witnesses detailed the facts as they saw them, several testifying they saw a knife in Keuran’s hand, but the court ruled that even if there was any justification for the first blow self defense did not require the others, and according to the defendant’s own testimony, the said blows were given when Keuran was getting away about as fast as he could. Verdict of guilty. Sentence deferred. District Attorney for Commonwealth, A. DeWolf for defendant.

The case of Michael Moran for larceny came up on appeal from a magistrate’s trail, and on motion the complaint was quashed for informality. D. Aiken for defendant.
u
Frank P. Bell of Coleraine for assalt and battery had a lengthy trial occupying the most of Thurs. The alleged assault was made with a shovel upon George H. Phillips, one of the Selectmen of the Town, and also another assault upon Newton G. Lake, who was with him at the time. The defendant has not lived very peaceably with certain of his neighbors for some time, and probably dates back to the adultery case of a few years ago, at which the present defendant was one of the parties.

The present difficulty seems to have arisen about one Joshua Fairbanks, a town pauper, at the time living at Bell’s house. Mr. Phillips testified that he went to the defendant’s house, either to get Fairbanks or to notify defendant that the town would not pay for his support. Upon which the defendant ordered them away, using abusive language, and that afterward he came out armed with a shovel and not only assaulted them with his fist, but struck at them with his shovel, and finally thrust the shovel against Mr. Phillips, knocking him down.

All this the defendant denied. The jury, however, found the "Christian Hill" defendant guilty. when the time for sentencing arrived, Bell had departed, he having been on bail since his preliminary trial before the magistrate. His bail was called and defaulted, and a bench warrant issued for his arrest. District Attorney for Commmonwealth, C.C. Conant for defendant. This closed the criminal cases and the civil list was resumed with.

Joseph H. Hollister vs. Quincy Mutual Fire Insurance Co. In this case the plaintiff claims a sum due him on a policy in said company. The company, however, defend, alleging that the plaintiff has no claim on them, as he had failed to pay an assessment made in the required time, and his policy had consequently lapsed to the company. The court ordered the jury to return a verdict for the defendant, upon the law involved on an agreed statement of facts, and the case goes at once to the Supreme Court on the questions of law. C.C. Conant for plaintiff, D. Aiken for defendant.

Edward E. Coleman et al. vs. Loren S. Bartlett et al. - This was an action of contract for the recovery of the price of a turbine water wheel, made by E.E. Coleman & Co. of Shelburne Falls, for Loren S. Bartlett & Son of Northampton - the value of the wheel, worksetting the same and interest, amounting to $567.

The wheel in question was put into the mill some 2 years ago, and the contract therefor, the defendants allege, was that the plaintiffs agreed to put in the said wheel and to warrant it to work to the satisfaction of the defendants; that it should use less water and give more power than the wheel they were then using; but after trying the wheel for some time, with the same water as on the old wheel, found they got less power and could not operate the mill; and that on notice given of these facts to the defendants, they endeavored to remedy the defects, but still it did not work to their satisfaction, and they therefore refused to pay for the same.

The case was very thoroughly heard and a great amount of evidence introduced to show the conditions under which wheels are usually put into mills, the nature of turbine wheels in general, and much other matter relative thereto - of interest, perhaps to mill owners, or to the relative value of turbines and the conditions necessary to their successful working; but as a whole, the general interest in the case was not so great as in many others. Verdict for defendants. S.T. Field for plffs.; DW. Bond & H.H. Bond for defts.

Lyman J. Wait vs. Justin Thayer et al. - This case was partially presented to the jury, but was suspended to enable counsel to go to Brattleboro to take the deposition of S.F. Warner. The action is on a promissory note of $1000, given by Warner and endorsed by Thayer, Sargent & Co.of Northampton, Mr. Warner being at the time a member of the above named firm. The case attracts considerable attention on account of several nice points of commercial law involved.

While waiting for the taking of the deposition mentioned, the case of Joel R. Davenport vs. the inhabitants of Coleraine was taken up before the same jury. This action is for injury alleged to have been received by the plaintiff while traveling on the highway in said town. The case is still on trial.

The cases of Mary M. Hillman vs. The Inhabitants of Charlemont, and that of Chandler A. Vincent vs. The Inhabitants of Rowe stand next in order of trial. It will probably take the most of the present week to finish up the cases still standing for trial.
 

Subjects: Accidents, African-Americans / Blacks, Bars (Drinking establishments), Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Charlemont (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Family, Fires, Food, Government, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Hotels, Massachusetts, Missing Persons, Poor, Prisons, Racism, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans

Posted by stew - Thu, Jan 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Black King of Niam Niam



In an account of his adventures in the Upper Nile, Col. Long of the Egyptian Army, says that the black king of Niam Niam decapitated 30 of his subjects in honor of the visitor, who also accepted a girl as a royal gift. Through an interpreter she said "I want very much to go with you, but it must be on condition that you will not eat me". The colonel said he wouldn’t eat her on any consideration.

[This little gem appears to be taken from a book entitled "Centennial skyrockets: a series of flights, fancies and facts" by Rev. Titus Joslin. Wikipedia has an explanatory page about the Azande: "This name is probably of Dinka origin, and means great eaters in that language (as well as being an onomatopoeia), supposedly referring to cannibalistic propensities. This name for the Azande was in use by other tribes in Sudan, and later adopted by westerners. Naturally, today the name Niam-Niam is considered pejorative"].
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Crime, Criminals, Executions and Executioners, Explorers, Heritage Activities, History, Literature / Web Pages, Murder, Names, Racism, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Royalty, War / Weaponry, Women, Words, Arabs

Posted by stew - Tue, Jan 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Whitingham Vt.

A negro who had been lurking about the premises of Cyrus Boyd a few days, in the south part of this town, stole articles and money enough in the absence of the family to amount to $15. Wed. Aug. 4, he was found and arrested at the Glen House, and carried to Newfane Jail Thurs. for his crime.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Crime, Criminals, Economics, Family, Hotels, Police, Prisons, Racism, Robbers and Outlaws, Vermont

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
The property value of children



Article by C.S. Robinson, D.D., from the "Sunday School World", about the daughter of Scipio Africanus, the Roman Hannibal. See Wikipedia.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Children, Economics, Education, Literature / Web Pages, Religion, War / Weaponry, Women

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 30, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A Virginia colored girl, who has worked 4 years in this village, and is better than the average of domestic help, wants a place after the 1st of Sept. in this village.


 

Subjects: Advertising, African-Americans / Blacks, Greenfield (MA), Households, Racism, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 29, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
A mystery cleared up

Discovery of the mutilated remains of a missing man - The people of the quiet farming village of Petersham were greatly excited Sat., by the discovery that a most horrible murder had been committed in their midst by a farmer named Frost, a recent settler in the neighborhood, the victim being his own brother-in-law, named Frank Towne. The particulars of the bloody affair are as follows:

About 3 years ago the man Frost settled on a farm in the south part of the village, his family consisting of himself, wife, 4 children and the above named Towne, who was employed as hired man. This Towne, after laboring about a year, went off, it being generally understood that he had been unable to collect of Frost the amount of $300 due him for work. Last spring Towne reappeared, and made arrangements with Frost to hire the farm and work it himself. He restocked it, adding considerably to its value. Under the new arrangement matters went on until the 4th of July last, upon which morning both men went to the barn to milk the cows.

Returning alone shortly thereafter, Frost said Towne had gone on the hill to salt the cattle. As days passed and Towne did not appear the surprise of the neighbors was aroused, but Frost allayed temporarily all suspicion by saying that Towne had gone to Worcester where he, Frost, was to meet him to settle with him. Several incidents, however, together with Towne’s non-appearance, and the bad terms which were known to exist between the two men, led to suspicion and finally to quiet examinations and inquiries.

Frost in the meantime conducted himself in a rather strange manner not calculated to allay the suspicion of his neighbors. He was often mysteriously employed at the barn nights, never giving satisfactory accounts of the nature of his work there. This state of affairs continued up to last Friday when Frost was seen mysteriously engaged in digging a cornfield. A colored man seeing him thus at work went up to the place the next night, Sat., and found a fresh mound of earth and a piece of sack sticking out of it. Remembering the reports concerning Frost, and suspecting at once he had clue to the mystery, he gave alarm and in a short time 30 or 40 neighbors were assembled in the cornfield.

Examination was made, the sack dragged out and in it was discovered the ghastly, worm-eaten remains of a human body, or part of it, consisting of the trunk and upper part of the legs. The horrified searchers made further examination and found, several feet distant, the head of the unfortunate man, badly worm-eaten, and having behind one ear the marks of a terrible wound. The mystery was unraveled. The remains were at once identified as those of Frank Towne, and no doubt existed in any mind as to the identity of the murderer.

Sheriff Bothwell [most probably Sylvander Bothwell] of Barre was notified. On his arrival search was at once began for Frost who had disappeared. His wife was, or pretended to be, ignorant of his whereabouts, but after diligent search the murderer was discovered early Sun. morning, concealed in rubbish in the garret of his house. He took his arrest coolly, refusing to give any account of himself, and insisting that Towne had gone from Worcester to Washington. He was taken to Barre and safely confined.

Putting circumstances together the evidence seems clear that the fateful deed was committed on that July morning in the barn, when a quarrel is supposed to have taken place between the two, Frost finally knocking down Towne with a single blow from a sledge hammer, the wound at the back of the head showing it came from such an instrument. Frost’s frequent night labors in the barn is now accounted for by the supposition that he was then engaged in cutting up and burying his victim.

Becoming alarmed at the suspicion of the neighbors he is supposed to have removed part of the body to the cornfield. He refuses to tell where the rest of the body is concealed. In the cellar of the house a pocket book belonging to Towne was found, and within it a note against Frost for the amount of $300. Closer examination in the barn disclosed clots of dried blood, tufts of hair, and other unmistakable evidences that the dread crime had been committed there. (Athol Transcript).

[Whew! This one was tough to identify. But I finally found an article about it in the Aug. 6, 1875 New York Times online index, under the title "Shocking murder at Petersham Mass." The murdered man is named Frederick P. Towne, and the murderer S.J. Frost or Samuel J. Frost. Frost was the last man executed in Worcester in May of 1876].


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Animals / Reptiles, Athol (MA), Barber / Hair, Beverages, Crime, Criminals, Economics, Executions and Executioners, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Garbage, Households, Insects, Literature / Web Pages, Lost and Found, Massachusetts, Missing Persons, Murder, Obituaries, Police, Prisons, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 29, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
A slave romance

A touching though somewhat ludicrous scene occurred at Baltimore a few days ago. About 20 years ago a Negro woman was sold from there to parties "way down South", her father and mother remaining on the estate from which she was sold, and where they still reside. During the war the old folks lost all traces of the girl, and had given her up for lost, until within a few years, when they heard from her in New Orleans.

A few weeks ago they had a letter from her promising soon to visit them, and from that time the old couple went to the wharf every time a boat arrived, expecting to meet her, and showing keen disappointment on finding that she had not yet come. At last, however, they were rewarded for their watching as a buxom, comely mulatto waved a handkerchief at them from an approaching boat. The old woman shouted, executed a half fandango, skipped around generally, while the old man stood on his head, and the hour of jubilee seemed to have come.


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Dance, Family, Literature / Web Pages, Missing Persons, Racism, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Sales, Transportation, War / Weaponry, Women

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Charles Nally

Charles Nally, to whom belongs the honor of being the last victim of the old fugitive slave law in York State, died at Washington last week. Nally escaped from his owner in Virginia, and coming north, found employment in Troy. One day in 1860, when returning to his work, he was seized by the officers and carried before the United States Commissioner, who remanded him to the charge of his old master.

Meanwhile a large crowd of colored people had gathered, who after a long and determined struggle, succeeded in rescuing him. He was taken across the Hudson and back into the country, where he was kept until a sufficient sum had been raised to satisfy his owner. For the past few years he has lived in Washington, where he has been employed as a messenger in the Post Office department. One of his daughters is the wife of State Senator Ruby of Mississippi.

[Apparently his wife Lucy was a mulatto, and made many whites "uncomfortable" when she married George Thompson Ruby].


 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Economics, Family, Government, Law and Lawyers, Mail, Obituaries, Police, Politics, Racism, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Died

Smith, Jerusha (colored), age 18, daughter of Robert Smith, died in South Deerfield on July 19.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Deerfield (MA), Obituaries, Racism

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Indiana statutes

Indiana has still on her statue books [i.e. statute books] a law prohibiting the intermarriage of white and colored persons under penalty of imprisonment in the state penitentiary for not less than 1 year nor more than 10 years, and a fine of not less than $1000 nor more than $5000, with a similar penalty for anyone who aids or assists in the commission of the act.

Under this law the grand jury of Floyd County have just indicted John A. Miller, a German of Moorsfield, who recently married a negro woman, and Rev. Jesse Bass, pastor of the Bethel Baptist Colored Church http://www.bethelameannarbor.org/history.cfm of New Albany, who performed the ceremony, and they are both in jail awaiting trial.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Economics, Germans, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Police, Prisons, Racism, Religion

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
News of the week

Lewis Thomson, [also seen as Lewis Thompson], colored, who brutally outraged a young lady at Iuka, Miss. last May, and was sentenced last Mon. to imprisonment for life, was taken from jail Tues. night by disguised men and hanged.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Executions and Executioners, Murder, Prisons, Racism, Rape, Women, Vigilance Committees

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 11, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Orange

The irrepressible organ grinder was in town on Thurs., together with a large delegation of gentlemen of sable hue, and the town, for one day, at least, was happy.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Amusements, Music, Orange (MA), Racism

Posted by stew - Wed, Dec 10, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Bernardston

Week before last was one of picnics, emphatically so, at Sylvan Grove in this town. On Mon. the 5th, the Hibernians from Keene N.H. celebrated the nation’s birthday by a picnic, which was numerously attended, there being several car loads of men, women and children. They brought their favorite beer in great abundance, and their own police to preserve order and guard the festivities of the occasion from all interruption that might ensue from the "working" of the beer. The police were mostly of the Yankee blood, large and powerful looking men.

They brought along with them two fine bands of music, a brass band, and a string band, to stir the soul with harmony. National pride was quite apparent on this occasion, several of the leading ones wearing the green plume and other trappings of Irish nationality. Upon one large and beautiful banner, we saw the name of Emmett, a name dear to every Irish heart, and a name worthy to be revered by every patriot. Upon the whole this picnic appeared to be a very enjoyable affair, and well enjoyed by all concerned, giving no unfavorable impressions of the Irish character.

There were some very sprightly and amusing single jig dancing, both by males and females, which was almost "super" Yankee. [?] There was only one beer fight, and this was soon checked by the long, bony arms of a Yankee policeman. One of those combatants did not belong to the party from Keene. As soon as clear from the grasp of the policeman, he made tracks as fast as his ten toes could carry him, for fear of being handcuffed and tied to a tree, a summary, but very proper and effective way of treating the license loving public when inclined to pugilistic sentiments.

At a seasonable hour the party all left for their homes in sober good nature, all feeling they had had a good time, and honored the birth of their adopted country. The next picnic in order was that of the two Baptist Societies from Springfield, called the Sunday School Picnic, and was the largest gathering of the kind held at Sylvan Grove this season, there being 9 car loads of old and young, and was evidently a gathering of [?] first social rank of the place. They also had two bands of music, a brass band and a string band, and in addition they had a choir of male singers, whose vocal powers can hardly be beat if equaled.

We cannot recall the time when we have been so highly pleased with social music. And we were not a little surprised, but very "agreeably" so, to learn that the Baptist people can "trip it on the light fantastic toe", and call the same an innocent and sinless amusement, as well as other professing Christians. Truly old prejudices are giving way and common sense is gaining ground...

Thurs. July 8, a colored picnic from Springfield occupied Sylvan Grove, numbering 201 grown up persons of both sexes, and 31 children. They called themselves the Pilgrim Baptists, and during their stay here their conduct was very exemplary and seemed perfectly consistent with the Christian name and character. Their sense of Christian propriety forbade them to indulge in dancing exercises, which seems almost an instinct of the African race, consequently they had no music but vocal, some of which was exceedingly charming to the ear. They were scrupulously neat in appearance, well dressed, though not fantastically so, which is considered by many to be an African characteristic.

They were all shades, from a jet black to a light quadroon, many of them having the straight auburn hair and the Saxon blue eye. Many of them gave evidence of a good degree of general intelligence and learning, being able to converse with ease upon various topics, especially religious topics, to which they seemed much inclined. Their demeanor, through the day, was such as to claim the respect of every one present; and we were very willing to admit that they rightfully belonged to the great Christian brotherhood of man.

Several of the first class citizens of the place showed them marks of politeness and courtesy, by carrying them about town in their carriages. "A blessing on him who cheers the downtrodden".

Fri. July 9, the Unitarian Society from Northampton held a picnic at Sylvan Grove. This party numbered 150, a number highly respectable for the Society, which we understand is quite small. It was quite evident from appearances that this party was composed of people of both sexes from the first circles of refined society in points of politeness and moral culture. They were accompanied by a band of music of 6 pieces, called the Arlan Orchestra, T.S. Billings, leader, a gentleman highly distinguished for musical talents, as also were the others of the band. The music of this band probably cannot be beat by any band in Western Massachusetts. Mr. Billings is, no doubt, an amateur of music from birth.

Of course a dance followed the sweet strains of this music; indeed, they couldn’t help it, so bewitching is the power of music over the head and heels. Among the dancers first up on this occasion we saw an old gentleman, 83 years old; and had you seen nothing of him but the nimble and elastic step of his feet, you certainly would have said those feet were not more than 20 years old; a remarkable instance of green old age. This was no less a man than David Damon, a well known citizen in the first circles of Northampton society. [See the Google book "Early Northampton", 1914],

(Pardon us for calling names). Nothing happened in word or deed to mar the enjoyment of this pleasant occasion. There was no smell of ’license" stronger than good tea and coffee, with plenty of cool lemonade. Joy and social kindness shone in every countenance, showing the unspeakable advantages of refined society. Even the gentle bearing and graceful manners of the little children lent a charm to the occasion. Such a picnic we would gladly see repeated. Scribe.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Amusements, Barber / Hair, Bernardston (MA), Beverages, Children, Dance, Drunkenness, Education, Etiquette, Eye, Family, Fashion, Food, Government, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Heritage Activities, Holidays, Horses, Irish, Law and Lawyers, Liquors, Massachusetts, Music, Names

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 8, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
A movement

A movement has been established in Washington to establish a newspaper to be conducted solely by colored people.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Literature / Web Pages

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 8, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 12, 1875
Bernardston

The Irish picnicked here Mon. of last week. the Baptists of Springfield and Holyoke Wed.; the negroes of Conn. Valley Thurs., and the Unitarians from Northampton Fri.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Amusements, Bernardston (MA), Food, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Irish, Religion

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 6, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 12, 1875
News of the week

No less than 27 murders which occurred in the Indian territory have just been disposed of by the United States circuit court at Fort Smith, Arkansas. Out of this no. 8 were convicted of murder in the first degree, 7 of whom, including two boys, one aged 17 and one 19, will be hanged together on the 3rd of Sept. next. The eighth, a negro, was killed after his conviction, while attempting to escape from the guard. Much outrage prevails in the Indian territory; no less than 10 men have been killed in the vicinity of Fort Smith http://www.legendsof.../AR-IsaacParker.html within a few months.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Executions and Executioners, Murder, Native Americans, Prisons, War / Weaponry


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