You are not logged in.   
Username: 
Password: 

Forgot password / Verify | Sign up now! | Printer Friendly

The Franklin County Publication Archive Index is constantly updated. By creating an account you can elect to receive notices when new articles are added and when people comment on the articles.

Join today!

 

Oct 19, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Rich People

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Bummers in San Francisco

Bummers in San Francisco ... San Francisco has a ...full ... of bummers. Nowhere else can a worthless fellow too lazy to work, too cowardly to steal, get on so well. The climate befriends him, for he can sleep out of doors 4/5 of the year, and the free lunch opens to him boundless vistas of carnal delights. He can gorge himself daily, for a nominal sum get a dinner that a king would envy for 50 cents.




There are two classes of saloons where the midday repasts are furnished - two-bit places and one-bit places. In the first he gets a drink and a meal. In the second he gets a drink and a meal of inferior quality. He pays for the drink, 25 or 15 cents, according to the grade of the place, and gets his meal for nothing.



This consists of,in the better class of establishment, soup, boiled salmon, roast beef of the best quality, bread and butter, potatoes, tomatoes, crackers, and cheese.
Many of these places are fitted up in a style of Oriental grandeur. A stragner entering one of them casually might be under the delusion that he had found his way by mistake to the salon of a San Francisco millionaire.

He would find mirrors reaching from floor to ceiling, carpets of the finest texture and most appropriate patterns, massive tables covered with papers and periodicals, the walls embellished with expensive paintings. A large picture which had adorned a famous drink bar and free lunch house was sold the other day for $12,500. Some of the keepers are men of education and culture. One is an art critic of high local repute, who has written ...very readable...San Francisco. Scribner’s.

[After struggling to read this, I found it to be an excerpt of Scribner’s Monthly, July 1875, "The city of the Golden Gate", by Samuel Williams, p. 274].


 

Subjects: Art, Chinese, Dreams / Sleep, Economics, Education, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Furniture, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Meat, Rich People, Robbers and Outlaws, Royalty, Sales, Tramps, Vendors and Purchasers, Weather, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Marriages

Married in Holyoke Sept. 8, Frederick H. Warner of Boston to Eleanor Skinner, eldest daughter of William Skinner.

[For more information, see Google Books "Encyclopedia of Massachusetts, biographical--genealogical, Volume 6"
by William Richard Cutter].
 

Subjects: Boston (MA), Family, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Massachusetts, Rich People

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Northfield



Northfield - The Evangelists Moody and Sankey, with Prof. [?] and Col. Whittle, had a consultation with George P. Stuart



and L.P. Rowland of Philadelphia,William E. Dodge Jr. and R.R. McBurney of New York, and D.W. McWilliams, T.H. Mervin and W.W. Wicks of Brooklyn at Northfield Tues., over the proposed revival campaign in America.

No definite decision was arrived at as to the point for beginning this work, although the sentiment was for either New York or Philadelphia, with the probability that the last place will be selected. The work will be begun about November, and meantime Mr. Sankey has gone to his home at Newcastle, Pa. Mr. Moody will remain in Northfield, [?] and Bliss will work in the West and Southwest, and [?] will begin in St. Paul, Minn.
 

Subjects: Northfield (MA), Religion, Rich People, Work

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Orange

Orange - Prescott Foskett, a respected citizen and well-to-do farmer, committed suicide by hanging himself at Orange, Sat. afternoon the 11th. He visited his son's wife, and deposited his spectacles, money, and a few mementos, stating that he was going to put himself out of the way. Upon being asked what was the trouble, he said he had seen trouble enough.

His son was immediately informed of his father's intentions, and a search was commenced for him, but after an hour proved unsuccessful; then an alarm was given, and business about the place was generally suspended. After another hour search, the body of Mr. Foskett was found suspended to a tree, about a half a mile from his son's house. The act occasions intense excitement in the vicinity. Domestic troubles are said to have led to the act. He was about 68 years old.
 

Subjects: Economics, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Households, Marriage and Elopement, Orange (MA), Rich People, Suicide, Trees

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Conway

Conway - It is said that Arthur Tucker and R.M. Cook have been taking a short trip to the sea shore. There are some new goods in Mr. Tucker's store since his return.
 

Subjects: Businesspeople, Conway (MA), Rich People, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Stores, Retail, Vacations, Vendors and Purchasers

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Hampshire County items

J.C. Newton of Holyoke has returned from his year's trip to California and the West.
 

Subjects: Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Rich People, Trains, Vacations

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 19, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Hawley



Hawley - J.U. Houston, our village blacksmith, has been making 3 pairs of his chain bits for Mrs. George William Curtis of Ashfield, who is quite a horsewoman. These bits are made in the highest style of art, and being plated with nickel, shine like silver, and do not tarnish. Strength and beauty are here combined, and any horse that wears them may thus far well be proud of his adornments. A woman of taste, on seeing them, remarked that they were almost good enough for a lady's adornments.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Art, Ashfield (MA), Business Enterprises, Horses, Rich People, Women, Hawley (MA), Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 12, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Catamount Hill Coleraine Reunion

The Catamount HIll Coleraine Reunion - The reunion of the present and former members of Catamount Hill, Coleraine occurred on Wed. Sept. 1. There was quite a large gathering of people, and the exercises which were as follows, were interesting and endorsed by those present: Reading of Scriptures by Andrus Shippee [also seen as Andros Shippee], President of the day, from Benjamin Farley’s old family Bible; Prayer by Daniel Davenport, an old resident of the hill; Hymn, Coronation Chronological History, by Dr. A.F. Davenport; Hymn, arranged for the occasion:

"This mountain, ’tis of thee
Land of sweet memory
Of thee we sing
Land where our fathers died
Land of their early pride
Aye from this mountain side
Let music ring.

Our native Mountain, thee
Land of the parent tree
Thy name we love.
We love the rocks and rills
Thy woods and towering hills
Our heart within us thrills
Like that above.

Welcome from Western lands
Thrice welcome in our hands
Ye friends of yore.
From distant home released
To mingle in glad feast
With kindred from the east
As wont before.

Let music swell the breeze
And ring from all the trees
Sweet memory’s song
Let every tongue awake
Let all that breathe partake
Let rocks their silence break
the sound prolong.

Our fathers, God, to thee
The highest praises be
To thee we song
Long may our lives be bright
Protect us by Thy might
Great God our King.

Family History, by Miss Emma Farley; Song, by Miss Gertrude Baker; Old Oaken Bucket, by David Cary; Sixty Years Ago, by Miss Nellie Ives; Dinner; After dinner there were speeches from a number of those present. The following is Dr. Davenport’s http://archiver.root...Y/2001-06/0991943526 address:

Chapter 1

And it came to pass in the reign of George and Martha, that certain tribes of the people who dwelt in many parts of the land, bethought themselves that they would leave their birth right to their brethren, and depart from the land of their fathers and go into a far off country, and make by the sweat of the brow a more noble inheritance, both to themselves and to their children.

And there was in these days a mighty wilderness, and no man kneweth the end thereof. Neither did any man dwell therein, save a few of the wandering tribes of the Gentiles called the "red man". And these did neither plant nor gather into barns; only slay a few wild beasts with the bow and arrow, for they were archers.



And now in the midst of the wilderness arose up even into the heavens an exceedingly high mountain, which was fair to look upon from the plains below, for it was covered with mighty trees even into the brow thereof. And then did roam upon this mountain many wild beasts, but the one that did most abound was one which was very fleet of foot, and did prey upon the lesser beasts of the forest, and upon the flocks of those who journeyed hither, and was called the catamount, and the region did very much abound in rocks which were the fastnesses of these beasts, and there was a cave which did reach even to the bowels of the earth in which these beasts did make their dens, and so much had they increased and multiplied that they were a terror to the coming tribes of the mountains, wherefore that place is called Catamount HIll to this day.

Chapter 2

Now the names of some of the tribes who first journeyed hither were these: Aaron, whose surname was Cary, Israel and Peter, and Amasa of the tribe of Shippee. Alden, who was also named Willis. Elihu of the tribe of Holden, and Paul, who was also called Davenport. And these said among themselves, come, let us get up and make some war upon the forests, and drive out the wild beasts, and make unto ourselves habitations.

And all the elders of the tribes said they would do so, for the thing was right in the eyes of all the people. And Aaron said unto Jemima, his wife, come, let us gather ourselves together, even from the middle of the Borough, and let us with our children travel westward, and they came and took up their abode upon the east side of the mountain.

And behold Hezekiah, whose surname was Smith, dwelt also on the east side of the mountain, even unto the entering in of the wilderness from the river. And their flocks were multiplied, for they dwelt among plants and hedges. And Peter went up and Amasa and all lsrael unto this mountain, and the tribe of Farly.

And Anan, also called Bass, went with Joseph, whose surname was Farnsworth, and they dwelt near together in the hollow according to their generations. And in those days came Paul and Alice, his wife, and they made war upon the wild beasts of the forests, and they pitched their tent and dwelt at the border thereof, where they cleared the land and had green pastures, and their flocks and herds were multiplied and they also begat children, whose names were Zacheus, Thomas and Paul, Daniel and Levi; and they also had daughters given unto them: Lydia, Sally and Alice.

And now Alice lay sick of a fever, and great fear came upon the whole household for she was nigh unto death. And Paul saddled his beast and did go for one Nathaniel, who dwelt in the valley by the river, and whose appellation was "Dr. Nat". And he came with saddlebags and he gave unto her pills of buckthorn and aloes,and the drink of herbs, queen of the meadow, motherwort and sarsaparilla, and after many days she recovered, and great rejoicing came upon all the household.

And behold Nathaniel found that she was fair to look upon, and he said, come in unto me and let us dwell together. And Alice said, I will go; and they went to dwell at the head of the meadow, in a house builded by one Artemas and Ruth. And now it came to pass after this, Joel, one of the Chiefs, and Zenas, the son of Cary, sent messengers to Nathaniel, and timbers of cedar, with masons and carpenters to build him a barn. And they builded it 40 cubits long; the stable thereof was 10 cubits, and a threshing floor 10 cubits and 20 cubits for a bay.

Chapter 3

Now it came to pass in those days, as Aaron sat in his house, that Aaron said to Jemima, his wife: "Behold, our meal getteth low, and our children hunger for bread, give unto me! I pray thee a bag that I may fill it with corn and go to the grinders". And Jemima said, go do all that is in thy heart. And Aaron arose and went. And it came to pass as he was journeying homeward from the mill, the even was come and darkness fell upon the whole land, and a great fog encompassed him about, and his way was lost. And Aaron lifted up his voice and cried aloud "Jemima! Jemima!! JEMIMA!!!"

Now Jemimah heard the cry of Aaron and answered, In here am I. But he heard her not, for her voice was weak. So she straightway took a stick and beat vehemently upon the side of the house, and Aaron hearing the sound thereof hastened homeward. Now the sons of Aaron were Zenas and Levi, but Levi died before his father and had no children. And the children of Zenas and Sally, his wife, who were of the tribe of Maxam, were these: Charlotte and Mariettie, John and George, William, David and Levi, 7 in all.

But the days of Mariettie on the earth were as a shadow, and she was not, for God took her; and Charlotte had wisdom and knowledge granted unto her, and she came in and went out before the children and taught them. And the sons of Zenas were skillful to work in stone and in timber and in tilling the land.

And behold, William was wiser than the others about bees, and the queens of Italia, and did make unto himself a great name. And David, like one of old, was a mighty man and a slayer of beasts and of cattle, and behold, the flesh thereof he did keep in markets, and with it he did feed the tribes of Aaron.

And now after many days it came to pass that Aaron and Jemima, being full of years, died. And Zenas and Sally reigned in their stead.

Chapter 4

Now Amasa, Israel and Peter were the three divisions of our tribe, who came to dwell in the hill country and they went even unto the top of the mountain and sought pastures for their flocks. Even over against the habitations of the wild beasts. And behold the house of Amasa increased greatly, and Andrus, Nancy, Jesse, Alvira and Jerusha, Henry, Chauncey, Nathan, Thankful and Kate, all these mentioned by their names, were the children of Amasa and Rhoda.

And after these days Rhoda saith unto Amasa, behold how our house has been multiplied, let us enlarge our borders, I pray thee, that there may be room in our house to dwell there. And this saying pleased Amasa and he straightway brought his cattle and his oxen, and gathered stones and timber and did build him an house, such as one as had not been there before him. He also made shingles of cedar and spruce and covered his house therewith.

Now Amasa was a man of great stature, even 5 cubits high. And Rhoda wrought fine linen and kersey, and with it did make clothes for her family and for Andrus, her first born. For behold, Rhoda was an helpmeet unto Amasa.

Now the children of Israel were Ira, Zovia, Azuba, Anan, Amasa, Catherine, Abraham, Israel, Martha and one younger called Darling. Now the children of Ira, the first born, were these: Delana, Dordana and Diana, and a son, a shepherd, who died in his youth. And Ira spake unto Dilla, his wife, to appoint their daughters to be the singers. So the daughters were appointed, and with their neighbors did often make merry with corn huskings and apple pearings [probably meant parings] with playing and dancing, making great noise with viols and with harps.

And it came to pass in these days that George took wives from the daughters of Ira, and went to dwell with Zenas, his father. And Zenas saith "Unto thee will I give the land of our fathers, even the house of Aaron, for the lot of thine inheritance" and he abode there many days. And George had exceeding much riches and honor, and he made himself treasures of silver and gold. Also storehouses for the increase of corn and stalls for all manner of beasts, and cotes for flocks, for God had given him substance very much.

And George prospered in all his works, and now sleeps with his fathers; and they buried him in the chiefest of the sepulchres of the sons of Aaron. And all the inhabitants of the hill town did him honor at his death, and Clark, his son, reigned in his stead.

And behold, Ira dwelt many years upon the mountain heights, well content with his lot. And one door of his house opened southward, and he was wont to remove his waistcoat and tarry long, even in the heat of the sun. Before his door, even near the steps thereof, the sweet-heart which Dilla had planted and watered waxed strong. And the sunflower towered high, even 6 cubits, and their fowls, their geese and their turkeys did gather in the shade thereof.

After these things it came to pass that Ira was stricken with a malady too grievous to be borne, and he died and rested with his father. And Dilla went to dwell in the house of her daughter, near the banks of the river; and in fullness of time she died. And behold, now the house of Ira was left desolate.

Chapter 5

And it came to pass in those days that Peter saw that it was not good for man to dwell alone. Now Dorcas was of the tribe of the Pikes, and Peter saw that she was fair, and he said unto her: "Dorcas, if you love me less buss [?] and they went to dwell together; and they builded them an house near the brook by the side of a rock, and nigh unto the habitations of Paul and of Levi. And lo! a mighty storm arose and it beat vehemently upon the house, but it fell not for it was founded by the rock, and darkness was upon the whole land for it was night.

And lo! while Peter and Dorcas slept, a thunderbolt descended from the heavens and did rend the house, and even the bed whereon they slept! and behold, it did divide in twain the soap trough, and did scatter the contents broadcast over the house and the children. And the dog and the swine were killed, and grat fear came upon all the household. And Peter arose and spake unto Dorcas, his wife, "Come, let us arise and give thanks unto the Lord, for he has been merciful unto us; He has saved us from the mighty judgments of the Lord".

And the next day was the Sabbath, and many people gathered in the house of the Lord, and as they went, they tarried at the house of Peter and Dorcas, and with them did offer up thankofferings [sic] that they were saved from the terrors of the thunderbolt, and He had made their lives precious in his sight. And Peter gathered with all the people in the house of the Lord, and Myres, the Elder, arose and said "The Lord hath been good unto his people; yea, He hath showed a great mercy even unto the house of Peter".

So Peter arose and sang a hymn:

"God moves in a mysterious way,
His wonders to perform
He plants his footsteps in the sea
And rides upon the storm".

And all the people said amen. And the Lord blessed Peter and his seed was multiplied: Peter, Susie, Rolly and Fanny, Annie,, Josiah, Patience, Eliza, Paul, Silas and Mila. These were his children - 11 in all.

Chapter 6

And it came to pass in those days that Daniel the prophet was joined to one of the tribe of Barnes, and her name was Patty: and Daniel was famous in his time as an expounder of the Scriptures, mighty in speech, and all the people came to hear him declare the truth on his day. And behold, he was sorely distressed, inasmuch as his substance was oftimes destroyed by fire, and desolation came upon his whole household.

And Daniel humbled himself before the God of his fathers, and the Lord favored Daniel and greatly blessed his household. And these were the sons of Daniel: David, Thomas, Alonzo, Orrie, Tirtious and Hiram; but the names of his daughters were Lucinda, Emily and Caroline. And it came to pass that these all went by themselves in families, some even to the four quarters of the earth, but David and Lucinda did abide near the house of their father.

And after these days Patty the Prophetess died, and Daniel lamented sore. But in process of time, it came to pass that Mary entered into Daniel’s house, and lo! there was restored unto him sevenfold in Mary, who was greater by far than all his former household. For since the time of the fathers there was not found the like in all the tribes of the mountain.

Chapter 7

Now it came to pass that Abraham, the son of Farnsworth, dwelt in the house of Joseph; and after many days Joseph died and Abram [sic] reigned in his stead, with Dolly, who was of the house of Holden. Now Abram was a tiller of the land, and behold, he was barefooted on the top of his head, as was also his father before him. And it came to pass that Orin was pleased with Roxy, the daughter of Abram, and he took her to wife, and they went to dwell in the house left by Nathaniel; and after many days Orin died, and Roxy tarried and reigned there.

And Riley, her brother, did dwell in the house of their father Abram. Now Dolly’s two brothers, Elihu and John, dwelt also on the south side of the mountain near the house of Anan, whose surname was Bass, and behold Anan had an impediment in his speech, and when he was old and infirm he rested from his labors; and Adna and Rebecca reigned there many years after.

Chapter 8

And it came to pass that Abram, the son of Shippee, said unto himself, Behold, I myself am a man, and I will leave even the house of my father Israel. And he married a wife from the tribe of Farley, and her name was Lucy, and they builded them an habitation and dwelt on the north side of the mountain. Now there were daughters born unto them (but behold the son shone not his face in all their household).

Fanny, Jane and Nancy, Martha, Almira and Parthena were the names of the daughters of Abraham. And it came to pass that when men did multiply on the mountains, and daughters were born unto them, that the sons saw the daughters, that they were fair, and they took them wives of all which they chose. And one, a Levite, took the firstborn of Abram; and behold all the daughters were scattered abroad. And after the death of Lucy desolation came upon the whole house. And again, after many days, Abram was joined to another and went to dwell near the plains, in an Ashfield.

Chapter 9

And it came to pass that Peter, the brother of Paul and Silas, said unto Polly, let us pitch our tent and dwell near the house of our fathers, for so it seemeth good. And now behold near by their habitation was a dense swamp, and Peter was a man of great daring, and he fain would have walked upon the surface thereof, but his faith was weak, for there was much water there.

And behold a great calamity fell upon Peter, inasmuch as his nose was divided asunder and one of his eyes were blinded by the kick of old Gilpin, and Peter was sore discouraged, and all his household; and he said unto Polly, "Come, let us journey into a far country, where peradventure we shall find greener pastures for our flocks, and a richer inheritance for our children".

And they went on their journey and Nathaniel possessed the land. And behold Nathaniel was a man of great stature and of large understandings, and he was wont to remove the coverings thereof, and to tarry long among the eels and turtles that did much abound in the meadow ditches.

Now the length of this meadow, and the breadth thereof, was exceedingly great, and in it were many islands, both great and small, covered with trees and shrubs, and with herbs; and lo, Nathaniel and Alice were wont to go out and bring in of the abundance thereof in their season; for behold Nathaniel was a disciple of Hippocrates, and was possessed of the healing art in a great degree; and he had vessels of wood and of iron in which he did compound medicines for the cure of divers maladies.

And now it came to pass when the harvest was ended, and winter drew near, Nathaniel spent the long evenings thereof making baskets of willow, and hooping the sieves which Alice did weave from hair, and did bind with the leaves of the flag. And now Robert, their firstborn, was skillful to work in brass and in iron, and to grave all manner of graving, and to find out any device that was put to him.

And lo, it came to pass that he was pierced with a chisel, and so were his days numbered. And now Nathaniel’s 4th son was called Truair, after one, a high priest, who traveled the circuit of the hill country. Now Truair did in habits much resemble his father; he was a tiller of the ground, and he bethought himself that he would journey in a far country, where he might find more fertile fields; and he bought a parcel of land where he spread his tent.

And there his possessions increased much. And it came to pass in the sixth month - the month Sivan - that he was cultivating the land, when lo, there descended upon him a thunderbolt; and he was taken up dead, and they buried him in the field of burial, in the land of strangers.

And now it came to pass that there was born unto Nathaniel a daughter, and her name was called Lydia. Now Nathaniel and Alice did set their hearts upon her, because she was their only daughter, and well favored. So Lydia dwelt in her father’s household until his death. And she did many things that were praiseworthy, for behold she was a woman zealous of good works. And after many days it came to pass that Lydia was beloved by one Emerson, of the tribe of Cary, and they dwelt henceforth with the Adamonians.

Now Ammon, Joseph, and Jason were also of the household of Nathaniel, and behold they were diligent in sowing wild oats among the rooks and the hedges, and even over the ridgepole of the houses and barns. And after they were well brushed in, it came to pass that they did leave their father’s house, and did join themselves into the society of the Odentologues. And behold they were skillful in the making of gold and silver and of ivory, and did make appliances of cunning device and workmanship, which did even eat and speak for themselves; and all the Edentulous did greatly rejoice.

So they were very diligent in repairing the crumbling incisors, bicuspids and molars, and in all that, pertained to "restoring the contour of the human face divine". And behold one went to dwell with the Gothamites, by the border of the sea; but Joseph builded him an habitation in the Norwood of the Connecticut. and lo, it came to pass, that the house of Ammon was sawn asunder, and again, after many days, it was joified and perfected; and the household of Ammon did rejoice greatly in that they did dwell in broader fields, even in the "valley view" of the winding Hoosac River.

Chapter 10

And it came to pass that Levi was a shepherd born (not made) and behold to him fell the inheritance of Paul his father, and he took up his abode there, and did build him an house of hewn logs and timber. Now the house of Levi was more comely than that of Paul, inasmuch as it was broader and higher and was divided into diverse compartments for the convenience of his family. And behold Susan was exceeding glad and said, Come now, let us build storehouses for our flocks, houses for bees, and also for our cheese.

And now Levi was a man of great cunning and he was skillful int he hiving of bees, and their swarms did greatly increase and behold their household did flow with milk and honey. Now Levi possessed lands in great abundance, and his pastures did much abound in rocks and stones, and no beast could feed thereon, save that their noses were well sharpened. So their pastures did run over with sheep and with lambs, both great and small.

And in these days it came to pass that Levi and Susan did take in abundance of the first fruits of flocks, and of cheese and of honey, and of all the increase of the fields, and the tithe of all these things brought them in abundantly, and their coffers were filled with gold and silver. And behold Levi begat great honor unto himself, inasmuch as he tarried long to possess the lands of his fathers.

Chapter 11

And it came to pass that sundry members of Amasa’s household did journey westward; and one of the daughters tarried just over the mountain, and was joined to one David whose surname was Ives. And Kate, the younger, did worship the son of Simeon the Myres, and again she was made one of the tribe of Benjamin. And behold after many days she did return to the house of her father.

Now Nathan did much resemble his father in that he was tall and of a comely countenance, and he went to dwell in the Hub, where he did dispense to the tribes thereof of the milk of human kindness.

And now Chauncey the brother of Nathan was exceeding tall, even 5 cubits and over. And it came to pass in the reign of King Winter, when he did give his snow like wood, and did scatter his ice like morsels, and his hoar frost like ashes, that one Barton did gather together all the children of the hill tribes saying: harken ye unto me, and I will dispense unto you knowledge and wisdom, and learning in great abundance.

And now much learning did make Chauncey mad, and so he did sit down heavy upon his seat, and low the teacher was sore vexed, and commanded Chauncey that he rise and sit down again. And lo, Chauncey did all that was commanded him in that he did sit down threefold heavier than before, whereupon the teacher did rend his clothes and he drew forth a raw hide and with it Chauncey was beaten with many stripes until the ire of his wrath was kindled.

And behold he leaped over the counter and seized the teacher by the throat, and held him down until he begged for his life. And behold they armed themselves with shovels and with tongs, that they might be defended against the assaults of each other, and there arose a great tumult, and all the children quaked with fear and trembling. And it came to pass that when the noise of these things went abroad, Joel, Zenas and Levi consulted together, and Mary, the daughter of Smith reigned in his stead.

And now Andros the first born of Amasa was a captain and a man of great might, in that he did brave the storms and tempests of the mountain; he was also a man of great courage and daring in that he did dwell many years nearer the lions than any of the other tribes of the mountain; even after all his father’s household had forsaken him and gone. Now Andros did search diligently among all the daughters of the hill country, but found not one who would do him honor. So he chose to dwell alone in single blessedness, and verily he shall not lose his reward.

Chapter 12

Now it came to pass in those days that Alice said unto Emily, Behold, how sin doth abound, and the love of many doth wax cold. Come, let us assemble ourselves together, there am I in their midst. So they took their hymn books and journeyed to the old school house and lighted their candle and placed it under a bushel, but on a candlestick, that it might give light unto all the house. Then after Alice had arisen from her knees they did sing an hymn. And Emily arose and said "Behold, this is the house of the Lord, let us assemble often together"; so Alice lifted up her voice and said "Amen" and they departed to their own households.

And it came to pass that the noise of these things did spread abroad throughout all the region round about. And behold all the tribes of the hill country were greatly moved and they came together by scores and by hundreds. Now Haynes, one of the elders of the people arose, and behold he was like unto Saul the son of Kish, in that he was taller by head and shoulders than the rest of the people, and he cried with a loud voice "Brethren and sisters, hearken unto me". and a great silence fell upon all the multitudes and he said "behold we are all gathered together from near and from far, let us give thanks unto the Lord, sing psalms unto his name".

Now Daniel, whose surname was Dwight, broke forth into singing:

"My chains fell off: glory! I cried
Was it for sinners Jesus died etc. etc. [sic]"

And all the people said amen and amen. And Zenas, who was greatly beloved by all the people, arose and said "Blessed be the Lord God of Israel forever and ever". And behold he did free his mind of a great burden which lay heavily upon it in that he did tell to the brethren and sisters that "he dreamed a dream; and it amounted even unto a vision". And all the people gave ear unto him, and after he had sat down behold Alice broke forth into singing:

"Oh that my load of sin were gone".

And scarcely had the voice of singing died away, when Sarah the Prophetess, the daughter of Hanshaw arose, and as she spoke a great silence fell on all the multitude for she spake of one Joel who had been suddenly taken to his death.

Now all the brethren and sisters knew and loved Joel, and they did mourn sincerely for him. And when these words sounded in their ears, their hearts were filled with sorrow; and they expressed themselves in singing mournfully. And it came to pass that Rebecca arose. Now Rebecca was a woman greatly beloved, and all the people gave ear to her as she said "It rejoiceth my heart greatly to meet with the brethren and sisters, who have come from near and from far". And when she had sat down all the people said amen.

Presently Peter arose, and his head was white and glistening, and a halo glowed around it, and his face did shine even as the light; and he blessed God with all his heart and soul; and behold, all his kinsfolk and neighbors became as lambs for quietness. But Per was greatly beloved, and when he had made an end of his sayings, he sang with a loud voice:

"On Jordan’s stormy banks I stand
And cast a wishful eye
To Canaan’s fair and happy land
Where my possessions lie".

And after this Samuel whose surname was Brown, arose and opened his mouth and said unto them "Men and brethren, it is with me as with Naaman the Syrian, when Elisha bade him go wash in Jordan; yea, more, it was as if the Jordan had been frozen over, and he had been bidden to go wash 7 times in the river. But he essayed the task, and said "Behold I have been ashamed of my brethren in the days that are past, but now do I greatly rejoice to see them zealous of good works". And Nathan, the son of Burns arose, and all the people knew that he had somewhat to say.

And Nathan said "He felt somewhat cold and lukewarm" and sat down, and all the people broke frorh into singing:

"Come Holy spirit heavenly dove
With all thy quickening powers
Kindle a flame of sacred love
In these cold hearts of ours"

And now it came to pass that Daniel the prophet arose. Now behold he was a prophet born (not made) and when the spirit seizeth him, the voice of Daniel was like the balm of Gilead, even like precious ointment upon their heads, that ran down upon the beard; even Aaron’s beard that went down to the skirts of his garments.

Now after this it came to pass that the hour was late and Myres the elder arose, and behold he was halt, and like Samson of old his locks were long and flowing. And he said "My brethren and sisters, if any man does ought to his neighbor, he must go to him and make restitution, or he can never enter into the pearly gates of the New Jerusalem". and all the people said amen and amen.

Now what shall I say more, for the time would fail me, to speak of Sister Farley and others who through faith wrought righteousness and obtained the promise. So after they had sung an hymn, they all departed and slept. And as for the rest of the doings of the tribes, are they not all written in the chronicles of our memory?
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Ashfield (MA), Barber / Hair, Beverages, Birds, Births, Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Cemeteries, Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Connecticut, Cosmetics, Dance, Diseases, Dreams / Sleep, Education, Emigration and Immigration, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
The Belchertown tragedy

Of course the death of Nettie Barrett, aged 17, by her own hand at Belchertown, and the narrow escape of her companion, Frances S. Bridgman, 14 years old, from a like fate, have created the profoundest sensation in that quiet community’, and the funeral of the former at the Methodist Church Sun. was largely attended. Indeed the whole affair is such a strangely sad one that there is a wide interest to learn all possible particulars concerning it.

The girls were bright and attractive, belonging to the higher village circles. Miss Barrett was sent to Belchertown last April by her mother, who lives at south Amherst, to continue her education, and was to have been examined for the High School Sat., and baptized Sun. in the Church which witnessed her burial; and Miss Bridgman, who had been her almost constant companion of late, was the adopted daughter of Calvin Bridgman.

Miss Barrett had the reputation of being a rather wild person, and the girls were in the habit of being out late nights. Miss Barrett was the leader, and her conduct had become so notorious that her guardian, Franklin Dickinson, had a serious talk with her Thurs. on her behavior. When she returned that eve., she remarked to Mrs. Daniel Packard, with whom she was stopping, that they "wouldn’t be troubled with her being out any more nights".

At 8 o’clock, she and Miss Bridgman - who had been secreted in the room - were observed by neighbors to leave the house. They procured the fatal morphine at the drug store of Mr. Barnes, the elder, a few days before, they had unsuccessfully undertaken to get the poison of the son, who refused to give it without a prescription. Mr. Barnes claims that he supposed it was for Calvin Bridgman. At what time and how the girls got into Packard’s house again is not known.

About half past 7 o’clock Fri. morning, Mrs. Owen, with whom Frances Bridgman was boarding during her parent’s absence, came over in the greatest alarm about her, saying that the night before the girl had left, after bidding them a tearful farewell. Mrs. Packard went immediately to the room and there the victims lay, one in a deadly stupor and the other writhing in terrible agony.

The bed was covered with candy, and Miss Bridgman explained that they had overeaten of this. Efforts were made to revive Miss Barrett, who refused to take anything but cold water, and then determinedly said "Go away, I want to sleep". When Mrs. Packard had left the room for help, Miss Bridgman hailed a little girl and threw down this note, written in a confused, uncertain hand, and unsigned:

"Mr. Barnes - will you be so kind as to send me as much chloroform as here is money enough, five cents’ worth?"

She threw down also two letters directed to George T. Slauter, Belchertown, and Wilbur F. Nichols, at Wilbraham Academy, bidding them farewell and asking them to act as bearers. Then followed an exciting scene in the little bedroom Poor Nettie Barrett was dying. Miss Bridgman confessed that they had taken the morphine, that the candy was only a ruse, that there had been scandalous stories in the town about them, that she did not wish ever to see her parents again, and hoped and expected to die.

She quietly watched her dying companion and waited for the expected chloroform. With the death of Miss Barrett however, came the desire to live, and she requested salt and water to enable her to vomit more.

The wonderful nerve and mingled frankness and cunning of these little misses as displayed during the whole affair, are brought out by the scenes immediately preceding the tragedy. Only 5 hours before they entered the little bed room, they gayly played croquet with some young people, holding in their hands the candy which they were to sprinkle on the bed.

Miss Bridgman wrote what she thought was her last letter to her father, in simple, affectionate, yet determined words. She would meet her parents in a world where there were no scandalous tongues, and where they could live in peace.

[Now don’t ask me how I got there, but I believe that Frances S. Bridgman is actually Emma Francis Bridgman, daughter of Franklin A. Bridgman, born in 1860].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Beverages, Children, Dreams / Sleep, Drug Abuse, Drugstores / Drugs, Economics, Education, Family, Food, Furniture, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Households, Literature / Web Pages, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Orphans and Orphanages, Poisoning, Religion, Rich People, Scandals, Suicide, Women, Words, Water

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Mrs. Betsy Straw

Mrs. Betsy Straw of Warner, N.H., a relative of ex Gov. Straw, who lacks only 2 months of being 101 years old, is knitting a pair of white worsted stockings for A.T. Stewart of New York, and another pair for Dr. Lambert of the same city.
 

Subjects: Family, Government, New Hampshire, Old Age, Rich People, Stewarts, Stores, Retail, Women, Work, Clothing

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Charlemont

(Charlemont) The new County Road near the depot, leading toward West Hawley, is fast being completed, but not in a manner satisfactory to the voters and tax payers or the traveling public. This road has been twice crowded from its first and excellent location by the change of the railroad bed. The last change now going on by the State, locates the road over a spur of Mt. Peck, making a cut through a ledge, which should have been cut away so as to leave a tolerable grade for the new road; but instead the grade has been increased very much, and the fill each way is made of material very liable to wash, making the expense for necessary repairs hereafter by the town very great, far in excess of what it would have been on the old route.

It is important that the town see to it that no such burden of future expense be cast upon them by the State, which is amply able to bear the expense of making good all highways upon which it encroaches, and any board of officers whose duty it is to decide upon the merits of this road, will do great injustice to the town if they accept of it completed or the State now decides upon. The town ask nothing but justice and will see to it that no great injustice is done the overtaxed town of Charlemont by the rich Commonwealth.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Economics, Government, Massachusetts, Rich People, Roads, Trains, Transportation, Work, Hawley (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News of the week

Col. Wheeler, a wealthy cattle dealer of Texas, was recently killed by a party of cattle thieves who had run off some 500 of his cattle.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Crime, Criminals, Murder, Rich People, Robbers and Outlaws

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 12, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
News of the week

The details of a brutal and long continued case of assault have just come to light in Philadelphia. A well known and wealthy married man named John L. Kates, some years ago, seduced a 15 year old girl named Pemberton, and has held her in a life of semi-slavery ever since. Recently she attended a picnic without permission, and when she returned, he charged her with infidelity, knocked her down, beat her in a brutal manner, and then tearing all the clothes off her, poured burning fluid all over her, and set fire to her with the fiendish purpose to burn her alive.

The interference of some people in the house alone prevented the consummation of his design. On Fri. eve. last, he again whipped her in a brutal manner and swore he would disfigure her so she would never be able to go out. Tues. the neighbors complained of him, and he was arrested and held in $2200 bail for appearance at court.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Economics, Fires, Households, Marriage and Elopement, Police, Prisons, Rich People, Seduction, Sex Crimes, Work, Clothing

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Packed for the other world



A defunct Celestial was yesterday packed and ticketed through to China heaven by Mr. Wilson, the undertaker. The receptacle for the body was a costly casket, for that pendant pigtail had swung from a "way up" head during life. Around the body was packed an abundance of little pieces of paper, all spotted with gold, such as are seen scattered along the way when the defunct Mongolians are carried to the grave. These pretties are very glittering, and easily blown about by the wind, and are to attract the attention of the Chinese devils and give the deceased an opportunity to escape while his tormentors are in pursuit of them.

The remaining emptiness of the casket was filled with pork, rice, chicken, candies, etc., upon which the dear departed is expected to feed while journeying to the unknown. He was also abundantly supplied with Chinese coins with which to defray the expenses of the journey. In his mouth was placed a United States ten cent piece, to show that he came from a land of civilization, and as a passport to better seats and society over there. Lastly he had a fan placed in his hand to cool his heated brow, and as a badge of high rank in the land of his earthly nativity. With all this preparation he is expected to make a rapid and safe journey to the "Land of the Leal" and a triumphant entry into Kingdom Come (Virginia (Nev.) Enterprise.
 

Subjects: Barber / Hair, Cemeteries, Chinese, Economics, Food, Literature / Web Pages, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Racism, Religion, Rich People, Transportation, Weather, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Hampshire / Hampden Counties

Ithamar F. Conkey of Amherst, Register of Insolvency in the 9th district, died suddenly on Sun. morning, 8th, and died at early morning. He was at Northampton on Sat., holding an insolvent court in the court room, and in the aft. was taken with a severe pain to the chest. After reclining awhile on a settee in one of the jury rooms, he walked down the stairs and was taken in a hack to the Fitch House. Dr. A.W. Thompson was in to see him, and he gave him an injection of morphine, which seemed to quiet the pain. He fell asleep and at about 6 o'clock was taken to Amherst in a buggy.

He seemed to rally from the first attack, but during the night another attack seized him. Dr. Fish was called, who administered morphine, but he did not revive again. He was a native of Amherst, being a son of Ithamar Conkey, formerly a prominent lawyer there, and studied law with the late Edward Dickinson, after taking a partial course at Amherst college. In 1852 he was elected to the Legislature, and being subsequently identified with the Know Nothing movement, was elected District Attorney.

He has since been more conspicuous as a lawyer than a politician, but has held numerous town offices. He leaves a wife, a son and two daughters. Mr. C. was aged 52. He leaves a property valued at $60,000 or $70,000. The funeral services Wed. aft. were notable in the large number of distinguished people gathered in the pouring rain to attend them, as in their rare impressiveness.

Preceding the church exercises was an affecting scene at the Amherst house, the baptism and christening of Mr. Conkey's only grandchild, the infant son of his eldest daughter and F.A. Lane of New Haven by Rector Allen as Francis Conkey Lane. The baptismal font was placed upon the coffin, the mother and family kneeling about it. Meantime, Grace Church had become filled to overflowing, many being unable to obtain entrance; long before the appointed hour the village people - business being suspended in honor to the town's most prominent citizen - including most of the faculty of both colleges, had gathered, while every train up to 3 o'clock brought friends of the deceased...

The church was exquisitely decorated. Mr. Conkey's pew was draped, and on the casket was a white cross and crown. The pall bearers for the Hampshire bar were D.W. Bond, Charles Delano, and Judge Spaulding of Northampton, and William A. Dickinson of Amherst; and for the school committee, E.A. Thomas and Dr. Edward Hitchcock.


 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Business Enterprises, Cemeteries, Children, Connecticut, Courts, Economics, Education, Elections, Family, Furniture, Government, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Horses, Hotels, Law and Lawyers, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Medicine / Hospitals, Mourning Customs, Names, Obituaries, Religion, Rich People, Transportation

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Richest woman

The richest woman in America is the wife of Prof. Gammel [Elizabeth Avery Ives Gammell, daughter of Robert Hale Ives], formerly of Brown University, R.I. She has an income of at least a million a year, her father's estate, which she has just inherited, being estimated at fully $20,000,000.

http://www.rihs.org/mssinv/Mss509.HTM
 

Subjects: Economics, Education, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Rich People, Women

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Deep mourning



Mrs. B.F. Johnson of Vincennes, Ind. is in deep mourning for 2 uncles who have left her $3,000,000. [Pretty snide, I'd say].
 

Subjects: Economics, Family, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Rich People, Women

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 2, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Turners Falls

It is said that President Field of the Russell Company intends, hereafter, to reside in Lowell with his family, giving general superintendence of the cutlery company, but spending most of his time on other business in which he is interested.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Cutlery, Family, Massachusetts, Montague (MA), Rich People, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 21, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Lady Jane Franklin

Obituary.
 

Subjects: Explorers, Obituaries, Rich People, Widows and Widowers, Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 21, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
A New Jersey girl sells herself for $15,000

A somewhat eccentric though wealthy gentleman named Gates has recently been creating quite a sensation in and about Somerville. He is well advanced in years, being upward of 70, a widower and a cripple, with one married daughter, an only child. He moved into Hillsborough township over a year ago, and bought considerable real estate, giving one farm to his daughter.

He is said to have been quite lavish with his money - to such an extent that his family became alarmed, and an effort was made by his daughter to have him declared insane and placed under guardianship, but this effort proved a failure. Among other eccentricities was his evident fondness for the society of young ladies.

On the 5th of July he became acquainted with a young lady from the West, who, with her mother, was temporarily staying in Somerville, and who is not yet out of her teens, to whom he made proposals of marriage. The girl took one hour to consider the matter, and then signified her acceptance, although it is said against the wishes of her mother, and on Mon. of last week the parties were united in marriage, the ceremony taking place in Plainfield - the mother in the mean time having become reconciled. Fifteen thousand dollars was the marriage portion of the bride, which sum was at once placed at her disposal.

[Read the sequel of the life of Joshua B. Gates at the New York Times Online Index of May 29, 1877, entitled "Story of an old man’s marriage" and that of May 30, 1877, entitled "Joshua B. Gates’ marriage: his young widow’s claim for dower; her side of the story; Gates’ alleged cruelty; the divorce proceedings"].
 

Subjects: Businesspeople, Courtship, Divorce, Economics, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Handicapped, Insanity, Literature / Web Pages, Marriage and Elopement, Old Age, Rich People, Vendors and Purchasers, Widows and Widowers, Women

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Foreign

Foreign gossip says, the young Marquis of Lorne has a forlorn time of it among his royal wife's relatives. The young princes snub him as a subject, and his German brother-in-law, the heir to the Kaiser's crown, does likewise. On a recent visit to this prince, while his wife was admitted to the imperial circle of Berlin, poor Lorne was "left to cool his heels among the nobility outside"; and at a recent garden party in London, he was peremptorily directed by an equerry of his brother-in-law, the heir apparent, to leave the royal tent, which he had entered without special invitation.



[See John Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll, in Wikipedia]
 

Subjects: English (and England), Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Gays, Germans, Parties, Rich People, Royalty, Women, Europe, Canada

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
News of the week

A man named Baker, a Providence painter about 40 years old, was arrested at Oak Bluffs, Martha's Vineyard a few days ago, for attempting to outrage several little girls, daughters of summer residents, but as the parents did not wish to give publicity to the matter, he was allowed to go on condition of leaving the State.
 

Subjects: Art, Child Abuse, Children, Crime, Criminals, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Massachusetts, Police, Rape, Rich People, Sex Crimes, Vacations, Work

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Mrs. Paran Stevens

Mrs. Paran Stevens of Boston recently had $50,000 worth of jewels stolen from her in London, by a French maid.

[A very interesting article about her appears in the New York Times online index of April 4, 1895].
 

Subjects: Boston (MA), Crime, Criminals, Economics, English (and England), French, Literature / Web Pages, Rich People, Robbers and Outlaws, Widows and Widowers, Women, Work, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 14, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Franklin County tax payers

Greenfield - no. of polls, 927; in 1874, 929; valuation of personal property, 1875, $853,973; in 1874, $828,853; valuation of real estate, 1875, $1,969,665; in 1874, $1,954,790; total valuation, 1875, $2,823,638; in 1874, $2,783,653; rate, 1875, $14.50 per thousand; 1874, $13.50 per thousand.

The following is a list of persons who pay a tax of $25 and upwards, not including fire district tax, which will be about $3 on $1000.

Abell, George A., $41.15
Austin, Thomas N., $33.90
Adams, George C., $87.70
Adams, Peleg, $360.50
Adams, John A., $85.52
Amidon, J.H., $26.65
Avery estate, $30.45
Allen, William H., $89
Allen, F.R., $89
Allen, S’s Sons, $304.50
Allen, George A., $44.05
Allen, Quintas, $83.20
Allen, John S. & Son, $44.82
Arms, George A., $413.80
Arms, Elihu G., $46.95
Aiken, David, $65.80
Ames, James M., $129.75
Ames, James M., trustee, $87
Ames, George, $33.90
Alexander, A.A., $38.83

Bryant, Chauncey, $29.53
Black, Nathaniel, $25.64
Breck, S.P. & son, $71.60
Browning, Anson, $46.95
Briggs, Samuel, $38.98
Breen, John, $36.80
Blake, E.B., $31
Bryant & Miner, $43.50
Brackett, H.W., $31.36
Brown, Harriet, estate, no amount listed
Bouker, Henry, $35.35
Beals, Joseph, $68.70
Bascom, Abner N., $46.59
Bascom, Chester A., $52.67
Billings, Henry F., $60.20
Bullard, A.C., $71
Bullard, Willard, $62.51
Bullard, Silas, $88.28
Barney, Edward, $109
Briggs, Henry D., $33.10
Barton, Lyman G., $183.44
Ballou, Perley & sons, $123.81
Bass, O.H., $39 (I’m rounding off the cents from hereon in)
Burnham, F.L., $28
Bird, Julia, $145
Benton, Edward, $93
Butler, Calvin L., $52
Bangs, J.C., $44

Colle, Mary, $58
Coombs, Mrs. Walter, $114
Carll, J.L., $38
Chapin, Caleb, $45
Chapin, John, $34
Chapin, Julius E., $58
Chapin, David G., $45
Cushman, Mrs. H.W., $50
Chapman, Matthew, $171
Chapman, Frank R., $74
Cohn, Charles, $31
Comstock, W.O., $67
Conant, C.C., $60
Clark, A.S., $40
Childs, M.M., $68
Carpenter, Ira, $61
Coller, D.F., $48
Cook, R.W., $82
Clapp, Mrs. Anna C., $37
Clapp, Frederick, $62
Clapp, H.W. estate, $307
Conn. RR Co., $261
Cong’l. Society, 2nd, $47
Cleveland, Edward, $31

Deane, Alice & sister, $87
Deane, Dr. A.C., $102
Deane, & Wright, $29
Deane, Daniel L., $35
Day, William J., $36
Dodge, Charles F., $45
Davis, W.T., $132
Davis, Henry J., $43
Draper, W.W., $35
Daniels, W.C., $31
Doolittle, George, $729
Dunkley, Edward, $28
DeWolf, Austin, $96
Dwyer, John, $25

Eddy, George S., $80
Embury, H.C., $28
Eagan, Jerry, $33
Elliot, William, $48
Eastman, S.S., $105
Eastman, S.S. & Co., $131
Episcopal Society, $65

Farrell, Lewis, $36
Fisk, Dr. Charles L., $53
Fitzgerald, P.M., $60
Fitzgerald, John, $70
Field, F.E., $31
Farnsworth & Persons, $30
Field, Albert A., $29
Field, Charles R., $183
Field, & Hall, $29
Forbes, William A., $119
Fuller, Mrs. H.M., $36
Frary, George W. $115
Forbes & Foster, $6
Fellows, M.S., $78
Felton, J.P., $99
Field, Mrs. A.R., $75
First National Bank, $174 (had Nirst)
Franklin County National Bank, $362

Grennell, George, $212 (also seen as Grinnell)
Graves, John J., $45
Graves, Luther L., $35
Graves, Mrs. J.M., $31
Graves, Alonzo, $89
Gascouigne, J.F., $49
Griswold, W., estate, $40
Griswold, Duloie, g’d’n, $108
Griswold J.F., $83
Gunn, Levi J., $66
Greenfield Tool Co., $420

Henry, Benjamin, $45
Henry, Nathan F., $130
Henry, Charles, $35
Henry, & Smead, $38
Hagar, F.S., $67
Haskell, C.C., $28
Hunter, David, $45
Harris, H.C., $31
Haywood, L.M., $31
Hosmer, F.J., guardian, $62
Haywood, Mrs. G.P., $78
Horr, John, $42
Holcomb, Alfred, $29
Hall, E.A., $32
Hall, S.W., $75
Howland, Rufus, $183
Hall, T.V., $30
Hollister, J.H., $375
Hovey, Dr. Daniel, estate, $224
Hovey, George H., $425
HItchcock, A.C., $31
Hawks, Frederick, $57
Handforth, Henry, $50
Hull, A.N., $41

Jackson, Andrew, $31
Jackson, Mrs. O.M., $56
Joslyn & Kimball, $101
Jones, O.M., $30
Jones, Ed J., $144
Jones, Dennis W., $64

Kennedy, John, $33
Kelliher, Dennis, $36
Kellogg, Bela, $56
Kellogg, Bela & Co., $48
Keith, Charles, $88
Keuran, H.E., $73
Keith, William, $141
Kelley, F.B. & F.S., $85

Lamb, J.H., $48
Lamb, Samuel O., $93
Lamb, Samuel O., agent, $29
Lamb, Samuel O., Ex’r., J. Miles estate, $92
Lamb, Samuel O., Ex’r., F.B. Russell, $203
Lamb, Samuel O., Treasurer, Greenfield Gas Co., $174
Lawrence, Royal, $31
Loomis, Rev. A.G., $64
Leonard, Mrs. Theo, $91
Lyons, J.L., $210
Lyons, David, $26
Lyons, Samuel J., $33
Lyons, Charles D., $26
Long, Lemuel H., $60
Leavitt, Miss Mary, $65
Lowell, Charles R., $60
Leighton, C.W., $54
Leonard, Horatio, $29
Lander, Ben D., $29
Lyman, E.E., $44
Larrabee, Eber X., $91

Moody, Mrs. Fannie, $36
Miller, J.W., $60
Miller, H.L., $64
McClure, Manly, $68
Murdock, Charles A., $26
Merriam, E.D., $74
McFarland, John, $67
Miner, A.G., $48
Moore, Mrs. Oramel, estate, $43
Moore & Withey, $73
Moore, J.W. & Son, $101
McClellan, C.H., $118
Maxwell, S.S., $76
Methodist Society, $58
Maynard, Gilbert, $35
Moors, John F., $73
Munn, Charles H., $52
Martin, Frank E., $53
Munson, J.M., $252
Martindale, P.D., $122
Megrath, A.W., $52

Nash, Lyman & Son, $114
Noyes, B.B., $29
Noyes, B.B. & Co., $100
Nichols, John, $32
Newhall, Albert, $29
Newhall, Mrs. Mary, $58
Newton, James, $285
Newton, Joseph D., $133
Newton, John S., $113
Newton, H.C. & son, $97
Newton, Seth, $64
Nims, Lucius & Son, $224
Nims, Charles T., $95
Nims, William M., $82
Nash, E.Q., $142

Owen, Euclid, $129
Osgood, J.W.D., $163
Osbon, E.H., $29
Osterhout, John, $55
Osgood, E. and son, $53

Parker, Alonzo, $118
Parker, B.S., $54
Phillips, Simeon, $33
Phelps, John C., $31
Phillips, Rufus, $64
Phillips, N.P. & Son, $52
Potter & Stearns, $27
Potter, George W., $130
Potter & Nash, $161
Potter, William, $133
Potter, Warren J., $100
Pierce, George, $32
Pierce, George Jr., $38
Pierce & Austin, $68
Pierce & Co., $54
Pierce, J.J. & Sons, $233
Pierce, J.J. & Others, $87
Pratt, F.J., $93
Pratt, Stephen L., $41
Payne, H.B. & S.W., $95
Prichard, R.S., $28
Porter, James, $57
Porter, Pliny, $27
Parmenter, E.A., $116
Prentiss, H.H., $29
Phelps, Ansel estate, $389
Packard, R.A., $89
Pine, William, $42
Pond, Mary, $410
Pond, Frank A., $63
Pierce, M.R. & N.G., $44
Pierce, M.R., $33
Pierce, N.G., $29
Pickett, Job G., $48
Potter, E. Turner, $77

Richardson, J.J., $129
Richardson, J.B., $45
Richmond, Charles, $39
Reed, Charles N., $39
Root, Spencer B., $229
Root, W.F., $91
Root, T.D. estate, $63
Russell, J., estate, $488
Russell, Nathaniel E., $413
Rice, Mrs. L.W., $29
Robinson, James, $31
Reed, Kate & H., $36
Rowley, Joseph Jr., $28
Ripley, Thomas H., $31
Riley, Samuel, $36
Riddell, J.W., $218
Root, Cephas estate, $34
Russell, John, $57

Simons, D.S., $438
Sheldon, Henry, $28
Sheldon, John, $38
Spear, Daniel W., $112
Sauter, Gotleib, $70
Sprague, Peter T., $31
Smead, William M., $74
Smead, William, $50
Smead, Charles L., $94
Smead, S.A., estate, $105
Sawtell, Lyman, $25
Shaw, D.G., $42
Spring, J.C., $45
Stratton, E.A., $35
Stratton, C.M., $60
Strecker, Edward, $168
Sparhawk, Mrs. L.B., $36
Stone, L.H., $45
Stearns, John H., $33
Stones, Mrs. H. & A., $37
Stevens, Mrs. H., $65
Stimpson, W.A., $28
Seward & Willard, $116
Sammis, D.L., $120
Severance, Dr. W.S., $69
Severance, P.P., $144
Sessler, Jacob, $34
Stickney, William, $78
Sanderson, J.S., $123
Snow, Barnabas, $54
Snow, Newell, $67
Snow & Felton, $58
Slate, S.B., $69
Sawyer, Benjamin, $28
Smith, L.T., $44
Smith, Elijah W., $69
Smith, F.G., $72
Smith, Preserved, $52
Shattuck, S.L., $121
Shattuck & Co., $108
Smead, C.W., $72
Salisbury, George E., $54

Thompson, J.W., $26
Thompson, F.M., $41
Tyler, C.H., $28
Tyler, Major H., $46
Tyler, H.H., $52
Traver, Phillip, $60
Thayer, A.T. estate, $34

Washburn, W.B., $509
Woods, Hopkins, $53
Wells, Frank, $35
Wells, Edward, $25
Woodard, Mrs. E.G., $47
Woodard, H.G., $133
Wilson, Joel, $212
Wilby, George, $26
Williams, G.D., $41
Williams, G.D., trustee, $104
Wade, T.S., $74
Wade & Corbett, $36
Wiley, Robert, $103
Wiley, Solon L., $103
Wiley, Oren, $95
Womersley, Dr. T., $41
Wait, Thomas, $104
Wait, Lyman J., $31
Wise, Willard A., $27
Walker, Dr. A.C., $78
Wells, N.S., $52
Wells, C.B., $42
Wise, William M., $102
Wright, A.H., $125
Wiliams, Misses, $36
Ward, Mrs. E.V., $87
Ward, Mrs. E.V., guardian, $58
Wheeler, S.S., $54
Wunsch, William, $96
Wood, Seth, $39
Warner, A.K., $52
Warner Mfg. Co., $73
Zeiner, John L., $28

Non-residents

Adams, Amos, Montague, $116
Botsford, Mrs. Lizzie A., Boston, $145
Bardwell, O.O., Shelburne, $26
Conant, Mrs. S.T., Newark, N.J., $40
Couillard, Henry, Shelburne, $43
Coleman, Matthew, Springfield, $40
Dickinson, Caleb, estate, Hatfield, $33
Fisk, D.O., Shelburne, $60
Goss, R.L., Montague, $79
Hopkins, W.S.B., Worcester, $58
Hale, Israel P., Bernardston, $31
Long, Alanson, Boston, $51
Merriam, Charles, Springfield, $72
Pierce, Samuel R., Turners Falls, $53
Schwartz, Louis B., Boston, $166
Sage, O.W., Cazenovia, N.Y., $28
Sanborn, W.H., New Haven, $268
Smith Charities, Northampton, $1700
Slate, Charles, Shelburne, $34
Sanderson, John, Bernardston, $72
Thompson, Charles, Conn., $31
Temple, Philo, Deerfield, $27
Todd, Cynthia, Leyden, $27
Turners Falls Company, $290
Wells, D. & H., Shelburne, $53
Williams, Bishop, Boston, $29.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Charity, Connecticut, Connecticut River, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Family, Fires, Government, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Montague (MA), Names, Natural Resources, Orphans and Orphanages, Religion, Rich People, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Stores, Retail, Sunderland (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Spencer B. Root and Frank J. Pratt leave town today for a 6 or 8 weeks' "roughing it" in the Rocky Mountains west of Colorado. They leave the Pacific Railroad at Denver, and with pack mules follow a trail into the Indian country. [Ah, this link shows that both Root and Pratt were buying up mining land, and their descendants are still profiting from it to this day! See http://www.ewg.org/m...w.php?cust_id=365923 ].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Family, Greenfield (MA), Masculinity (Machismo), Mines and Mineral Resources, Native Americans, Rich People, Trains, Vacations


Powered by manager.webworksserver.com