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Oct 19, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Vacations

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Clara Morris



Clara Morris - a terrible surgical operation - The wonderful surgical operation performed on the person of Clara Morris, the well known New York actress, in Paris, is described in a letter from a friend of that lady. "Miss Morris’ disease was curvature of the spine.Treated years ago, it could probably have been arrested, but it was a crisis in her profession, and upon success in surmounting many obstacles, her whole future seemed to depend, and she could not spare time for a medical treatment.



A sea voyage failed entirely to produce any change for the better, and a list of the highest medical authorities abroad confirmed her worst fears and condemned her to a horrible operation, the same which Charles Sumner submitted to, for the cure of the same disease. Its main feature is the burning of the flesh of the back from the neck down to the waist with red hot irons.



The operation was performed in Paris, in the presence of Mrs. Worthington, Miss Gabrielle Greeley and Sir William Belmore, the attending physician. Miss Gabrielle Greeley also writes a letter to a New Yorker in which she says "Poor Clara was obliged to sit on a low chair with her back bared, and she went through the operation with her face pale and rigid as marble. Dr. Belvin lit his furnace, and the roaring of the flames that was to heat the iron to a white heat in a few seconds was dreadful to hear, and while this was going on Professor Ball marked with a pencil the line the iron was to follow on either side of the spine.

Every touch of the pencil sent a thrill through the delicate frame of the poor victim, but the Professor had scarcely ended making the penciled marks when with a flash the iron was applied. It was dreadful. The white point seemed to sink an inch into the quivering form, and it was all over. The doctor said it was a wonderful exhibit of nerves."


 

Subjects: Diseases, Fires, French, Furniture, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Politics, Quacks and Quackery, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Show Business, Transportation, Vacations, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Deerfield

The season has been an unusually lively one on Deerfield Street...the many strangers with the young people of the village keeping up a round of pleasures. But summer boarders are now taking their departure, and we shall soon settle down to our customary ways.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Children, Deerfield (MA), Roads, Vacations

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items



Greenfield - Patrick Dunnigan, belonging in this town, was in his second year at Nicolet College, which is situated [?] miles below Montreal on the St. Lawrence, met a sad death on the night of Sept. 7. He had been home on a vacation, and with 2 or 3 fellow students was returning to the college, which is conducted by secular priests. Taking a steamboat at Montreal, Dunnigan accidentally fell overboard at Three Rivers, unbeknown [sic] to his comrades.

His body was not found until Sept. 14, when it had drifted 40 miles below Montreal. His friends here did not hear of his death until informed by a dispatch last week. His brother, James Dunnigan, went north for his remains Thurs. night, and returned Sat. morning. The funeral from the Catholic Church Sat. forenoon, was attended by a large number of people.

The young man is spoken of in the highest esteem by all who knew him, on account of his quiet, studious habits and amiable disposition. He was studying for the ministry, and was possessor of considerable talent. He was 21 years of age and leaves a widowed mother.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Education, Family, Greenfield (MA), Obituaries, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Telegraphs / Telephones, Transportation, Vacations, Widows and Widowers, Canada

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Greenfield - Mr. and Mrs. George A. Kimball took a trip to the White Mountains last week.


 

Subjects: Greenfield (MA), New Hampshire, Vacations

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Conway

Conway - It is said that Arthur Tucker and R.M. Cook have been taking a short trip to the sea shore. There are some new goods in Mr. Tucker's store since his return.
 

Subjects: Businesspeople, Conway (MA), Rich People, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Stores, Retail, Vacations, Vendors and Purchasers

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Conway

Conway - Mrs. Swan, wife of the cashier of the Conway Bank, with her little daughter, are away with friends in Connecticut. We wish them a pleasant time.

http://www.faqs.org/...ssachusetts.html#top
 

Subjects: Children, Conway (MA), Connecticut, Economics, Family, Vacations, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Hampshire County items

J.C. Newton of Holyoke has returned from his year's trip to California and the West.
 

Subjects: Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Rich People, Trains, Vacations

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 23, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
From Turin to Florence

From Turin to Florence, by P. Thorne (Mrs. Fayette Smith) [long article].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Italians, Vacations, Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - Cole, of the Shelburne Falls House, has returned from a long sojourn at Saratoga. He is very much benefited, but his wife is to remain a while longer.
 

Subjects: Businesspeople, Hotels, Medicine / Hospitals, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Vacations, Water

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 19, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Hawley

Hawley - Moody Spring is having its quota of visitors this season. Several persons from abroad have taken possession of the old Hitchcock house nearby, where, undisturbed, they drink freely of these healthful waters, luxuriate in blackberries and feast on the wild scenery.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Food, Households, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Vacations, Hawley (MA), Water

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 19, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
An excursion



The Connecticut River Railroad has issued excursion tickets to the White Mountains and back at very low rates. They take the excursionists to the top of Mount Washington and are good from the 11th to the 21st for the upward passage and on the return to the 25th, inclusive. The price of tickets are to the Profile House and return, $9; Fabyan House, $8; Crawford House, $8.50; top of Mt. Washington $11.50. This is a favorable time of year to visit the White Mountains and the fare is very low.


 

Subjects: Amusements, Economics, Hotels, New Hampshire, Trains, Vacations

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 16, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Mr. Beecher and Lake Pleasant



Mr. Beecher and Lake Pleasant - Your correspondent, induced by feelings of regret at Mr. Beecher’s announced visit to Lake Pleasant, called upon him during the week, at his summer home, the Twin Mountain House, and by a personal interview learned that your article of last week did him great injustice. Having a letter signed by all the clergy of this immediate vicinity, I found ready access to Mr. Beecher, though he must be often annoyed by visitors who, from their position, have more claim upon his attention than I. Further, the letter expressing, as it did, the Christian sentiment of this vicinity, found a quick response in Mr. Beecher’s heart, and a long conference revealed the following facts which are quite in antagonism to those published by you last week.



First - that Mr. Beecher was led to feel, that by a visit to Lake Pleasant, he would confer a favor upon his numerous friends in all this region - that there were many to whom it would be a lifelong pleasure to have once listened to him, so he should declare the Gospel unto them. Among the recent gatherings at Lake Pleasant, and their gala day character he knew nothing. When he learned that these gatherings in the past, had predjudiced [i.e. prejudiced] the Christian mind against a similar meeting there under similar conditions, though it should be in the interests of the Gospel, Mr. Beecher with true nobility of soul replied "In all matters where my own conscience will not be violated I defer most heartily and readily to the convictions of my ministerial brethren, and shall do in this".

Second - that as far as Mr. Beecher was concerned, there was no "stroke of business" at all to the arrangement. The inference in your article, that it was the compensation offered that had led him to accept the invitation to speak at Lake Pleasant, needs correction and emphatic denial.



In the course of the arrangements when compensation was spoken of, Mr. Beecher replied that "he had never taken a penny for outside work, save for his lectures, never a penny for charity addresses, never a penny for sermons preached during his vacation, never a penny for campaigning in support of political doctrines, as he did in 1856 when he made 3 addresses a week, sometimes of 3 hours each in the open air, during which campaign he even insisted upon paying his own expenses, that he might be above all criticism"; and then in substance added, I shall not accept anything for this service more than careful provision for my personal comfort.

Later, an excursion to the Tunnel having been proposed in connection with his stay here, he declined even this, in part because it would have the appearance of being a return for services rendered. It would seem therefore that the only parties interested in this as a worldly matter of dollars and cents are the railroads; and it is certain it was not from love to any of these, nor from a desire to fill their purses that led Mr. Beecher into this arrangement, but other motives, pure and noble, influenced him.

As to Mr. Beecher’s views concerning the sanctity of the Sabbath and the way in which it should be observed, I need say nothing, as last Sabbath in the course of a reply to certain criticisms upon his course that had appeared in the Vermont Chronicle, he announced that he should soon engage in the discussion of the Sabbath question.

I believe however, that he differs not so much from many of us in relation to Sabbath observance in our rural districts. He affirms that he is not settled about excursion trains in general, but when the possibility of his speaking in Greenfield on the 19th was referred to, his answering question was "How can you stop the trains?"

Whatever his view may be, it is certain that he is unwilling to violate the consciences of his brethren, if he can yield to them without violating his humor. Withal, I am convinced that Mr. Beecher in the matter referred to in your article last week, is deserving of no censure from the Christian public, but rather is worthy of imitation by them in the frankness in which he considered and recognized the judgment of those whom he felt to be better qualified than himself to judge, because of their better knowledge of fact involved; and also worthy of imitation in the promptness with which he acted in the matter.

The criticisms that have been so freely passed by many of us upon Mr. Beecher’s connection with the affair, have been criticisms of a misinformed man and hence Christian courtesy demands that we recall them. But while we draw the arrows let us apply as well the balm to heal. F.A. Warfield.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Business Enterprises, Charity, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Hotels, Lake Pleasant (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), New Hampshire, Politics, Religion, Trains, Vacations, Vermont, War / Weaponry, Words

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Greenfield - Spencer B. Root and Frank J. Pratt returned Fri. night from their trip in the Indian country. Their party went on to the Pacific Slope of the Rocky Mountains, and shot such game as bears and deer, without getting into any trouble with the Indian tribes. They saw W.L. Jenkins, the former Cashier of the First National Bank at Denver, Colorado. Mr. J., who went out there for his health, has greatly improved, having grown quite fleshy, and is looking tough and rugged enough.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Diseases, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Native Americans, Vacations, War / Weaponry, Work

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
News about home (Greenfield)



Greenfield - Register Thompson and Town Clerk Pond had rare sport fishing, down near Sherbrook, Nova Scotia, where they were guests of Newell Snow for some 3 weeks. What would some of the fishers in our local streams think of 75 pounds of trout as the result of half an hour’s piscatorial effort.

That is what THEY did down there. Mr. T. outlined one of the speckled treasures which he caught, and shows the profile to his credulous friends. The fish was about a foot and a half long, and weighed a good 3 pounds. They camped out nights, waded through swamps and bogs, fished, ate, and were happy, and came home browned and toughened, in prime condition, to resume the cares and troubles of every day life.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Art, Courts, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Greenfield (MA), Sports, Vacations, Canada

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Great fire at South Deerfield

Great fire at South Deerfield - over $40,000 worth of property destroyed. One of the most destructive conflagrations that has ever visited Franklin County raged at South Deerfield Sat. night, sweeping out of existence the two village hotels, the finest private dwelling house in the place, a manufacturing establishment, a livery stable with several buildings, sheds and other property.

About 15 minutes before 12 o’clock, fire was discovered in the trimming room, in the second story of the ell part of John Ockington’s carriage shop, which was located on Depot Street, a little west of the Main street of the village. Before the alarm became general the flames with almost lightning rapidity spread to the main building, a large 2 story wooden structure, used for the various branches of the carriage business, and a repository for finished work.

Mr. Ockington’s books were rescued, and a portion of his stock, but a carryall, buggy, express wagon, sleigh, and a no. of carriages in different stages of construction, tools and lumber and stock of various kind were destroyed. ..The wind, which was blowing strongly from the north and north west, carried the flying cinders in the direction of Main Street.

Ten and a half ft. from the shop was the livery stable owned by W. Houston and occupied by Frank Warren. Hardly 15 minutes from the breaking out of the fire the stable had caught, and in a very short time was reduced to ashes...The next building reached by the devouring fire fiend was the Hayden Hotel, a large 2 story wooden building in the south west corner of Main Street and Depot Street, 75 ft. distant from the stable. It was owned by L. Hayden and occupied by his son Charles Hayden.

...Nearly all the furniture was removed from the building, but still considerable valuable property was destroyed. Miss Benn Hayden occupied a fancy goods store in the block, and her stock was nearly all saved.

100 ft. to the south on Main Street was Loren Hayden’s fine dwelling house, built but a short time ago, the most extensive residence in South Deerfield, and well furnished. Only a part of the furniture was saved, and the building and most of its contents were soon in ashes. In the rear, 27 ft. distance, was a large new barn which with its contents of hay and grain were destroyed....

While the conflagration was waging its war of destruction upon this corner of the street, another had broken out with equal fury on the opposite corner. The Bloody Brook House, belonging to C.P. Aldrich, was in a few moments a mass of flames. This long building, extending over 100 ft. on Main Street, with a new ell on Depot Street, its barns and numerous outbuildings melted before the flames like frost beneath the rays of the sun.

Efforts were made to clear out the contents but they were mostly unavailing, and the furniture, a piano, billiard table, provisions, bedding, etc. were lapped up by the greedy element. In the large grocery store of L.T. Harris, in the ell part of the building, but little was taken out. Scudder, a jeweler, saved most of his stock, but shot himself through the hand while handling one of his revolvers. J.T. Burnett occupied a room as a barber shop, but met no serious loss.

S.F. Fisher, who had a harness shop in the building, packed his goods and tools in trunks, and saved nearly all. P. Corkins, the shoemaker, another occupant, was alike fortunate. Several boarders in the hotel lost their clothing, but fortunately no one perished or was seriously injured.

Providentially there was a change in the wind, and the fire made no further progress in a northerly direction; though a horse belonging to Edward Jones of Greenfield, which is adjacent, was scorched and vigilant watching was required to prevent it from igniting. O.S. Arms’ house, on the east side of Main Street opposite Hayden’s, was several times on fire. All of the furniture was taken out, and by cutting through the roof and applying water as best they could when flames were discovered, he and his neighbors managed to save the building.

On the corner of Main Street opposite the Hayden hotel, is a large wooden building belonging to C.A. Pierce. This too was scorched. and the roof was frequently on fire, but it was saved without serious damage. Its occupants, M. Roch, druggist, Boyd & Houghton, dry goods, Mrs. B. Parsons Mansfield, milliner, O.S. Arms, post office and shoe store removed a portion or all of their goods, and had them more or less damaged. William B. Houston, who occupied a tenement on the 2nd floor, had his furniture taken out.

Deacon L.H. Fellow’s house, some 20 ft. from the post office, was also on fire and its contents taken out, but the fire was kept at bay by the use of small hand pumps, such as are used in gardens and in washing carriages. C. Mosher’s livery stable was saved in the same way. Numerous other houses and buildings were at different times on fire, but the assembled people were able to put them out.

South Deerfield is without a fire engine, reservoir, or any organized means for extinguishing fire. The people who assembled in obedience to the alarm could do little but assist in moving furniture and goods, and the fire in the destruction of the buildings mentioned had it all its own way. Within two hours from the breaking out of the flames in Ockington’s shop they had done their work, and nothing was left but tottering chimneys and smouldering embers.

About a quarter past 12 a dispatch was sent to Springfield for help and an hour or two after, two steamers and a hose cart arrived, making the run from Springfield in 40 minutes; but it was too late to be of service, and if the engines had come earlier there would have been little water that could have been made use of. The train soon returned.

The Deerfield Guards, under Captain B.F. Bridges, who had returned from msuter the afternoon previous, were early called to guard the property scattered about the streets. Some disturbance was created by boys who had confiscated liquors, but it was quelled without serious trouble. The fire was seen for miles, and burning brands were carried as far as Sunderland.

Mr. L. Hayden was so prostrated from the excitement incident to the fire that there were rumors yesterday that he was not likely to survive; but these rumors were probably exaggerated. John Ockington, one of the principle sufferers, is away at the seaside.

[Article goes on to discuss policies and amount of insurance, but this is all nicely listed in the NYTimes article].

Though there is some doubt about the origin of the fire, the prevailing belief is inclined to incendiarism. There had been no fire about the carriage shop after 3 o’clock the previous afternoon. The place in the building where it broke out was quite a distance from the forging shop. The calamity is a serious blow to the community.

[See the article "Losses by fire" in the Sept. 6, 1875 issue of the New York Times Online Archive].
 

Subjects: Accidents, Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Astronomy, Barber / Hair, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Children, Crime, Criminals, Deerfield (MA), Drugstores / Drugs, Economics, Fires, Food, Furniture, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, History, Horses, Hotels, Households, Ice, Juvenile Delinquents, Lightning

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Shelburne



Shelburne - Quite a little company were selected to witness the ceremony of marriage of Myron Dole to Miss Anna Wilkinson Wed. eve., Sept. 1, at the house of the officiating clergyman, the Rev. Mr. Marsh, the bride being a sort of adopted daughter of Mr. Marsh. The happy pair have gone on a bridal tour to the sea coast.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Households, Marriage and Elopement, Orphans and Orphanages, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Vacations

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

(Greenfield) The Beecher party, consisting of 5 persons, en route from the White Mountains, will stop in Greenfield on Sat. the 18th, having engaged rooms at the Mansion House. They remain over Sun., on which day Mr. Beecher is to preach at Lake Pleasant.
 

Subjects: Greenfield (MA), Hotels, Lake Pleasant (MA), Montague (MA), Religion, Trains, Vacations, Vermont

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

(Greenfield) Captain Withey wound up the days of his bachelorhood last week. "Only the brave deserves the fair". The Captain served his country with an untarnished record, and his "re-enlistment" is sure to be an honorable and happy one. The bride is Miss L.M. Ross, who has been a temporary resident in our village, and the bands were tied at Grafton, Vt. The pair are making a brief tour.
 

Subjects: Greenfield (MA), Marriage and Elopement, Vacations, Vermont, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

(Greenfield) John A. Clark, formerly of the Federal Street market, now of Columbus, Ga., is paying his old friends a brief visit. They are all glad to take him by the hand once more.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Emigration and Immigration, Food, Greenfield (MA), Stores, Retail, Vacations

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

(Greenfield) Dr. C.C. Haskell returned on Fri. from his Western trip, having been absent a month. His office, while he was away, was under the charge of George Andrews.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Greenfield (MA), Medical Personnel, Vacations

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Hampshire County items

Belchertown was excited Fri. over a very sad affair, two girls, each about 16 years old, attempting to kill themselves with morphine Thurs. night, one of them dying Fri. morning. They were Miss Frances S. Bridgman, an adopted daughter of Calvin Bridgman http://bhshistorypro...lepages.com/commerce and Miss Nettie Barrett, only daughter of Mrs. Silas Barrett of South Amherst, who was stopping in town.

The girls, who had been together most of the time, got their morphine of Mr. Barnes, the druggist Thurs. eve., and took the dose the same night. Fortunately Miss Bridgman was taken with vomiting, and so recovered, but Miss Barrett died at half past ten o’clock the next day. The cause for the deed is not known as yet. Mr. and Mrs. Bridgman had been to the sea side, but were expected to return Fri. night.
 

Subjects: Children, Drug Abuse, Drugstores / Drugs, Family, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Obituaries, Orphans and Orphanages, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Suicide, Vacations

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 17, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Montague

The camp meeting cannot be without some slight effect upon us. Whether it is the great amount of travel, or for the sake of showing people that "competition is the life of business", that has developed two lines of coaches between here and the camp ground, we do not know. R.N. Clapp runs a branch store there, and we hope he may do well. Postmaster Chenery spends most of his time on the grounds, being among the number of police; and for the accommodation of the campers, has obtained leave from Washington, to deliver mails from his branch office, and receive them off the cars at the lake. We express a hope too, that our landlord, Wildes, may have a busy time during campmeeting. He has already received several summer boarders.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Hotels, Lake Pleasant (MA), Mail, Montague (MA), Police, Religion, Stores, Retail, Trains, Transportation, Vacations

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 17, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items



Wendell T. Davis Esq., just before returning home, was a guest, with a few other Americans, of Minister Washburne [Elihu Benjamin Washburne].

[See Google Books "The national cyclopaedia of American Biography, or Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: French, Greenfield (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Politics, Vacations, Europe

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 12, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
News of the week



There was another accident at Niagara Falls last week that narrowly escaped proving fatal. William E. Brook of Trenton, N.J., engaged a guide and started for a trip under the Horse Shoe Fall [i.e. Horseshoe Falls], on the Canadian side. When directly under Table Rock, a huge piece of rock, weighing at least two tons, fell from above, narrowly missing the guide and just grazing Mr. Brook's shoulders, while a large fragment struck his leg, bruising it badly, crushing his foot and pinning him to the ground, so that it took 20 minutes to get him clear.
 

Subjects: Accidents, Amusements, Furniture, Horses, Natural Resources, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Transportation, Vacations, Canada

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Coleraine

Situated up among the hills, yet we have some beautiful valleys as well as the lovely mountain scenery - we are a busy people - few if any loungers or unemployed, all have something to do, notwithstanding the cry of hard times so often heard. There are 3 cotton mills, many more lumber mills, 2 butter box manufactories, most kinds of mechanic shops, all of which are doing a good business.

Some very fine carriages are made here; there are several stores, 5 churches, two Methodist Episcopal, one Congregational, 2 Baptist. Five secret societies, viz. Grand Army Post, Sons of Temperance, two Sovereigns of Industry and a Grange; that we have a good hotel we hardly need assert as those who pass this way know, as well as others who read the papers.

We have many good farms well cultivated and from appearances are about to yield satisfactory harvests; the late rains have done much to improve crops. The farmers are getting wiser and are raising less tobacco than in former years, other crops receiving more attention such as grass, corn, oats, etc. and are looking well.

We know of no place in town where intoxicating liquors are sold, and one drunk is rarely seen. We have no railroad but there is considerable talk of one. Our schools, some 15 in number, are good, comparing favorably with those around us, and our mail facilities and modes of conveyance to and from are equal to larger towns, and places on railroads with the exception of the iron horse.

A good number from more crowded towns stopping here during the warm weather, yet there is room for others.
 

Subjects: Bars (Drinking establishments), Business Enterprises, Clubs, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Horses, Hotels, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Religion, Smoking and Tobacco, Stores, Retail, Temperance, Trains, Transportation, Vacations, War / Weaponry, Weather, Work, Grange, National


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