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Apr 13, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Poor

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Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Coleraine Murder

The Coleraine Murder - As briefly stated in our last issue, Daniel Dwight, supposed to be one of the murderers of Joseph R. Farnsworth, was arrested Sat. night at the door of his father’s house on Catamount Hill, Coleraine, where he had come 5 days after the murder. There were 6 men, under Deputy Sheriff John Gould, stationed around the house, and between 10 and 11 o’clock, they saw a man coming up the road, which proved to be young Dwight.

They allowed him to approach near the house, when a signal was given, and they stepped from their hiding places. Dwight ran around the house in the direction of the barn, but he was then surrounded and forced to surrender. When taken into the house before his father, he fainted.

Dwight was confined in the lock-up at Shelburne Falls, and on Mon., Trial Justice Brainard of Greenfield held a court at the office of H.M.Puffer, Esq., and had the young man brought before him. A large gathering of people were in attendance, and among them Dwight’s wife, father and mother.

He pleaded not guilty, and the magistrate, without having a hearing of evidence, arraigned him on the charge of murder and continued the case to Mon. the 17th. Officers Swan and Gould then brought the prisoner to Greenfield,where he is now confined in jail. Dwight appears quite calm and is not disposed to talk much about the affair. He accounts for his absence and his whereabouts during the 4 days as follows:

"I had some trouble with my wife on Tues. aft., which had ended by my saying I was going off, and her replying that she hoped I would, and what was more, that I would stay away. She then started to go to father’s house, which is only a short distance from mine, and I started for a pasture where some of father’s cattle were grazing.

On the way I met Herbert Davenport, and together we went to Farnsworth’s house, and afterward went down the lane to the road leading to Shelburne Falls. Herbert wanted a cane, so we stopped and cut one, I bending the tree over while he cut it; but he did not carry it long before he threw it away.

From there we went through the fields directly to my house, where I changed my clothes and gave a suit to Herbert, as his were all patched and dirty. We left home about 5 o’clock, and went down the mountain to Heath, and then through Hartwellville down to North Adams, getting there on Wed. aft.

We walked all Tues. night.Wed. night we slept on the hills near North Adams, and on Thurs. morning, after staying a while in North Adams, we walked to Pownal on the railroad track. At Pownal we got on board a train which was returning with the firemen from the muster at North Adams that day.

At Petersburg Junction Herbert got left with some Salem, N.Y. firemen, because the train started so quick, and I could not get off, it was going so fast. That night I stopped at Greenwich, N.Y. and registered my name in the hotel book in full - Daniel J. Dwight, Coleraine, Mass. I remained there that night, but had nothing to eat, as I only had money enough to pay for my lodging.

[For more information on this area, see the Internet Archive’s "Williamstown, the Berkshire Hills, and thereabout"]

The next day I walked to Troy. I did not remain there long because I was hungry and sick, and thought I would go right home and go to work for father, and let my wife do as she chose. Coming back I got a ride part of the way on a freight train, and got to N. Adams Sat. aft.,and walked to central shaft in the tunnel, and from there I rode to the east end on the workmen’s train and walked to Zoar, where they let me ride on a hand car to Charlemont. From there I rode with a Mr.Wells as far as his house, and then went across the fields home".



A portion of Dwight’s story has proved to be true. Bradley Davenport and Wesley Woodard, sent to Petersburg Junction, sent back that two men answering the description of Dwight and Davenport had been there. At Greenwich, N.Y., Dwight’s name was found registered in full, as he had said, and there is nothing to show that Davenport was with him at the time.

The Davenport boy arrested - Search was continued for Davenport and finally he was tracked to Williamstown, and Thurs. aft. was found there by a Mr. White. He made no efforts to escape, but on the other hand seemed glad to give himself up.

He was brought through the tunnel to Shelburne Falls Fri. morning, and Trial Justice Brainard of Greenfield held a preliminary trial, arraigned him for murder, and continued the trial until the 27th. The Davenport boy’s narrative is substantially the same as that given by Dwight, but he does not deny that they killed Farnsworth.

He says their only object was to obtain money, that he had no enmity or ill will towards the murdered man. He and Dwight had made up their minds to go West and hoped to get enough money from Farnsworth to pay their expenses, but he says they only got about $4.

There were 2 sticks cut, he says, a walnut and a maple. It was with the latter that Farnsworth was knocked down. He says that he did not do the striking, though he was there. After he was left at Petersburg Junction, he wandered from place to place, working for something to eat when he could get employment, and was endeavoring to get back home.

Davenport is not of ordinary intelligence. He was dull at school, and has since been lazy and shiftless. Want of mental responsibility will be entered as a plea in his behalf. His mother says that he has always been a "strange boy". She has another son and a daughter who are bright, active and industrious.

Davenport was brought to Greenfield and lodged in jail on Fri. by Deputy Sheriff Swan. Both boys, who are allowed to be together when not locked in their cells, do not appear to be cast down or afflicted much with remorse. They will be brought before the Grand Jury at the November Court and if bills are found against them the trial will be before a special session of the Supreme Court.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Diseases, Economics, Education, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Food, Greenfield (MA), Handicapped, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Hotels, Households, Juvenile Delinquents, Marriage and Elopement, Missing Persons, Murder, Names, Police

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 21, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Court record

Court record - The fifth week of the Superior Court continued the business of the term, beginning Tues. with the following trials before the court:

John O’Donnell vs. Bartholomew Reardon & Trustees - Finding for the plaintiff, amount $68.68, and the charging of the Trustee (the Keith Paper Co.) with $76.07...Erastus Cowles vs. Edwin A. Ball - This was an action of trespass, wherein the plaintiff alleged that the defendant, who, being a highway surveyor, had, in repairing the highway on Deerfield Meadow, trespassed upon the plaintiff’s land, plowing into the Broughton Pond road, a turf embankment some 3 ft. wide and 68 rods in length.

Also, by removing a stone at the western terminus of the road. The question at issue being the true location of the northern line of said road. The defendant claimed that he had not exceeded the original limits of the road, which was laid out in 1796. The case developed the fact that the race of old men were not yet extinct, and the remembrances of the greater portion of Deerfield were required on the pros and cons of the matter in dispute. Finding for the defendant...

Henry Couillard vs. Elihu Smead - This was an action by the plaintiff, as tax collector of Shelburne, to recover $33.85, being a tax assessed in 1871. The defendant claimed that the tax had already been paid by J.B. Whitney, who, acting as his agent, handed the plaintiff the money in the yard of his livery stable at Shelburne Falls, and moreover, fixed the date as Apr. 29, 1871.

The circumstances attending the alleged payment were detailed by Mr. Whitney, while the plaintiff, while testifying that at the date named he was at Winchester N.H., engaged in the joint occupation of "courting a woman and trading horses", succeeded in raising an issue of fact, which, after a subsequent attempt by the plaintiff’s side to show the true status of the witness Whitney, for truth and veracity, and the counter attempt of the defense to discredit Couillard on the same ground; the truth might be said to indeed be "trembling in the balance". Finding for the plaintiff, amount $40.78...

The inhabitants of Leverett vs. the inhabitants of Rowe - This was an action to recover for money expended by the town of Leverett in assisting a pauper by the name of Rice, and whom it was claimed, had a legal settlement in the town of Rowe. The circumstances of the case were quite peculiar. One of the ways by which a person gains a settlement in a town is by the possession and residence on an estate of freehold for 3 years.

A settlement once gained of course continuing until a new one is gained elsewhere. In this case, Mr. Rice owned and lived upon a place in Rowe, but a few days previous to the expiration of 3 years he returned the deed of land to the original grantor, who then conveyed the property to a new party. Mr. Rice continued to live upon the land for some few weeks after giving up the deed as mentioned.

The new party who took the property did not take possession; neither did the original grantor exercise any act of ownership except the mere transferring of the deeds till after the expiration of 3 years. The question arises whether the fact of giving the deed back by Rice to his grantor, did moderate the circumstances, divest Rice of his seizin of the freehold. If not, of course he gained a settlement; while if the residence or the seizin were cut short by a few days, the statute would not be complied with and the town would not be liable. The point raised was so peculiar that the Judge reserved his decision...

Lucius Smith vs. Austin Drake, appt. The case came up on appeal from a magistrate’s findings. The court found for the plaintiff and assessed damages of $7.42...

The following cases were disposed of by judgment without trial: Samuel B. Fletcher vs. Henry Herring - This case has stood upon the docket for a long time, having been tried by a jury in 1873. It was settled on agreement by a verdict for the plaintiff, amount $19...Moses Stebbins vs. Jasper Gillett - This was another of the old cases consisting of many items of an account with offsets. Judgment was granted on award of referee...Edward H. Fitts vs. Samuel Sugland - Judgment on award of referee for plff. Damages, $4. Each party to pay their own cost...

Turners Falls Lumber Co. vs. David A. Wood - This was an action on 2 promissory notes, one of $1200...and the other of $518...Judgment for plaintiffs on both...Edwin Pierce et al. vs. Levi A. Bates Jr. et al. Judgment for plaintiffs against Bates for account of $52.50...Edwin Pierce et al. vs. Allen Mansfield - Judgment for plaintiff on a promissory note...for $58...

William L. Bradley vs. Edward Barney - Judgment for plaintiff on a promissory note...for $212...Bradley Fertilizer Co. vs. Edward Barney - This was an action on a note given by George Fuller of Deerfield, upon which the defendant was sued as surety, for $300. Judgment for plaintiff on the same...

Asa C. Lewis vs. Lorenzo D. Joslyn appt. Judgment for plaintiff, amount $30...Nathaniel Holmes et al. vs. Stephen L. Pratt - Judgment for plaintiff on note...for $59.10, upon which $40 had been paid before suit. William R. Armstrong vs. R.L. Goss. Judgment for plaintiff...for $400...Nathaniel Holmes et al. vs. Thomas Lap[?]. Judgment for plaintiff for $11...

George W. Potter et al. vs. R.J. Goss. Judgment for plaintiff on 2 notes, one for $732 and another for $82.89, also an account of $319. Total, $1134.52. Frank L. Eldridge vs. R.L. Goss et al - Judgment for plaintiff on note, amount $350...In the case of S.L. Shattuck et al. vs. George Jones, in which a verdict for plaintiff was given by the jury, a motion was filed for a new trial. But the motion has been overruled.

The docket has been well cleared of old cases this term, some 40 being settled out of court, to which no reference has been made in our reports. Judge Aldrich has earned the thanks of suiters by his persistent labors in holding this, the longest term of the Superior Court, known for many years. The court adjourned for the term Fri...The law term of the Supreme Judicial Court will begin Sept. 28, with the full bench.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Business Enterprises, Courts, Courtship, Crime, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Government, Greenfield (MA), History, Horses, Law and Lawyers, Leverett (MA), Montague (MA), New Hampshire, Old Age, Outhouses, Poor, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Turners Falls (MA), Vendors and Purchasers, Work, Rowe (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 21, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
A man murdered in Coleraine

A man murdered in Coleraine - He is killed and robbed by two young ruffians - It is now 8 years since Simeon Peck killed Miss Cheney at Griswoldville, and Coleraine is again the scene of a tragedy, which in all its details has never had a parallel in the criminal annals of the County. The victim of this terrible crime is Joseph R. Farnsworth [i.e. Joseph Riley Farnsworth], known among his townsmen as "Riley", a quiet, inoffensive man, who dwelt with his wife and two children on his mother’s farm, on what is known as "Catamount Hill", some 2 miles and a half from Shelburne Falls.

The circumstances of the affair are these: On Tues. last Farnsworth, who served in the late war, went to Greenfield to be examined by a surgeon, as required, before making out an application for pension. He went back to Shelburne Falls on the train, and at the office of H.M. Puffer Esq., had his pension paper made out. When this business was finished, he started for home, getting a chance to ride with Levi Davenport, a neighbor.

They rode together until they came to the fork of two roads which led to the mountain. Farnsworth took the road up the ravine on the easterly side, while Davenport went the other way to his home. It had by this time begun to grow dark, and Farnsworth pushed along alone through a wood and came to a place where the road separates, a path leading up to Jack Woodard’s on the one hand and to his mother’s place on the other.

At this point someone steps suddenly from the cover of bushes by the roadside and, without a word of warning, strikes him a blow upon the forehead with a stick which prostrates him upon the ground. The blow is followed up with others or with kicks, until the man’s head is covered with ghastly wounds. He is then robbed of the few dollars which he had in his pocket book.

Farnsworth was not long wholly unconscious. Within half an hour he must have rallied sufficient strength to get upon his feet, and staggering and frequently falling, he made his way home, some one hundred rods distant, and which he reached by half past 7. He was able to tell his mother and a neighbor present a part of what had happened, and Dr. Canedy of Shelburne Falls was immediately sent for.

He arrived in the evening, but found the man so badly wounded there was little that could be done for him. Farnsworth could not tell who struck him, and becoming unconscious, he lingered until about 10 o’clock Wed. morning, when he died.

The news of the affair had by this time spread over the town, and efforts made to ascertain who were the perpetrators of the crime. Suspicion soon rested upon two young men who live in the vicinity, and who had not been seen since the murder. These were Daniel Dwight, a son of Josiah J. Dwight, and Herbert Davenport, a son of widow Roxana Davenport, and a nephew of the murdered man.

The former is 19 years of age and the latter 18, and both had borne a hard name among the people of the town. Going to the scene of the assault, a heavy print of a shoe was found, where the desperado stood when he gave the murderous blow, and a few feet in front was found the pool of blood which flowed from the wounds of his victim, and a bloody trail was made by Farnsworth as he rested and stumbled home.

Not far from his place a hickory stub was found where the stick, about an inch in diameter, had been cut; and in another direction the stick itself was discovered, which corresponded with the stub, and which had been thrown away after the assault. The stick, which is in the possession of one of the officers, was evidently cut by a left handed person. Dwight is known to be left handed.

It seems that the two boys had been to Farnsworth’s house the afternoon that he was away, borrowed fifty cents from his wife, all the money that she had - they agreeing to pay her back before the time of the county fair, when she wanted to spend it. They also took away a cheap watch which belonged to Farnsworth.

Before going to Greenfield Farnsworth had made known his errand to the neighbors, and the boys probably thought that he was going to bring home his pension money and so made their plans to waylay and rob him. But the money Farnsworth had on his person could not have exceeded 2 or 3 dollars. There had been ill feeling between the boys and Farnsworth before. He had not got along happily with his wife, being frequently jealous, it is thought by some, without cause, and the fellows had taken her part.

They have been heard to threaten him on her account. Dwight, who was married and lived with his wife in a house on his father’s farm, took away with him two suits of clothes, but young Davenport is not known to have carried away only such clothes as he happened to have on, and left behind a little money and a bank book.

Wed. aft. upwards of 50 men were out scouring the woods of Coleraine, Whitingham and Heath, under Officers Henry A. Howard of Coleraine and Deputy Sheriff [?] S. Frost of Shelburne Falls, and the search by some of the party was kept up all night, but was fruitless. Dwight and Davenport are both familiar with the woods for miles around, having hunted and roamed over them together.

http://www.franklins...hotossmcleodpond.php

It was thought that perhaps the fugitives had gone in the direction of North Adams, and an officer was sent there Thurs. morning, while the general search was partly abandoned. Though the young ruffians may evade their pursuers for a while, it is hardly possible to make a successful escape. Their photographs and descriptions will be sent broadcast. The Selectmen have offered a reward of $500 for their recovery, and mean to bring them to justice.

As there is no coroner in the vicinity, S.D. Bardwell Esq. of Shelburne Falls, as a Justice of the Peace, summoned a jury to view the remains. The jury consists of Hezekiah Smith, C.W. Shattuck, A.A. Smith, Thomas D. Purrington, H.C. Millington and Russell J. Smith. They visited the scene of the murder Wed. aft., and will meet again today, when probably a verdict in accordance with the facts we have related will be rendered.

Farnsworth’s funeral took place Thurs. morning and was largely attended by the people of the town. Rev. Mr. Cole, the Methodist clergyman of Coleraine, conducted the services. Farnsworth leaves a boy of 9 and a girl of 7. His age was about 35, and his mother, with whom he lived, is about 75. The family, though poor and ignorant, were considered of average respectability. The mother of the Davenport boy has always opposed his keeping company with Dwight, who is generally supposed to have been the leader in the matter, but the two were together a great deal, and had become hardened and desperate.

A note received by J.B. Clark, one of the Selectmen of the town on Sat., stated that there was no trace then of the murderers, but that the watch supposed to have been stolen by one of the boys, was found, and was in his possession.

Latest - Intelligence from Shelburne Falls yesterday, states that Dwight was caught about half past 10 Sat. eve. Half a dozen men were laying in wait for him around his house, and he came home at that time and fell into their clutches. The whereabouts of Davenport is not known. Dwight was put into the lock-up at Shelburne Falls yesterday morning.

[A followup to this murder can be found on p. 371 of Google Books "Publications of the American Statistical Association", 1892 - 1893. There is also mention of the sentence on p. 5 of Google Books "Public Documents of Massachusetts", 1876].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Crime, Criminals, Economics, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Greenfield (MA), History, Households, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Lost and Found, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Missing Persons, Mourning Customs, Murder, Names, Photographs, Police, Poor, Prisons

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
The town of Rowe

(Rowe) It is well known among botanists that many notable plants grow on sterile soil, so from some of our small and sequestered country towns have come many of our now prominent and useful men. I well remember when a boy, of living in the town of Rowe 40 years ago, just how it appeared.

I was a poor farmer’s boy, at work on a farm for wages, at 12 dollars per month. I had been well schooled in the village schools of the time, but they said "there was to be a select school in the center of the town, to be taught by Mr. John Wells, a son of Hon. Noah Wells of Rowe, who had just graduated at Williamstown, taking the highest honors in his class".

John succeeded in getting a large class, made up of the young ladies and gentlemen of his native town. I was a pupil among the others, and here I wish to say that a more successful school was never taught by any man. John Wells was then a young man, tall, straight as an arrow, with a beautiful face, and an expression like a modest girl. At the close of the school, we had an exhibition in the old Unitarian Church. It was filled to overflowing, and all the scholars took a part. The whole thing was a great success for Mr. Wells and a credit to his pupils.

The succeeding winter I taught the "winter school" in the center of the town, having among my scholars a small boy, the son of Rev. William Stearns, named George Stearns. George was a bright, blue-eyed boy of about 10 years old, good, but very mischievous. I gave him his first lesson in Latin grammar. I well remember how he used to recite in such a way as to make fun for the other scholars.

Well, Mr. John Wells is now Hon. John Wells of the Supreme court; and little Georgie Stearns is the celebrated Springfield lawyer, one of the most eminent of his profession in the State. The following year I taught a school in the north west part of the town, in a little "hut of a school house", and among my scholars was a little boy by the name of Noah Cressy.

[See Google Books "American Law Review: 1875 - 1876" for a long biographical entry on John Wells].

[See Google Books "Second annual report on the diseases of the domestic animals in Connecticut" by Noah Cressy].

There were 3 brothers of the Cressy family living in the district, and their children constituted the greater part of the school. the following year I went away to study medicine, and lost sight of little Noah, and the next I heard of him he was "Professor Noah Cressy of the Massachusetts Agricultural college, and veterinary surgeon to the State of Connecticut".

A chum went with me from Rowe to study medicine in the same office with me, the office of Moses Barrett M.D., located in the town of Charlemont. Dr. Barrett was a native of Rowe and had studied medicine and graduated with high honors. My chum was C.K. Fiske of Rowe, who graduated with me at the Berkshire Medical college in 1842. Dr. Fiske became an eminent dentist and settled in St. Johns, New Brunswick.

The late Major Reed, sheriff of this county, was for a long time a merchant in Rowe, if not born there. He had a son by the name of Samuel Reed, a scholar in my school, who afterward studied medicine, graduated, started for California, and died on the passage.

I frequently meet Prof. Cressy. He is a wide awake, congenial, friendly man, but eminently learned in his profession. Last week we exchanged some books, I giving him Harris on Insects, and he giving me "The Elements of General and Pathological Anatomy" by David Craige, M.D., published in Edinburg in 1828.

On the fly leaf is this, written in pencil: "To Dr. Craige, belongs the merit of having written the first distinct and comprehensive work on general anatomy" signed George Gulliver, M.D. There is probably not more than one or two other works of the kind and edition in this country. David Rice, M.D.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Children, Connecticut, Courts, Diseases, Economics, Education, Emigration and Immigration, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, History, Insects, Jokes, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Medicine / Hospitals, Obituaries, Police, Poor

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Shelburne Falls

(Shelburne Falls) A remarkable instance of honor has lately been shown where a poor man has paid the amount due on a note which had been outlawed 20 years. We shall have an honest tear to drop at that man's funeral.
 

Subjects: Economics, Mourning Customs, Poor, Robbers and Outlaws, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A number of young people who have given the symphony concerts in Deerfield that have attracted so much attention, were induced by some ladies of Greenfield to favor a few of our people with the entertainment at the Parlor of the Unitarian Church on Thurs. eve. The audience completely filled the room and are rapturous in their praise of the novel concert. The musicians were under the direction of Miss Lincoln and performed upon a curious medley of instruments. The programme included a fine recitation by one of the young ladies. There is an earnest wish that the entertainment may be repeated here. The proceeds of the concert were given to a family in needy circumstances.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Charity, Deerfield (MA), Family, Greenfield (MA), Music, Poor, Religion, Women

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 17, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Buckland

Forest Cranson has lost his only cow.

[An excellent description of this man's life and family can be found at http://wc.rootsweb.a...db=cranson2&id=I0094 ].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Buckland (MA), Obituaries, Poor, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 17, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Court record

The second week of the Superior Court was opened at 10 o’clock Mon. The jury in the case of Peleg Adams vs. John Single, and the countersuit of Single vs. Adams, brought in a verdict on each action separately, viz.: In the former for Adams, amount $522; and in the latter for Single, $808, giving a difference in Single’s favor of $286.

The criminal cases were then taken up before the second jury as follows: Timothy Sullivan of Greenfield, on two indictments for larceny. The transaction itself was so lately chronicled that it is unnecessary to repeat it here, but simply to state that the defendant is the party who carried off Conductor Tharp’s clothing, and A.N. Hull’s shoes from the Mansion House. He was found guilty and sentenced to two years at the State Prison at Charlestown; two days solitary. District Attorney for Commonwealth.

Patrick Fraine of Charlemont was tried on two indictments. One for arson and another for larceny from the building, both being tried at the same time. The first charge was for the alleged firing of the Zoar depot last March, and the second for stealing from the same. The defendant worked upon the railroad at the Tunnel and boarded at Zoar. The parties with whom he boarded testified that Fraine came home the night of the fire at 5 minutes before 9, and the alarm was given about half past 9.

The defendant, who had no council, cross questioned the witnesses with considerable shrewdness, and brought out from the depot master the fact that some railroad men were in the depot during the eve; the west end of which was used as a store, and that there was a large fire in the stove, so much that some of the party complained of the heat, but it was claimed that the fire was out, or nearly so, when the store was closed.

The party who lived near, and who seemed to have discovered the fire first, described it as wholly confined to the southwest end, or store part, and there seemed to be no fire in the rest of the building. The evidence seemed very small to hold the defendant on the charge of arson, and the verdict of the jury acquitted the prisoner at the bar therefor.

On the allegation of larceny, the evidence was more conclusive, two witnesses testifying to the defendant having pennies and 5 cent pieces in his pockets, some being in a pocket handkerchief and others done up in a pair of stockings in the defendant’s coat at the place he boarded. On this charge he was found guilty and sentenced to 2 years in the House of Correction at Pittsfield. District Attorney for Commonwealth.

Marshall H. Porter of Williamstown and Henry Smith of South Deerfield, for larceny, and the former also for receiving stolen goods. The defendant, Porter, a dark mulatto, who gave his age as 30, said he was visiting at South Deerfield. He claimed to have had nothing to do with the larceny, but said the articles found on him were given him by Henry Moore, although he acknowledged he knew they were stolen.

It appeared by the confession of Smith, who is a bright colored boy of about 16 years of age, that the larceny alleged consisted in entering the store in the building connected with the Bloody Brook House at South Deerfield; the boy Smith watching in the shade of a large elm tree in front of the store, while Porter and Moore entered the store by the bulk-head and did the stealing. The articles taken were 2 or 3 watches, a revolver, candy, some currency and silver coin and other miscellaneous items.

Henry Moore, indicted with the others for the larceny, was bailed by his father, an was not on hand to be tried with the others. Porter and Smith were found guilty and sentenced each to 3 years at the House of Correction in Pittsfield; District Attorney for Commonwealth, A. Brainard for Smith. A bench warrant was issued for the arrest of Henry Moore, who has become scarce in this region since the time he was required at this court to plead with the others to the alleged burglary.

George Doolittle of Greenfield, for assault and battery. The present case came up on an appeal from sentence of the magistrate. The said assault and battery was made upon H.E. Keuran, while visiting the Mansion House, the defendant being keeper of the hotel. The case was virtually decided on the testimony of Doolittle himself, who, after detailing the fact of seeing Keuran passing back and forth through the bar room to the wash room, had ordered Keuran to leave and not be hanging around there, to which the reply was made that he had as much money in there as the defendant, and should go when he got ready, at same time drawing a pocket knife and threatening bodily harm if he was put out; upon which the defendant struck him with his fist, and as he was going out struck him two more blows.

The fact of any knife being drawn was denied by Keuran, who also said he had no such knife as described with him at the time. Several witnesses detailed the facts as they saw them, several testifying they saw a knife in Keuran’s hand, but the court ruled that even if there was any justification for the first blow self defense did not require the others, and according to the defendant’s own testimony, the said blows were given when Keuran was getting away about as fast as he could. Verdict of guilty. Sentence deferred. District Attorney for Commonwealth, A. DeWolf for defendant.

The case of Michael Moran for larceny came up on appeal from a magistrate’s trail, and on motion the complaint was quashed for informality. D. Aiken for defendant.
u
Frank P. Bell of Coleraine for assalt and battery had a lengthy trial occupying the most of Thurs. The alleged assault was made with a shovel upon George H. Phillips, one of the Selectmen of the Town, and also another assault upon Newton G. Lake, who was with him at the time. The defendant has not lived very peaceably with certain of his neighbors for some time, and probably dates back to the adultery case of a few years ago, at which the present defendant was one of the parties.

The present difficulty seems to have arisen about one Joshua Fairbanks, a town pauper, at the time living at Bell’s house. Mr. Phillips testified that he went to the defendant’s house, either to get Fairbanks or to notify defendant that the town would not pay for his support. Upon which the defendant ordered them away, using abusive language, and that afterward he came out armed with a shovel and not only assaulted them with his fist, but struck at them with his shovel, and finally thrust the shovel against Mr. Phillips, knocking him down.

All this the defendant denied. The jury, however, found the "Christian Hill" defendant guilty. when the time for sentencing arrived, Bell had departed, he having been on bail since his preliminary trial before the magistrate. His bail was called and defaulted, and a bench warrant issued for his arrest. District Attorney for Commmonwealth, C.C. Conant for defendant. This closed the criminal cases and the civil list was resumed with.

Joseph H. Hollister vs. Quincy Mutual Fire Insurance Co. In this case the plaintiff claims a sum due him on a policy in said company. The company, however, defend, alleging that the plaintiff has no claim on them, as he had failed to pay an assessment made in the required time, and his policy had consequently lapsed to the company. The court ordered the jury to return a verdict for the defendant, upon the law involved on an agreed statement of facts, and the case goes at once to the Supreme Court on the questions of law. C.C. Conant for plaintiff, D. Aiken for defendant.

Edward E. Coleman et al. vs. Loren S. Bartlett et al. - This was an action of contract for the recovery of the price of a turbine water wheel, made by E.E. Coleman & Co. of Shelburne Falls, for Loren S. Bartlett & Son of Northampton - the value of the wheel, worksetting the same and interest, amounting to $567.

The wheel in question was put into the mill some 2 years ago, and the contract therefor, the defendants allege, was that the plaintiffs agreed to put in the said wheel and to warrant it to work to the satisfaction of the defendants; that it should use less water and give more power than the wheel they were then using; but after trying the wheel for some time, with the same water as on the old wheel, found they got less power and could not operate the mill; and that on notice given of these facts to the defendants, they endeavored to remedy the defects, but still it did not work to their satisfaction, and they therefore refused to pay for the same.

The case was very thoroughly heard and a great amount of evidence introduced to show the conditions under which wheels are usually put into mills, the nature of turbine wheels in general, and much other matter relative thereto - of interest, perhaps to mill owners, or to the relative value of turbines and the conditions necessary to their successful working; but as a whole, the general interest in the case was not so great as in many others. Verdict for defendants. S.T. Field for plffs.; DW. Bond & H.H. Bond for defts.

Lyman J. Wait vs. Justin Thayer et al. - This case was partially presented to the jury, but was suspended to enable counsel to go to Brattleboro to take the deposition of S.F. Warner. The action is on a promissory note of $1000, given by Warner and endorsed by Thayer, Sargent & Co.of Northampton, Mr. Warner being at the time a member of the above named firm. The case attracts considerable attention on account of several nice points of commercial law involved.

While waiting for the taking of the deposition mentioned, the case of Joel R. Davenport vs. the inhabitants of Coleraine was taken up before the same jury. This action is for injury alleged to have been received by the plaintiff while traveling on the highway in said town. The case is still on trial.

The cases of Mary M. Hillman vs. The Inhabitants of Charlemont, and that of Chandler A. Vincent vs. The Inhabitants of Rowe stand next in order of trial. It will probably take the most of the present week to finish up the cases still standing for trial.
 

Subjects: Accidents, African-Americans / Blacks, Bars (Drinking establishments), Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Charlemont (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Family, Fires, Food, Government, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Hotels, Massachusetts, Missing Persons, Poor, Prisons, Racism, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 16, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Willard Plumley was brought up before Justice Davis for stealing corn from a field belonging to William B. Hutchins of West Deerfield. But the theft was not very clearly proven, and the man was discharged.

[Plumley was obviously a poor man. See p. 337 in Francis McGee Thompson and Lucy Cutler Kellogg's "History of Greenfield: Shire town of Franklin County, Massachusetts". Thanks, Google Books!].
 

Subjects: Courts, Crime, Criminals, Deerfield (MA), Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Greenfield (MA), History, Literature / Web Pages, Poor, Robbers and Outlaws

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 2, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Poisoned bologna



11 children, one of whom has since died, were poisoned at Philadelphia Thurs., by eating bologna sausage which had been thrown away by a grocery man, and which was picked up, cleaned and eaten by a boy named Koenig, who also gave some of it to the children. The grocery man and sausage maker were arrested.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Businesspeople, Children, Food, Meat, Poisoning, Police, Poor, Urbanization / Cities

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 2, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Conway

Visiting our cemetery the other eve., we were greatly impressed from the many new graves within a year. The past season has been sad, very sad to us. Who has not wept o’er some loved one fallen? Pure white tablets, monumental shafts, marble slabs, how thickly we are marking here and there o’er our new made graves. Beautiful flowers, wreaths, yet watered with bitter tears speaks to the soul of grief not simulated but sincere. One of the most tastefully decorated here is the work of Mrs. Chandler Field; her husband and child’s grave with other members of the household lying in the neatly laid out, and well cared for elegant home lot.

At one end is the grave of their bound boy taken from the Monson Almshouse http://www.hampdenco...nson/everts/033.html who died also with the diphtheria. Tender, kindly hand-robed the childish form laying him gently down with their own kindred dead, and we saw last night sweet fresh flowers on his grave. Heaven’s blessing will rest on those who care for the poor orphaned waifs of humanity.
 

Subjects: Cemeteries, Charity, Children, Conway (MA), Diseases, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Households, Massachusetts, Mourning Customs, Poor, Religion, Statues, Women, Work, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 29, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

A robbery at Tough End Sat. night is reported, and an attempt by tramps to fire Mrs. Colle's barn.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Greenfield (MA), Irish, Poor, Robbers and Outlaws, Tramps, Women

Posted by stew - Fri, Dec 12, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Died

Ruddock, Dr. Asa A., age 77, died in Buckland June 21; Oefinger, Eva, wife of Jacob Oefinger, died at the almshouse on July 9.
 

Subjects: Buckland (MA), Medical Personnel, Obituaries, Poor

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 11, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
The Odd Fellows [or Oddfellows] at Lake Pleasant

Seldom have fairer skies lured the picnicker to the Lake than shone last Thurs., upon the occasion of the fourth annual picnic of the Connecticut River Valley Association of Odd Fellows. http://www.ioof.org/ The river towns were well represented, many coming from Northampton, Holyoke and Springfield to the south; From Shelburne Falls and North Adams via the Tunnel, to the West; from Fitchburg and Leominster, with intermediate towns to the east, while from Keene, N.H. and Brattleboro, Ct., good delegations were sent. The no. of lodges present was 19, and encampments, 3; estimated to have been 1200 members of the Order, and with their ladies and friends, from 3000 to 4000 persons at the Lake during the day.

The general exercises were begun with the band concert in the Grove, the Hartford City Band leading, following which, the Brattleboro and Keene Brass bands kept the air resounding with melody. The first named band seemed to be the favorite, and executed some very fine pieces, among which an overture, "The Golden Crown" and "Potpourri" from Bellisario were the best, while "Concert Polka" by the Keene Band, with a solo by Will Allen, was decidedly applauded.

The exercises at the speaker’s stand were of the first order; the principal thing being the address by the orator of the day, Rev. A.H. Sweetser of Springfield, who was introduced to the audience by H.A. Bowen of Shelburne Falls, President of the Association. The speaker in opening, referred to the symbolism of Odd Fellowship as being in consonance with everything around us; as light symbolizes heaven, darkness hell; flowers of fragrance, and all nature as of God; so the "clasped hands", the "three links", etc. of the Order, spoke of great truths, and symbols were right if they had truth behind them.

The system of Odd Fellowship came, not as an interloper upon earth, but it was formed to fill a need, and it came to stay, as long as irreligion and want were abroad among men. by association, which as the name implied meant strength - they would apply their principles to the wants and needs of life. Friendship, love and truth were the threefold cords which they were to use, and for which they should labor with their united strength. If you obey the principles of our order, said the speaker, you have no need of liturgies or dogmas, but you have enough to carry you through life and into the gates of the Celestial City.

He next referred to the need of sympathy; on the need of extending it to every man; for no man lived but what had a heart and a spark of God within him. Our present social and educational fabric was characterized as wholly wrong. Social life was shoddy; the ill educated were put forward, and to "shine well" without "being well", was the curse of the world. Odd Fellowship was to correct this; it found alone the man, and whatever his cost; it discerned true worth and gave to it its true respect.

The speaker next passed to the feminine branch of the Order, if it may be thus called, and dwelt with words of praise on the "Sisterhood of Rebecca". He said they found no time to mount the rostrum and to proclaim their duties and rights by noisy words, but in the quiet paths of home and the sphere in which their branch of the order furnished them, they performed the noblest duties of life. In closing, he said that the great duty of the fraternity was to bring people together, to root out sectarian feeling in the churches, and to teach all the true spirit of humanity and brotherhood.

The address was well written and delivered in an excellent manner, occupying about 40 minutes, during which time the vast crowd remained quiet, listening with evident satisfaction. The various exercises at the stand were interspersed by several good songs by J.A. Maxam of Keene, and glees by a male quartette from the same place. Billy Fisher of Springfield amused the people considerably by rendering one or two comic pieces and the delivery of a stump speech.

During the afternoon, the lovers of the "light fantastic" crowded the Pavilion, tripping to the notes of Southland’s Orchestra of Springfield, while a majority of the balance pressed the borders sof the Lake to catch a glimpse of the boat and tub races. For some reason, the contestants for the prizes of the athletic sports rather held back, and for a time it seemed as this part of the programme would have to be omitted; but champions at last were found, and the races had, with the following results:

Boat race for men, 3/4 of a mile with turn, 3 entries, prize, a gold-lined silver goblet, won by Henry Howell of Springfield; boat race for ladies, half mile and turn, 2 entries, first prize a silver butter dish, won by Miss Mary Mehony; second prize, a gold lined silver cup, won by Miss Nellie Malone, both of Springfield. the tub race, 100 yards with turn, 3 entries, prize a gold lined silver spoon holder, won by John McHanna of Springfield. The sack race, 200 yards with turn, two entries, prize a silver napkin ring with stand, was also won by John McHanna.

The general exercises, except the dancing, closed with a dress parade in regalia, by the Agawam Oasis and Monadnock encampments. While the crowd were enjoying the public programme, the knots of hundreds were equally interested by the semi-public amusements of boating on the lake, swinging in the grove, eating and drinking and marveling at the talking wonders of Punch and Judy. quiet and good order reigned, and all interested voted it the most successful picnic of the Association.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Beverages, Charity, Clubs, Connecticut, Connecticut River, Contests, Dance, Education, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Jokes, Lake Pleasant (MA), Light, Massachusetts, Montague (MA), Music, Names, New Hampshire, Noise, Poor, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 9, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

D.A. Wood of Riverside, arrested on an execution, was examined before S.O. Lamb, Master in Chancery http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/m091.htm last week, on his application to take the poor debtor’s oath. After a hearing of 3 or 4 days his application was rejected and he was left in custody of the officer. G.D. Williams appeared for Wood and F.F. Fay and G.L. Barton for the creditors.
 

Subjects: Connecticut River, Economics, Gill (MA), Greenfield (MA), Law and Lawyers, Police, Poor

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 8, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 12, 1875
Conway

Lewis Franklin, on or near the Conway line, deserves a little mention. Commencing life a poor boy, penniless, his early manhood the career of a peddler, later a day laborer, but by his industry and economy aided by his good wife, has reared 9 children and secured for their own declining years, it is true, a small but a pleasant and comfortable home. Little by little improving his place, at his leisure, and adding to its comforts, during the past 2 or 3 years enlarging, repairing and painting his buildings.

When last we passed it we were pleased with its peculiar look of snugness and home rest. The many flowers surrounding the front betray an innate taste and love of the beautiful. We dream of "peace in a cottage" and feel and know, though not rich, he has had what he deserved, a happy home.
 

Subjects: Conway (MA), Economics, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Households, Poor, Vendors and Purchasers, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 6, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 12, 1875
Thief life in Dublin

From a story in the July "Atlantic" entitled "Broke jail" by a new writer
 

Subjects: Family, Irish, Literature / Web Pages, Poor, Robbers and Outlaws

Posted by stew - Fri, Dec 5, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Dennis Rafferty, complained of by one of the Selectmen as a vagrant, pleaded guilty before Justice Davis, and was sent to the State workhouse for 6 months.
 

Subjects: Courts, Crime, Government, Greenfield (MA), Poor, Tramps

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 21, 1875
Babies - welcome and unwelcome

The possessor of a thoroughly modern baby is to be pitied, and so is the child. We mean that unwelcome human atom which arrives in the family of the ultra fashionable lady, who believes that to be a mother at all, a woman must surely stand on the wrong side of fate. It cries, and what reason has it to do anything else? Then there is the baby of the wretched, overworked woman whose motherly instincts are strong and sweet, but whose many cares and duties are all pleading for attention at once, while the child wails for the tender touch of affectionate care, and its pathetic cry tells her that it possesses a dim, unreasoning, but still a certain conviction, that it is not wanted in the household. A dog knows when it is not invited to stay, and a baby is as conscious of a lack of cordial welcome, no matter how dearly it is beloved, after it has once been folded in its mother's arms, and its early life shows the blight...
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Child Abuse, Children, Family, Fashion, Households, Poor, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 21, 1875
North Leverett

The people of North Leverett met in the village hall, which was brilliantly lighted and beautifully adorned with evergreens, mottos, etc., on the eve of the 17th, to celebrate the centennial of the battle of Bunker Hill. The exercises commenced with prayer by Rev. B. Newton, then select reading suiting the occasion and appropriate remarks, who was followed by others in relating interesting incidents of the American Revolution and the late rebellion, in which stealing from the enemy became a subject of discussion; although none really contended that in such cases theft is fully justifiable, yet some seemed to think that circumstances and the usages of war might, to some extent, be a palliation, which strikingly reminded us of a case of a woman brought into court for stealing a pair of mittens for her husband who was very poor, and the jury brought in a verdict of not guilty, and hoped she would not do so again.

/ Weapons of defense and relics used in the Revolution were exhibited, among which was a bottle that would contain about a pint, used by one Mr. Gardner, a veteran in the war, which held spirits enough to last him a year, which speaks well for the temperance of those days.

/ The hall was filled to overflowing and the whole company were generously treated with rich cake and lemonade...
 

Subjects: Amusements, Beverages, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Glass / Windows, Heritage Activities, History, Leverett (MA), Light, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Poor, Religion, Robbers and Outlaws, Temperance, War / Weaponry, Women, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 7, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

We referred last week to the fact that Republican Lodge was organized under a charter granted by Paul Revere in 1795. The first record book of the lodge is still preserved, and is quite an interesting relic of antiquity. We find that in the original bylaws the fraternity were subjected to very strict rules, as will be seen by the following extract: "Should any Brother be so impudent as to make use of any profane language or indecent behavior during Lodge hours, he or they so offending shall pay a fine of one shilling, lawful money, for every such offense, to be put into the fund for the relief of the poor brethren.

/ And the fraternity were instructed to be cautious, both within and without the lodge, that no reflection be cast against the order. They had a temperance clause in their bylaws, too: "If any Brother should be so void of shame as to disguise himself with liquor, or come to the lodge disguised in liquor, he shall be fined 25 cents and be dismissed for the night, and at the next meeting be reprimanded", and no brother was allowed to play cards or gamble. In 1820, however, we find that at a meeting where only 3 were present, it was voted to pass a bill of 18 cents for refreshments, which would cover the price for 3 glasses of rum; but that was a miserable allowance for those days. We find that as early as 1814, Hon. George Grennell, who is yet with us, held an office in the lodge, and a few years afterward was made Worshipful Master.
 

Subjects: Charity, Clubs, Drunkenness, Economics, Freemasonry, Gambling, Glass / Windows, Greenfield (MA), History, Law and Lawyers, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Poor, Temperance, Words

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 7, 1875
News of the week

John L. White of Boston is under arrest for outraging the person of Emma G. Escabel, the 10 year old daughter of his washerwoman, the girl having yielded to him through the influence of a promised visit to Barnum's hippodrome and a new silk dress.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Child Abuse, Children, Circus, Crime, Criminals, Family, Fashion, Police, Poor, Rape, Seduction, Sex Crimes, Women, Work, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, June 7, 1875
News of the week

Oscar F. Crandall of Newport, eloped to New York Mon. might, with a young woman who has been employed in a family in the town, leaving a wife and 2 children in destitute circumstances.
 

Subjects: Children, Crime, Criminals, Family, Marriage and Elopement, Poor, Scandals, Sex Crimes, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 31, 1875
News about town: Greenfield items

Two car loads of laborers were sent up last week to the Tunnel, free, being told that there was work for them there, but there was none and they are tramping about the country, living on farmers and others, being penniless.
 

Subjects: Economics, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Poor, Trains, Tramps, Transportation, Work

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, May 17, 1875
Heath

M.B. Crozier lost his horse a few days since. It fell dead while driving. We hope he will receive "tangible" sympathy.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Economics, Horses, Obituaries, Poor, Transportation, Heath (MA)


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