You are not logged in.   
Username: 
Password: 

Forgot password / Verify | Sign up now! | Printer Friendly

The Franklin County Publication Archive Index is constantly updated. By creating an account you can elect to receive notices when new articles are added and when people comment on the articles.

Join today!

 

Apr 13, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Police

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Greenfield - There was a bloody melee among Manly McClure's brickmakers on Sat. Two, Cook and Tucker, beat a comrade's face into jelly. They were arrested by policemen Jones and Carbee, and bound over to the Superior Court by Justice Davis.


 

Subjects: Courts, Crime, Criminals, Food, Greenfield (MA), Police, Work, Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Greenfield - Sheriff Wells, who has been ill for some weeks, is slowly regaining his health.
 

Subjects: Diseases, Greenfield (MA), Police

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Coleraine Murder

The Coleraine Murder - As briefly stated in our last issue, Daniel Dwight, supposed to be one of the murderers of Joseph R. Farnsworth, was arrested Sat. night at the door of his father’s house on Catamount Hill, Coleraine, where he had come 5 days after the murder. There were 6 men, under Deputy Sheriff John Gould, stationed around the house, and between 10 and 11 o’clock, they saw a man coming up the road, which proved to be young Dwight.

They allowed him to approach near the house, when a signal was given, and they stepped from their hiding places. Dwight ran around the house in the direction of the barn, but he was then surrounded and forced to surrender. When taken into the house before his father, he fainted.

Dwight was confined in the lock-up at Shelburne Falls, and on Mon., Trial Justice Brainard of Greenfield held a court at the office of H.M.Puffer, Esq., and had the young man brought before him. A large gathering of people were in attendance, and among them Dwight’s wife, father and mother.

He pleaded not guilty, and the magistrate, without having a hearing of evidence, arraigned him on the charge of murder and continued the case to Mon. the 17th. Officers Swan and Gould then brought the prisoner to Greenfield,where he is now confined in jail. Dwight appears quite calm and is not disposed to talk much about the affair. He accounts for his absence and his whereabouts during the 4 days as follows:

"I had some trouble with my wife on Tues. aft., which had ended by my saying I was going off, and her replying that she hoped I would, and what was more, that I would stay away. She then started to go to father’s house, which is only a short distance from mine, and I started for a pasture where some of father’s cattle were grazing.

On the way I met Herbert Davenport, and together we went to Farnsworth’s house, and afterward went down the lane to the road leading to Shelburne Falls. Herbert wanted a cane, so we stopped and cut one, I bending the tree over while he cut it; but he did not carry it long before he threw it away.

From there we went through the fields directly to my house, where I changed my clothes and gave a suit to Herbert, as his were all patched and dirty. We left home about 5 o’clock, and went down the mountain to Heath, and then through Hartwellville down to North Adams, getting there on Wed. aft.

We walked all Tues. night.Wed. night we slept on the hills near North Adams, and on Thurs. morning, after staying a while in North Adams, we walked to Pownal on the railroad track. At Pownal we got on board a train which was returning with the firemen from the muster at North Adams that day.

At Petersburg Junction Herbert got left with some Salem, N.Y. firemen, because the train started so quick, and I could not get off, it was going so fast. That night I stopped at Greenwich, N.Y. and registered my name in the hotel book in full - Daniel J. Dwight, Coleraine, Mass. I remained there that night, but had nothing to eat, as I only had money enough to pay for my lodging.

[For more information on this area, see the Internet Archive’s "Williamstown, the Berkshire Hills, and thereabout"]

The next day I walked to Troy. I did not remain there long because I was hungry and sick, and thought I would go right home and go to work for father, and let my wife do as she chose. Coming back I got a ride part of the way on a freight train, and got to N. Adams Sat. aft.,and walked to central shaft in the tunnel, and from there I rode to the east end on the workmen’s train and walked to Zoar, where they let me ride on a hand car to Charlemont. From there I rode with a Mr.Wells as far as his house, and then went across the fields home".



A portion of Dwight’s story has proved to be true. Bradley Davenport and Wesley Woodard, sent to Petersburg Junction, sent back that two men answering the description of Dwight and Davenport had been there. At Greenwich, N.Y., Dwight’s name was found registered in full, as he had said, and there is nothing to show that Davenport was with him at the time.

The Davenport boy arrested - Search was continued for Davenport and finally he was tracked to Williamstown, and Thurs. aft. was found there by a Mr. White. He made no efforts to escape, but on the other hand seemed glad to give himself up.

He was brought through the tunnel to Shelburne Falls Fri. morning, and Trial Justice Brainard of Greenfield held a preliminary trial, arraigned him for murder, and continued the trial until the 27th. The Davenport boy’s narrative is substantially the same as that given by Dwight, but he does not deny that they killed Farnsworth.

He says their only object was to obtain money, that he had no enmity or ill will towards the murdered man. He and Dwight had made up their minds to go West and hoped to get enough money from Farnsworth to pay their expenses, but he says they only got about $4.

There were 2 sticks cut, he says, a walnut and a maple. It was with the latter that Farnsworth was knocked down. He says that he did not do the striking, though he was there. After he was left at Petersburg Junction, he wandered from place to place, working for something to eat when he could get employment, and was endeavoring to get back home.

Davenport is not of ordinary intelligence. He was dull at school, and has since been lazy and shiftless. Want of mental responsibility will be entered as a plea in his behalf. His mother says that he has always been a "strange boy". She has another son and a daughter who are bright, active and industrious.

Davenport was brought to Greenfield and lodged in jail on Fri. by Deputy Sheriff Swan. Both boys, who are allowed to be together when not locked in their cells, do not appear to be cast down or afflicted much with remorse. They will be brought before the Grand Jury at the November Court and if bills are found against them the trial will be before a special session of the Supreme Court.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Diseases, Economics, Education, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Food, Greenfield (MA), Handicapped, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Hotels, Households, Juvenile Delinquents, Marriage and Elopement, Missing Persons, Murder, Names, Police

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

The United States detectives have recently captured another lot of the Alabama and Tennessee counterfeiters, among them J.C.Graham of Gainesville, Sumter County, ...
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, Economics, Government, Police

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

As some boys were playing theatre [i.e. theater] in a stable in Philadelphia Sat. night,William Wise, aged 11, accidentally shot and killed Samuel Stroup, aged 13, with a gun, which was not supposed to be loaded. Wise has been arrested.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Children, Crime, Police, Show Business

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - Mr. Wesley Woodard has been appointed constable of Buckland.
 

Subjects: Buckland (MA), Police, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - Mon. Trial Justice John A. Winslow Esq. of Charlemont fined William O. Donahue for drunkenness, $2 and costs; Thomas Sharky for assault and battery upon David Smith, bookkeeper for James H. Edwards, $5 and costs. The complaint against Robert Maloney for disorderly conduct was nollo prosequied. The other two for want of money, went down to lodge and board with Sheriff Wells.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Drunkenness, Economics, Police, Prisons, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Work

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 21, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - At a dance at Montague City the other night a lot of fellows pounced upon Abner Avery without provocation, and pounded him in a fearful manner. Constables Allen and Jones gathered in 5 of the fellows, and Whit. Berden, James Swing, Horatio Cutler and Lewis Buffum were each fined $8.92, while David Snow was discharged.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Dance, Economics, Montague (MA), Police, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 21, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - About 2 months since, some of the young men of each denomination here came together to organize an association, encouraged by Rev. Mr. Groth, Rev. Mr. Howes and Rev. Mr. Seaver. Till the present month they have held their meetings in the chapels of the churches and at Wood's Hall, Riverside. For the present month they have pitched a large tent on the Avenue on 4th Street, in which meetings are to be held whenever circumstances will permit. Last eve., Wed. was the first.

The meeting was largely attended, the tent being filled and the number outside being a hundred or more....the addresses being interspersed with singing and praying. Considering the large no. present, and the fact that we are a manufacturing people, the order was better than should be expected, without the assistance of others to enforce order, and the result of the meeting was gratifying to the friends of the association...
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Clubs, Connecticut River, Gill (MA), Montague (MA), Music, Police, Religion, Roads, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 21, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
A man murdered in Coleraine

A man murdered in Coleraine - He is killed and robbed by two young ruffians - It is now 8 years since Simeon Peck killed Miss Cheney at Griswoldville, and Coleraine is again the scene of a tragedy, which in all its details has never had a parallel in the criminal annals of the County. The victim of this terrible crime is Joseph R. Farnsworth [i.e. Joseph Riley Farnsworth], known among his townsmen as "Riley", a quiet, inoffensive man, who dwelt with his wife and two children on his mother’s farm, on what is known as "Catamount Hill", some 2 miles and a half from Shelburne Falls.

The circumstances of the affair are these: On Tues. last Farnsworth, who served in the late war, went to Greenfield to be examined by a surgeon, as required, before making out an application for pension. He went back to Shelburne Falls on the train, and at the office of H.M. Puffer Esq., had his pension paper made out. When this business was finished, he started for home, getting a chance to ride with Levi Davenport, a neighbor.

They rode together until they came to the fork of two roads which led to the mountain. Farnsworth took the road up the ravine on the easterly side, while Davenport went the other way to his home. It had by this time begun to grow dark, and Farnsworth pushed along alone through a wood and came to a place where the road separates, a path leading up to Jack Woodard’s on the one hand and to his mother’s place on the other.

At this point someone steps suddenly from the cover of bushes by the roadside and, without a word of warning, strikes him a blow upon the forehead with a stick which prostrates him upon the ground. The blow is followed up with others or with kicks, until the man’s head is covered with ghastly wounds. He is then robbed of the few dollars which he had in his pocket book.

Farnsworth was not long wholly unconscious. Within half an hour he must have rallied sufficient strength to get upon his feet, and staggering and frequently falling, he made his way home, some one hundred rods distant, and which he reached by half past 7. He was able to tell his mother and a neighbor present a part of what had happened, and Dr. Canedy of Shelburne Falls was immediately sent for.

He arrived in the evening, but found the man so badly wounded there was little that could be done for him. Farnsworth could not tell who struck him, and becoming unconscious, he lingered until about 10 o’clock Wed. morning, when he died.

The news of the affair had by this time spread over the town, and efforts made to ascertain who were the perpetrators of the crime. Suspicion soon rested upon two young men who live in the vicinity, and who had not been seen since the murder. These were Daniel Dwight, a son of Josiah J. Dwight, and Herbert Davenport, a son of widow Roxana Davenport, and a nephew of the murdered man.

The former is 19 years of age and the latter 18, and both had borne a hard name among the people of the town. Going to the scene of the assault, a heavy print of a shoe was found, where the desperado stood when he gave the murderous blow, and a few feet in front was found the pool of blood which flowed from the wounds of his victim, and a bloody trail was made by Farnsworth as he rested and stumbled home.

Not far from his place a hickory stub was found where the stick, about an inch in diameter, had been cut; and in another direction the stick itself was discovered, which corresponded with the stub, and which had been thrown away after the assault. The stick, which is in the possession of one of the officers, was evidently cut by a left handed person. Dwight is known to be left handed.

It seems that the two boys had been to Farnsworth’s house the afternoon that he was away, borrowed fifty cents from his wife, all the money that she had - they agreeing to pay her back before the time of the county fair, when she wanted to spend it. They also took away a cheap watch which belonged to Farnsworth.

Before going to Greenfield Farnsworth had made known his errand to the neighbors, and the boys probably thought that he was going to bring home his pension money and so made their plans to waylay and rob him. But the money Farnsworth had on his person could not have exceeded 2 or 3 dollars. There had been ill feeling between the boys and Farnsworth before. He had not got along happily with his wife, being frequently jealous, it is thought by some, without cause, and the fellows had taken her part.

They have been heard to threaten him on her account. Dwight, who was married and lived with his wife in a house on his father’s farm, took away with him two suits of clothes, but young Davenport is not known to have carried away only such clothes as he happened to have on, and left behind a little money and a bank book.

Wed. aft. upwards of 50 men were out scouring the woods of Coleraine, Whitingham and Heath, under Officers Henry A. Howard of Coleraine and Deputy Sheriff [?] S. Frost of Shelburne Falls, and the search by some of the party was kept up all night, but was fruitless. Dwight and Davenport are both familiar with the woods for miles around, having hunted and roamed over them together.

http://www.franklins...hotossmcleodpond.php

It was thought that perhaps the fugitives had gone in the direction of North Adams, and an officer was sent there Thurs. morning, while the general search was partly abandoned. Though the young ruffians may evade their pursuers for a while, it is hardly possible to make a successful escape. Their photographs and descriptions will be sent broadcast. The Selectmen have offered a reward of $500 for their recovery, and mean to bring them to justice.

As there is no coroner in the vicinity, S.D. Bardwell Esq. of Shelburne Falls, as a Justice of the Peace, summoned a jury to view the remains. The jury consists of Hezekiah Smith, C.W. Shattuck, A.A. Smith, Thomas D. Purrington, H.C. Millington and Russell J. Smith. They visited the scene of the murder Wed. aft., and will meet again today, when probably a verdict in accordance with the facts we have related will be rendered.

Farnsworth’s funeral took place Thurs. morning and was largely attended by the people of the town. Rev. Mr. Cole, the Methodist clergyman of Coleraine, conducted the services. Farnsworth leaves a boy of 9 and a girl of 7. His age was about 35, and his mother, with whom he lived, is about 75. The family, though poor and ignorant, were considered of average respectability. The mother of the Davenport boy has always opposed his keeping company with Dwight, who is generally supposed to have been the leader in the matter, but the two were together a great deal, and had become hardened and desperate.

A note received by J.B. Clark, one of the Selectmen of the town on Sat., stated that there was no trace then of the murderers, but that the watch supposed to have been stolen by one of the boys, was found, and was in his possession.

Latest - Intelligence from Shelburne Falls yesterday, states that Dwight was caught about half past 10 Sat. eve. Half a dozen men were laying in wait for him around his house, and he came home at that time and fell into their clutches. The whereabouts of Davenport is not known. Dwight was put into the lock-up at Shelburne Falls yesterday morning.

[A followup to this murder can be found on p. 371 of Google Books "Publications of the American Statistical Association", 1892 - 1893. There is also mention of the sentence on p. 5 of Google Books "Public Documents of Massachusetts", 1876].
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Crime, Criminals, Economics, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Greenfield (MA), History, Households, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Lost and Found, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Missing Persons, Mourning Customs, Murder, Names, Photographs, Police, Poor, Prisons

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Greenfield -

Greenfield - Trial Justice Brainard disposed of the following cases last week: Michael Moran, who took wood from Millers Falls, the property of Oselo Goodnow, was fined $2 and costs, from which he appealed. James Dwyer, Whitney Barden, Horatio Cutler and David Buffum of Montague City, were arrested for assaulting Abner Avery, and were fined $5 and one fourth of the costs each, which amounted to $8.92.

John McIves, one of the Bardwell’s Ferry roughs, was arrested by P.M. Fitzgerald for drunkenness, fined $5 and costs, which if not paid within 3 days, he was to take 20 days in the House of Correction. Dennis Brown for assault on Michael O’Neil, was brought in by Sheriff Swan of Shelburne Falls, and fined $8 and costs. Justice Davis discharged Patrick Mahaney of Cheapside, who was brought up for drunkenness, and fined John McIves $2 and costs - $4.95, who was picked up drunk by night policeman Carbee.
 

Subjects: Courts, Crime, Criminals, Drunkenness, Economics, Gangs, Greenfield (MA), Millers Falls (MA), Montague (MA), Police, Prisons, Robbers and Outlaws, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Trains, Transportation, Trees

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
A child on the witness stand

Little Walter Ross, brother of the missing Charlie Ross, was on the stand in the Westervelt (brother of the person who abducted Charley Ross [sic] but who was shot for burglary) trial at Philadelphia on Tues. He is about 7 years old, intelligent, and told his story in his own way with very little questioning. His evidence was as follows:

"I live in Germantown, on Washington lane; on the afternoon of July 1, Charlie went out with me into the lane and we were playing; two men came along and spoke to us; they were riding; they heard us shooting fire crackers up in the yard, and they said didn’t we want to go and buy some; and Charlie said he wanted to go and buy some and then the men asked us to get in; they lifted Charlie in and then I got in; they drove up the lane and then drove up toward Limekiln pike; before we got in they said they were going to take us to get some fire crackers.

I was between the two men and Charlie was sitting on one of the men’s lap; we went down Limekiln Pike down to Church Lane; then they turned up a great high hill and then turned up another street, and then they stopped at a hotel and got Charlie and me a drink; then they stopped in a street at the corner; they gave me money and I went in the buy the firecrackers; Charlie was in the carriage; I bought the fire crackers and came out of the store and then the buggy was gone.

A man came along and asked where I lived, and I said on Washington Lane; he asked me if it was in Washington and I said no, it was in Germantown; he asked if I wanted to go to the station house and I said no; I wanted to go home, and he took me home; I met my father in the lane coming up; while we were riding in the buggy Charlie cried a little, and the men said we were going to buy fire crackers now; Charlie said before he got in he wanted torpedoes; the men said they were going to buy the fire crackers at Juliann’s.

There was a red striped cover in this buggy; they had it spread over Charlie and all of us; Charlie rode all the time on the man’s lap; I had seen these two men before the day they took us away in the wagon; I had seen them twice before that and talked with them; when I saw them before that, they were riding in a buggy; they gave us candy first; they gave us candy twice before they took us away; they were right in front of Mr. Boutelier’s place; they were on the other side of the road from me, and they said Halloo; I did not see the buggy that day; that was in the afternoon when we were going to Sunday School...

The day they give us candy I took it up to Papa and told him that the man gave us candy; there were two new houses building opposite our house last summer; there was nothing said by the men about the houses at any time; one of the men had his nose up this way (pushing the end of his own nose upward); and the other had it down; the one whose nose was up had a cut on his nose, and the other had a mustache, which was red, and his hair as red; one man had on black pants and a light jacket; the pocket went below his knees; the other had on black pants and black jacket".

[For more information see Charley Ross in Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: Barber / Hair, Beverages, Children, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Economics, Family, Fires, Food, Germans, Holidays, Hotels, Households, Kidnapping, Literature / Web Pages, Police, Religion, Roads, Robbers and Outlaws, Stores, Retail, Transportation, Vendors and Purchasers, Architecture / Construction, Clothing

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - Aug. 3 John Collins, a railroad laborer from Bardwell's Ferry, had over 40 dollars stolen from him by a fellow laborer while he was asleep under an apple tree. The thief was finally arrested and locked up. The next day about $30 was recovered.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, Dreams / Sleep, Economics, Food, Police, Prisons, Robbers and Outlaws, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Trains, Transportation, Trees, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - Several parties have been arrested for fast driving on the suspension bridge recently, and one of them paid a fine of $2 for it.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Bridges, Crime, Criminals, Economics, Horses, Montague (MA), Police, Transportation, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
The town of Rowe

(Rowe) It is well known among botanists that many notable plants grow on sterile soil, so from some of our small and sequestered country towns have come many of our now prominent and useful men. I well remember when a boy, of living in the town of Rowe 40 years ago, just how it appeared.

I was a poor farmer’s boy, at work on a farm for wages, at 12 dollars per month. I had been well schooled in the village schools of the time, but they said "there was to be a select school in the center of the town, to be taught by Mr. John Wells, a son of Hon. Noah Wells of Rowe, who had just graduated at Williamstown, taking the highest honors in his class".

John succeeded in getting a large class, made up of the young ladies and gentlemen of his native town. I was a pupil among the others, and here I wish to say that a more successful school was never taught by any man. John Wells was then a young man, tall, straight as an arrow, with a beautiful face, and an expression like a modest girl. At the close of the school, we had an exhibition in the old Unitarian Church. It was filled to overflowing, and all the scholars took a part. The whole thing was a great success for Mr. Wells and a credit to his pupils.

The succeeding winter I taught the "winter school" in the center of the town, having among my scholars a small boy, the son of Rev. William Stearns, named George Stearns. George was a bright, blue-eyed boy of about 10 years old, good, but very mischievous. I gave him his first lesson in Latin grammar. I well remember how he used to recite in such a way as to make fun for the other scholars.

Well, Mr. John Wells is now Hon. John Wells of the Supreme court; and little Georgie Stearns is the celebrated Springfield lawyer, one of the most eminent of his profession in the State. The following year I taught a school in the north west part of the town, in a little "hut of a school house", and among my scholars was a little boy by the name of Noah Cressy.

[See Google Books "American Law Review: 1875 - 1876" for a long biographical entry on John Wells].

[See Google Books "Second annual report on the diseases of the domestic animals in Connecticut" by Noah Cressy].

There were 3 brothers of the Cressy family living in the district, and their children constituted the greater part of the school. the following year I went away to study medicine, and lost sight of little Noah, and the next I heard of him he was "Professor Noah Cressy of the Massachusetts Agricultural college, and veterinary surgeon to the State of Connecticut".

A chum went with me from Rowe to study medicine in the same office with me, the office of Moses Barrett M.D., located in the town of Charlemont. Dr. Barrett was a native of Rowe and had studied medicine and graduated with high honors. My chum was C.K. Fiske of Rowe, who graduated with me at the Berkshire Medical college in 1842. Dr. Fiske became an eminent dentist and settled in St. Johns, New Brunswick.

The late Major Reed, sheriff of this county, was for a long time a merchant in Rowe, if not born there. He had a son by the name of Samuel Reed, a scholar in my school, who afterward studied medicine, graduated, started for California, and died on the passage.

I frequently meet Prof. Cressy. He is a wide awake, congenial, friendly man, but eminently learned in his profession. Last week we exchanged some books, I giving him Harris on Insects, and he giving me "The Elements of General and Pathological Anatomy" by David Craige, M.D., published in Edinburg in 1828.

On the fly leaf is this, written in pencil: "To Dr. Craige, belongs the merit of having written the first distinct and comprehensive work on general anatomy" signed George Gulliver, M.D. There is probably not more than one or two other works of the kind and edition in this country. David Rice, M.D.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Children, Connecticut, Courts, Diseases, Economics, Education, Emigration and Immigration, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, History, Insects, Jokes, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Medicine / Hospitals, Obituaries, Police, Poor

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

(Greenfield) George Woodard, son of Elbridge G. Woodard, was arrested by Officer Bryant on Sat. and brought before Judge Conant for stealing a gun and powder flask at the tool shop, the property of Simeon Phillips, last March. The robbery was traced to the boy who is 11 years old a few days ago. His case was continued until Wed. noon, to permit the presence of a member of the State Board, who look after juvenile offenders.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Children, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Government, Greenfield (MA), Juvenile Delinquents, Massachusetts, Police, Robbers and Outlaws, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

(Greenfield) John Collins, Charles Warren, Peter Quinn, Thomas McCarty and William Howard, were participators in a grand drunk and knock down out at Bardwell's Ferry. Officers H.S. Swan and J.G. Brown "lit" into them and arrested the first 3 for drunkenness, McCarty for assault, and Howard for resistance, and lodged the whole pack in our jail. At Justice Brainard's court on Mon. the former were fined $12.00 each, McCarty $14.50 and Howard $14.15.
 

Subjects: Courts, Crime, Criminals, Drunkenness, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Police, Prisons, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Transportation

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Foreign



A box was found a few days since in a water course near Windsor Castle, containing 125 false keys to the royal jewel rooms. It has been satisfactorily proved that the box and contents were part of a plan to steal the royal jewels. The keys were found to fit the locks exactly. It has not been found out by what means the bold plan was baffled, or how the box came to be found in proximity to the castle. The case is under investigation.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, English (and England), Households, Lost and Found, Police, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Robbers and Outlaws, Royalty, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Murder will out

A French detective's story. [Long]
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, French, Literature / Web Pages, Police

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Turners Falls

(Turners Falls) John Morrison and George Dunbar have been appointed night policemen.
 

Subjects: Montague (MA), Police, Turners Falls (MA), Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

Officer Kimball was called upon Fri. aft. to take into custody Jim Bowers, living near the Cheapside Bridge, who was drunk and abusing his wife. Jim made some noisy demonstrations when called upon by the officer, but was finally jailed. Justice Davis continued his case on the complaint of drunkenness, and put him under bonds of $100 to keep the peace 6 months.
 

Subjects: Bridges, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Deerfield (MA), Drunkenness, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Noise, Police, Prisons, Wife Abuse

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News about town: Greenfield items



A desperate plan was laid by two of Greenfield’s young roughs, to burglarize Charles Keith’s grocery store last Wed. eve. About 11 o’clock in the eve. Miles Mowry, a clerk employed in the store, accompanied by E.S. Seaver, cutter for Seward & Willard, had occasion to go into the store. In the dark Mowry stumbled over someone secreted behind the counter. He at first thought it one of the other clerks trying to play a joke on him, but dragging the fellow out, he proved to be Jerry McAuliffe, the boy who, two years ago, broke into the store then kept by Mrs. S.F. Warner.

He served an 18 month’s sentence in the House of Correction at Pittsfield, and returned to Greenfield July 17th. Mowry and Seaver took McAuliff into the street and delivered him over to night policemen Jones and Carbee. McAuliff, when arrested, had a long dirk knife in his hand, the sheath of which was found in his pocket. It was not suspected at the time that there was another burglar in the store, and so it was locked and left for the night.

It leaked out the next day, when McAuliff was brought before Justice Brainard, that he was not alone. Another fellow, he said, cut a light from the back window with a diamond, through which they both got into the store, and it was their intention to open the safe, his comrade having the necessary tools. The fellow, he said, was not 4 ft. from him when he was taken from behind the counter, and he had a revolver cocked ready to shoot anyone who took hold of him.

McAuliff would not tell the boy’s name, but from what the Justice pumped out of him, it was suspected that Willard Gillett, employed about the Mansion House, was the second burglar, and he was accordingly arrested. Gillett denied the whole thing at once, but owned up little by little, and finally pleaded guilty to the charge of breaking and entering the store, with the intention of opening the safe to obtain money.

His trunk at the Mansion House was searched and in it was found a seven shooter loaded with six charges, capped and ready for execution, a long sheath knife, a policeman’s "billy", a hatchet, a diamond for cutting glass, a chisel, etc., beside some boxes of cigars and a few articles that are supposed to have been stolen. The magistrate bound each of the boys over to the Nov. court in the sum of $500.

Gillett was at one time employed by Dr. Severance, who now recollects numerous things that turned up missing while he was around the house. He afterward worked in Field & Hall’s printing office, but found he hadn’t a taste for that kind of work and so gave it up. A "form" of type was found in his trunk, from which he had probably printed some obscene literature for the benefit of his boy companions. He was certainly equipped for burglary on an extensive scale.

The wonder is, that with one of these boys armed with a dirk knife, and the other a pistol, they did not assault Mowry and Seaver when they entered the store. Had Mowry been alone, he might have had ugly treatment at their hands. McAuliff is 17 and Gillett 18.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Economics, Food, Glass / Windows, Greenfield (MA), Hotels, Jokes, Juvenile Delinquents, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Names, Police, Prisons, Roads, Robbers and Outlaws, Sex Crimes, Smoking and Tobacco, Stores, Retail, War / Weaponry, Words, Work

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News of the week

The death of Mrs. Magoon, which occurred at Raymond, N.H. some little time ago and concerning which there has been some suspicion, proves to have been a case of poisoning. Mr. Magoon and a woman named Gardner are under arrest.
 

Subjects: Crime, Criminals, Marriage and Elopement, New Hampshire, Poisoning, Police, Women

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 17, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Lake Pleasant

The Spiritualist campmeeting, though on the whole orderly and conducted with decorum, has witnessed one or two little episodes the past week that were for the time unpleasant. One of the sisterhood took occasion to publicly charge upon a man and woman unbecoming conduct. The parties accused demanded satisfaction upon the spot; officers were called, and there was talk of legal proceedings, but the disturbance was finally quelled and balm applied to the wounded. On the eve. of the moonlight excursion to the lake, a fellow insulted a lady in the pavilion, and her husband who was by gave him a severe chastisement. The police, however, have made few arrests, and these were of outsiders who tried to create disturbance.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Dance, Lake Pleasant (MA), Law and Lawyers, Montague (MA), Police, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Seduction, Women, Words

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 17, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 23, 1875
Montague

The camp meeting cannot be without some slight effect upon us. Whether it is the great amount of travel, or for the sake of showing people that "competition is the life of business", that has developed two lines of coaches between here and the camp ground, we do not know. R.N. Clapp runs a branch store there, and we hope he may do well. Postmaster Chenery spends most of his time on the grounds, being among the number of police; and for the accommodation of the campers, has obtained leave from Washington, to deliver mails from his branch office, and receive them off the cars at the lake. We express a hope too, that our landlord, Wildes, may have a busy time during campmeeting. He has already received several summer boarders.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Hotels, Lake Pleasant (MA), Mail, Montague (MA), Police, Religion, Stores, Retail, Trains, Transportation, Vacations


Powered by manager.webworksserver.com