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Revised list of topics
Revised list of topics

Revised Jan. 10, 2009

Welcome to the list of topics. You can call them subject headings or tags - they offer you another method of searching the Franklin County Publication Archive site. Interested in accident victims in Athol? Click on the tag below for Accident Victims and find a list of articles dating from Jan. 1, 1870 to August , 1875. Once on the page of articles, then use your Find command to  pull up all articles mentioning Athol.

The search engine is being revamped by the wonderful and highly overworked Mik Muller. Once it is completed, you will be able to search for multiple subjects or terms by simply dividing terms with a comma in the search box. Example: Jones, Deerfield, Births   That should give you a nice listing of all Joneses born in Deerfield during the time period mentioned above. Another way to search it will be to choose the terms Deerfield and Births from the drop down box and add Jones to the search box. Voila!

ACCIDENT VICTIMS     Here reside the fatalities, not the regular every day deaths. Industrial accidents, drownings, death by fire, train, loose circus animals, accidental shootings, and freak accidents.


ACCIDENTS
     Much more run of the mill stuff here, and not even fatal, at least in most cases. Many of these articles concern runaway horses, falls and narrow escapes.

ADVERTISING
   One of my favorite sections. Classified ads are also included here.

AFRICAN AMERICANS / BLACKS
   Everything is covered here. Articles deal with slavery, racism, lynchings, and the like, but it is noteworthy to see that many articles are not racist in content.

AMUSEMENTS  is kind of a catch-all, but primarily concerns fun stuff done for amusement - picnics, parades, croquet games, tableaux, taffy pulling, sleigh rides, masquerade parties, sociables, shadow pantomimes - you get the idea.

ANIMALS / REPTILES  From the barnyard to the circus, to the hunted, to cats and dogs. Horses have their own category. I regret now that I did not create a subject heading for cruelty to animals, but those articles are also included here.

ARABS  Exotic stuff here. Turkey, Palestine, harems, whirling dervishes, reflecting the fascination for the Middle East and all its customs and traditions in the 1870s.

ARCHAEOLOGY
  is a mixed bag of accidental findings - like the dinosaur footprints in the Connecticut River bed in Turners Falls, to old burial sites of Native Americans [which were treated with appalling lack of respect]. "Humbugs" like the Cardiff giant are also included here, as well as accidental finding of treasure.

ARCHITECTURE / CONSTRUCTION  Styles of buildings, as well as the building of houses, larger buildings, bridges, train tracks, etc.

ART    contains the sublime, and the mundane. Famous statues and portraits are always being commissioned. It was also during this time period that art classes began to be required in the schools.

ASHFIELD, MA

ASSASSINATION
    Post Lincoln.

ASTRONOMY   Rare astronomical events, aurora borealis, miracles, meteors, solar eclipses - and the more mundane, references to the sun, moon, stars, planets, etc.

ATHOL, MA

BARBER / HAIR 
   includes not only the establishment itself, but also all references to hair, wigs, bald heads, medicine to grow hair, hair dyes, etc.

BARS (DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS)
   Pretty much portrayed as den of iniquities. The Gazette & Courier is very much pro temperance.

BERKSHIRE COUNTY, MA

BERNARDSTON, MA

BEVERAGES
   Anything drinkable. Includes water, milk, soda, coffee, tea, cider, as well as beer, liquor, etc.

BICYCLES AND BICYCLING - The craze hasn’t hit yet.  When it does, though, we’re on top of it!

BIRDS   All kinds of birds, many articles related to hunting. Hen stories abound as well, with some hens laying eggs that are 8 inches wide! [I pity the poor bird].

BIRTH CONTROL
   A really sad section, since birth control in this time period only relates to mothers killing their newborns, to botched illegal abortions, etc.

BIRTHS
   Are prolific. Many names, usually only of the proud father, are repeated each year. Of course the matching obituaries contain many of these infants as well. All cases of multiple births worldwide are listed.

BOSTON

BRIDGES
   Free bridges, toll bridges, railroad bridges, etc.

BUSINESS ENTERPRISES
   Any new business, old business, capitalist venture, etc. is covered.

BUSINESSPEOPLE
    Women are people too!

CANADA

CANALS - past their heydey (1830’s and 40’s) but still around and of interest.

CARICATURES AND CARTOONS - Haven’t started yet but I am awaiting them with great anticipation.

CEMETERIES

CHARITY   One of the main reasons fraternal clubs and organizations came into being.

CHARLEMONT, MA

CHILD ABUSE
  Only the very worst cases ever make it into print.

CHILDREN - They’re everywhere of course - families are huge, 15 children being a normal size. But the youth culture has not taken hold - one mostly hears about children having accidents or dying, or around Christmas time, or in school.

CHINA AND CHINESE   None locally as yet, but plenty of interest in the national news.

CIRCUS - One of my favorite sections. The hype, the sound, the fun! The ads are exceptional.

CLUBS   There are clubs for everything; they serve a major community function. Remember, no TV’s, no radios, etc.

COAL

COLERAINE (NOW COLRAIN), MA

CONNECTICUT

CONNECTICUT RIVER - The important one. All others are in one section entitled RIVERS.

CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES - Hasn’t dawned on them too much, even though they are familiar with Thoreau’s work.

CONTESTS
   Base ball games (we call ’em baseball) becoming popular. Bets and wagers always a part of our society. We’ve got walking contests, horse races, tobacco stripping contests, girls splitting hard wood slabs, which hen can lay the biggest egg, who can grow the tallest corn stalk, etc.

CONWAY, MA

COSMETICS
- Soaps, hairdyes, perfumes, face creams, etc.

COURTS  One of the largest sections. Look here for all criminal activity.

COURTSHIP
- The path of true love did not run smoothly, even in the old days. Poems and stories abound, even personal ads (very high-toned ones, of course). Murders and scandals are not uncommon, as well.

CRIME
- Ah crime! There’s some of everything here, some of it salacious, much of it fines for drunkenness.

CRIMINALS
- Not everyone who commits a crime is a criminal. I reserved this area for people like serial poisoners, bank robbers, desperados, outlaws [like Red-Handed Dick and Henry Berry Lowery].

CULTS - Oh yes, they existed back then, and were just as troublesome. Read about Adventists, proponents of Free Loveism, Millerism, the Shakers, the Christian Israelites, the Nazarites, and the Howling Dervishes [Hmm, great name for a rock band].

CURIOSITIES AND WONDERS
is a great catchall section, and one of my favorites [of course]. Here you will read about human and animal abnormalities - a youth with three legs and four feet, a lizard living in a man’s stomach, a three horned and three eyed ox, a living skeleton, a four legged chicken - well, you get the idea ;-).

CUTLERY AND CUTLERY TRADE
- Very important to Greenfield and Turners Falls history.


DANCE - Many kinds of dancing available for the young and the old. From Balls to Belly Dancers.

DEERFIELD, MA

DISASTERS
- We always have them. However, they don’t have the immediacy that they do nowadays in today’s news. Read about the great Chicago fire of 1871, the great Boston fire of 1872, shipwrecks, earthquakes, floods and explosions.

DISEASES - We’ve got a million of ’em.

DIVORCE
- the Court makes you jump through hoops, wait years, etc., but divorces do happen.

DREAMS AND SLEEP - Sleep and sleep disorders also included here.

DRUG ABUSE
- From sulphuric ether, to tobacco, chloral, opium and laudanum.

DRUGSTORES

DRUNKENNESS

ECONOMICS - Not one of my favorite subjects, but you will find here any articles about money, banks, every day economics, etc.

EDUCATION
- a special place for UMass, then the Agricultural College.

ELECTIONS - only the major ones.

EMIGRATION AND IMMIGRATION - New England still pretty unhomogenous, but there are sections about German, Chinese and Irish migrations.

ENGLISH (AND ENGLAND)
- Still a strong connection to the homeland.

ERVING (MA)

ETIQUETTE - Always a topic of interest for the Victorians.

EUROPE

EXECUTIONS AND EXECUTIONERS - A morbid but interesting section.

EXPLORERS - A great time period for exploration. We have Dr. Livingston, Arctic explorers, and more.

EYE - Blindness, accidents, eyeglasses, sore eyes, etc.

FAIRS - held bout once a week - the favorite moneymaker of the women’s church groups. Then there’s the County Fairs, which are covered as thoroughly as possible.

FAMILY - Family reunions, loving families, insane families, incest, and more. Very useful for genealogists.

FARMERS AND FARMING - A hot topic in the 19th century. Also covers tobacco and fertilizers.

FASHION
- A fun section. Sunbonnets, French kid gloves, waterproof dress goods, garters, corsets, wigs, demi-trains, false insteps, shawls, plaid poplins, striped stockings, chignons, Chinese grass cloth, kilting, etc.

FIRES - There are so many, and so few ways to put them out, that it’s a wonder that any buildings survived the 19th century at all. I had to be very exclusive, and only cover those fires of local and international interest.

FISHES AND FISHING - You can get a barrel of oysters delivered right to your door, andthey are "the" Sunday breakfast.

FLOODS - Also quite prevalent.

FOOD - For the gourmet and the every day eater. This section is large and all inclusive. Includes some recipes and all restaurant ads.

FREEMASONRY - A group deserving of their own section.

FRENCH
- Many influences here, from the Mansard or "French" roofs, stationary, corsets, pottery, jewelry, the Franco-Prussian War, etc.

FURNITURE
- Wooden items, [and what wood! Black walnut, solid ash, walnut, chestnut] beds and sofas [occasionally covered with haircloth], and some interesting articles about Gardner, Mass., the "chair capital of the world".

GAMBLING - One of the oldest vices. Chinese gambling houses, dog-pits, bets, every day chance taking.

GANGS - Not the Bloods and the Crips, but the homegrown Tough End boys, roughs and rowdies, brigands and juvenile delinquents.

GARBAGE - Remember that this is pre-plastic (in most respects) and that the necessity for community trash dumps is not an issue yet. Most, or all farmers, keep an iron and glass scrap heap somewhere in the back forty - a practice which still occurs today. Some articles do concern garbage - rubbish littering the streets, a city without sewers, ash barrels, etc.

GAYS - ah, this is a tough but rewarding section, where I’ve had to "read between the lines" quite a bit. Included here are men who dressed as women, and women who dressed as men [with the understanding that, especially in women’s cases, this could have been done for economic and other reasons]. Famous figures like Oscar Wilde, Susan B. Anthony and Anna Dickinson are the meat and potatoes of this section.

GEOGRAPHY
- one of the more recent additions, includes topographical surveys, maps, tourist type articles, etc.

GERMANS - Nice to see this ethnic group portrayed in such a positive light. Local Germans are hard working, athletic, happy, beer drinkers who do not get drunk, like to compete in gymnastic contests, love to dance, etc.

GILL (MA)

GLASS - a particular favorite of mine, since I dig for, and collect old glass embossed bottles. Bottles, window glass, demi-johns, looking glasses, etc. As time allows, I will scan in some of my "dug" antique bottles for your viewing pleasure.

GOVERNMENT
- usually Presidents, Congress, and taxes, new states and territories. Many other government related articles will be found under POLITICS.

GRANGE, NATIONAL

GREENFIELD (MA)

GYPSIES - always a few passing through, telling fortunes, trading horses, stealing chickens, and kidnapping local children.

HAMPSHIRE & HAMPDEN COUNTIES (MA)    A catch all section for all those towns not privileged to be in Franklin County, and yet covered fairly thoroughly here. So look for articles on Amherst, Northampton, and the Massachusetts Agricultural College (the earlier name of the University of Massachusetts).

HANDICAPPED - the blind, the deaf, the lame, the insane - all find a home here. Cork legs, poor houses and alms-houses, deformed infants, hunchbacks, etc.

HAWLEY (MA)

HEATH (MA)

HERITAGE ACTIVITIES - will come into their own a little later. For now, centennial celebrations are included here.

HISPANICS - another catchall heading. Latin American activities, as well as Spanish Peninsular items. This subject heading will probably be combined with LATIN AMERICA eventually.

HISTORY - well, it’s all history to us, right? But included here are items which were of historic interest to the inhabitants of the 1870’s - the early days of Greenfield, Deerfield, and Montague; the founding of historical organizations, like the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, and genealogical family histories.

HOLIDAYS - not much different from today’s celebrations. Of course the 4th of July was a maelstrom of fireworks and severed limbs, and Christmas advertising did not occur untilthe two issues before Dec. 25th. Sabbath Schools all had their holiday celebrations, complete with Christmas trees and a song fest, and Valentine’s Day had already started its decline into ignorant and joke cards. Washington’s birthday, All Fool’s Day, May Day, Thanksgiving, New Year’s Day, and Memorial Day are all represented. No sign of Halloween yet.

HOOSAC TUNNEL (MA)
is rapidly nearing completion. Read about the 19th century version of the "Big Dig".

HORSES
- I find this section absolutely fascinating. The vital importance of horses for all transportation needs is clearly shown, especially during the "Horse Disease"(Epizootic) of 1872. You either rassled up an oxen or goat, or you walked - in those places not accessible by train, of course.

HOTELS - There’s not that many of them, but they know how to do it up in style, and are a vital part of the town’s culture. This is the era when enormous resort hotels are springing up, and the concept of vacations are taking hold in the middle and upper classes.

HOUSEHOLDS
is a broad subject; I mainly went by the rule of thumb of what occurred inside a dwelling. Houses were the domain of women, and so items made specifically for women, like sewing machines, find a home here. Hints on cookery and thrift, as well as kitchen appliances also find a home here ;-). Ah yes, the world of washing, ironing, canning, and child rearing.

HUNGARIANS - Why the Hungarians, you say? Well, this is one of those personal interest type headings, since I am half Hungarian.

ICE - a big business, back in the days of pre-refrigeration. Ice was "harvested" from local lakes, and kept cool in warehouses, to be sold in blocks throughout the warm months. Also included here are frozen over rivers and ponds, ice skating, and ice used for drinks and preserving food.

INSANITY

INSECTS

INVENTIONS

IRISH

ITALIANS

JAPANESE

JEWELRY

JEWS

JOKES

JUVENILE DELINQUENTS

KIDNAPPING

LABOR UNIONS, ORGANIZING

LAKE PLEASANT (MA)

LATIN AMERICA

LAW AND LAWYERS

LEVERETT (MA)

LEYDEN (MA)

LIBRARIES AND LIBRARIANS

LIGHT

Jun 30, 2022
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Bernardston (MA)

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 21, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Births

Born in Bernardston Aug. 30, a daughter to Charles K. Jenkins and Eunice A. Jenkins; Sept. 15, a son, Fervin Bascom Hale, to A.D. Hale and grand-son to E.L. Bascom of Gill.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Births, Family, Gill (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 23, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Died

Chapin, Gorham, age 1, son of Albert Chapin, died of cholera infantum in Bernardston on Sept. 10.

[A couplet appears at the end of the obituaries: "Too pure for earth / Has gone to heaven"].
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Diseases, Obituaries, Poetry, Religion

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Died

Thompson, Mrs. Eunice, age 68, died in Bernardston on Sept. 10.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Obituaries

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Probate Court Record

Probate court Record - Greenfield - Administration granted on estates of George W. Bardwell of Deerfield, Jane F. Bardwell and Cyrus A. Stowell, Adm'rs.; Jeremiah Dow of Erving, Edmund M. Dow of Erving, Adm'r.; Joseph M. Townsend of Coleraine, Sarah Townsend of Coleraine, Adm'r.

Wills proved - Samuel Alexander of Northfield, George P. Alexander of Northfield, Ex'r.; Sarah Cook of Greenfield, John J. Graves and R.W. Cook of Greenfield, Ex'rs.; Ansel C. Delano of Sunderland, Jesse L. Delano and Edward A. Delano of Sunderland, Ex'rs.; Moses Hubbard of Sunderland, Cyrus M. Hubbard of Sunderland, Adm'r. with the will annexed.

Accounts rendered - on estates of William W. Alcott of Bernardston, Clark Ellis of New Salem, Clarissa Battle of Orange, Mary J. Gore of Monroe, Harriet M. Brown of Greenfield, A.M. Kingman of Deerfield, George S. Boyd of Deerfield.

License granted to sell real estate - Of John Arms of Gill, Andrew Welch of Montague, Walter D. Thompson of Troy, Ohio.

Widows' allowance - Made in estates of Rufus S. Phillips of Greenfield, $500; Edward Thayer of Greenfield, $9018.

Affidavits filed - in estate of Charles S. Brown of Greenfield, Baxter Harding of Conway, P. May Buddington of Greenfield, Rufus S. Phillips of Greenfield, Moses Field of Leverett.

Estate of Ephraim Murdock, late of Orange, represented insolvent, H. Woodward and G.A. Whipple, Commissioners.

Commissioners' report filed in estate of John Haskins, late of Shutesbury. Distribution ordered in estate of George S. Boyd, late of Deerfield.

John Quinton of Greenfield adopted infant child of William H. Seley; name changed to John George L. Quinton. Name of Flora M. Reynolds of Shutesbury changed to Flora M. Freeman. Next Probate Court at Northfield next Tues. (tomorrow).
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Conway (MA), Courts, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Erving (MA), Gill (MA), Greenfield (MA), Law and Lawyers, Leverett (MA), Montague (MA), Mourning Customs, Names, New Salem (MA), Northfield (MA), Orange (MA), Sales, Shutesbury (MA), Sunderland (MA), Widows and Widowers, Women, Monroe (MA)

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 11, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Died

Hale, S. Truman, age 46, formerly of Bernardston, died in East Glenville, N.Y. on Aug. 31.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Emigration and Immigration, Obituaries

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 8, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
Population

The population of Franklin county, as returned by the late census, and also that of 1865, is as follows:

Ashfield, 1188, 1875; 1221, 1865
Bernardston, 991, 1875; 902, 1865
Buckland, 1921, 1875; 1922, 1865
Charlemont, 1029, 1875; 994, 1865
Coleraine, 1699, 1875; 1726, 1865
Conway, 1452, 1875; 1538, 1865
Deerfield, 3414, 1875; 3038, 1865
Erving, 749, 1875; 576, 1865
Gill, 673, 1875; 635, 1865
Greenfield, 3540, 1875; 3211, 1865
Hawley, 588, 1875; 687, 1865
Heath, 545, 1875; 642, 1865
Leverett, 821, 1875; 914, 1865
Leyden, 521, 1875; 592, 1865
Montague, 3379, 1875; 1574, 1865
Monroe, 191, 1875; 190, 1865
New Salem, 923; 1116, 1865
Northfield, 1641, 1875; 1660, 1865
Orange, 2497, 1875; 1909, 1865
Rowe, 661, 1875; 563, 1865
Shelburne, 1586, 1875; 1564, 1865
Shutesbury, 558, 1875; 768, 1865
Sunderland, 845, 1875; 861, 1865
Warwick, 733, 1875; 901, 1865
Wendell, 503, 1875; 603, 1865
Whately, 545, 1875; 1012, 1865
 

Subjects: Ashfield (MA), Bernardston (MA), Buckland (MA), Charlemont (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Conway (MA), Deerfield (MA), Erving (MA), Gill (MA), Greenfield (MA), Leverett (MA), Montague (MA), New Salem (MA), Northfield (MA), Orange (MA), Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Shutesbury (MA), Sunderland (MA), Vital Statistics, Warwick (MA), Wendell (MA), Whately (MA), Leyden (MA), Heath (MA), Hawley (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

(Greenfield) S.L. Shattuck cut out of his farm, on the Bernardston road, formerly of the Samuel Pierce farm, at the first crop, 3 tons on a single acre, and at the second crop, 2 tons. Can any one tell of a better product? The first crop was cut the 1st of July and the second the 30th of August
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Contests, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA)

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Bernardston

(Bernardston) Three car loads of the people of Florence picnicked here last Sat. They brought a good band and had a good time.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Bernardston (MA), Food, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Music, Trains

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Bernardston

(Bernardston) Mrs. Scott, wife of the proprietor of the New England house, fell out of a hammock last week and broke her collar bone.
 

Subjects: Accidents, Amusements, Bernardston (MA), Hotels, New England, Women

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
An old story

The following was told me by the late Theodore Hoyt of Bernardston, father of Richard Hoyt. Mr. Hoyt’s father was Jonathan Hoyt, born in the old Indian House at Deerfield and son of landlord Hoyt. He built a house upon his father’s land at West Deerfield, probably around 1760, where he lived to old age, and sent out into the world a large family of children and grand-children. Here Mr. T. Hoyt was born.

The family were obliged to cross the Deerfield river to attend the public meetings of the town, and to the post office and store. Much of the time the river was crossed in a wooden canoe, which was kept near the old cemetery , as the river at this time was making its way very near its sacred enclosure, and it was feared that it would disturb the sleeping inmates.

Mr. Hoyt was returning from the village, and had entered a ravine on the farm now owned by Salmon Chapman, when a raccoon started up and ran. Mr. Hoyt went for him. He said in those days they did not let any thing disturb them. The raccoon ran under some rubbish and roots of trees, which he began to remove, when he saw a large copper kettle, which he thought was taken by the Indians from the village of King Philip’s time, or in 1704, and buried there.

The old kettle was taken home, but a large hole was found in it, making it unfit for use; but neighbor Deacon Jehiel Jones, grandfather of G.W. Jones and Charles Jones, gave him an old kettle to mend it with, and it did good service for many years. Near where the kettle was found, the Indians had a cemetery and an armory, or a spot for burying arrowheads and other war implements.

The Indians were mostly buried in a sitting posture. This brought the head near the top of the ground. Mr. Hoyt said, when they plowed this land, the plows would cut off and turn out the Indians’ skulls. Oh, what a harvest Mr. Sheldon and Dr. Hitchcock would have gathered from that field! - enough to have filled several shelves of their cabinet.

This farm was then owned by Mr. Hoyt’s brother, father of S.B. Hoyt of Bernardston. The present owner, Mr. Chapman, found deposited in a cavity, 60 or 70 arrow heads, showing it to be a place of deposit. These, we are sorry to say, fell under the eye of Dr. Hitchcock a little too soon after they were found, and are now deposited in the Indian cabinet at Amherst College, with a promise to be returned to Deerfield and deposited in the Memorial Hall when completed. (N. Hitchcock)
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Archaeology, Bernardston (MA), Births, Cemeteries, Deerfield (MA), Dreams / Sleep, Education, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, History, Hotels, Households, Lost and Found, Mail, Mourning Customs, Museums, Native Americans, Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Assn, Racism, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Royalty, Stores, Retail

Posted by stew - Tue, Jan 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Bernardston



The Bernardston Annual Union picnic, a fund for which was provided a few years ago by a munificent gentleman of New York, for the benefit of all the different Sunday schools in town, was held on Wed the 11th. The weather was favorable, the gathering of old and young quite large - between 500 and 600. The festive board was spread to profusion with every delicacy that could charm the eye or gratify the appetite, a power to charm peculiar to the Bernardston ladies, whose success in this direction cannot be outdone by anyone or ones of the feminine persuasion.

A blessing was prayed by Rev. Mr. Holmes of the Universalist society, after which the festival commenced very soon. Everything seemed to pass off quietly and joyously, and to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. A procession was formed in the morning at the town hall, under the direction of Lieut. E.S. Hulbert, and marched to the Grove escorted by the Bernardston Cornet Band, making a splendid appearance in their new uniforms. They also discoursed some sweet music at intervals through the day which added much pleasure to the occasion. This Band now numbers 21 pieces.

There was no public speaking by anyone through the day - no discussion of religious tenets or politics, but all such topics were given up for the full enjoyment of the Sunday school youth in their own innocent gayeties and childish amusements. This course was wisely suggested by Mr. Hale of New York, the generous donor to these Sunday schools, and this year it has been as wisely carried out.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Bernardston (MA), Charity, Children, Economics, Food, Music, Old Age, Politics, Religion, Weather, Women

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Mr. George Rockwood



Mr. George G. Rockwood, photographer of New York, is with his family at Bernardston for the summer. Mr. Rockwood is justly counted in the profession a very capable hand in making a flattering picture, so we excuse the following panegyric. He writes: "This region is the Eden of this country, an is now in its fullest glory. Magnificent old hills stand sentry over this peaceful, beautiful valley of the Connecticut, and drive or walk where you will, you are met with new, ever changing and surprisingly beautiful pictures. Paraphrasing Washington Irving, every Yankee thanks God he was born in New England". N.Y. Home Journal.

http://www.georgeroc...ockwoodbiography.htm
 

Subjects: Amusements, Bernardston (MA), Connecticut River, Family, Literature / Web Pages, New England, Photographs, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Vacations, Work

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Died

Temple, A.B., age 31, late of the firm of Slate & Temple, Southington, Ct., and son of D.W. Temple of Bernardston, died of consumption in Hinsdale, N.H. Aug. 3. Another loved one gone.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Connecticut, Diseases, New Hampshire, Obituaries

Posted by stew - Sat, Jan 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Died

Selman, Carrie M., age 25, wife of Charles A. Selman, died of typhoid fever in Bernardston on Aug. 8.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Diseases, Obituaries

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 30, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 9, 1875
Probate Court record

Greenfield, Aug. 3, 187 - Administration granted - on estate of Anna P. Alexander, late of Northfield, H. Alexander, Jr. of Springfield, Adm’r; Charles S. Brown, Greenfield, John J. Graves, Adm’r. de bonis non; Rufus S. Phillips, Greenfield, Sally Phillips and John P. Griswold of Greenfield, Adm’r.; Asa S. Ruddock, Buckland, Lee Baron D. Ruddock of Buckland, Adm’r.; Willard Ward, Orange; Asa A. Ward of Orange, Adm’r.

Wills proved - Martha S. Johnson, Coleraine, Morris Pierce of Coleraine, Ex’r.; Lyman Dickinson, Whately, Lyman M. Dickinson and Dennis Dickinson, Adm’rs. with will annexed; Baxter Harding, Conway, Mattie J. Harding of Conway, Ex’r.

Guardians appointed - Dennis Wilson, Coleraine, over Jennie V. Newell of Coleraine.

Accounts rendered - On estates of Philinda Bowman of Leverett, Chester Hinsdale of Monroe, Edward Jones of Leverett, Barnard Fisher of Warwick.

License granted - To sell real estate of Moses M. Huse of Leverett, Charles Pelton of Shelburne. Widow’s allowance - made in estate of Benjamin Tilton of Deerfield, $200.

Inventories filed - In estate of Hubert Morton, Shelburne, $872.78; Lyman Rice, Charlemont, $3129; Samuel R. Smith, Coleraine, $2658; Dexter Drake, Buckland, $18,051; Esther Dickinson, Deerfield, $72,271; Henry M. Fisk, Shelburne, $9858; Eli T. Green, Shelburne, $17,407.

Affidavits filed - In estate of Rebecca L. Burrows of Bernardston, George Childs of Leyden. Commissioners appointed - On insolvent estates of Charles S. Brown, Greenfield, R.A. Packard, R.W. Cook, Jonathan H. Cary, New Salem, R.D. Chase, Hiram Orcutt; Robert Richardson, Greenfield, Charles L. Lowell, F.G. Fessenden. Next Probate Court at Greenfield on the 1st Tues. of Sept.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Buckland (MA), Charlemont (MA), Children, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Conway (MA), Courts, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Family, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Law and Lawyers, Leverett (MA), Mourning Customs, New Salem (MA), Northfield (MA), Orange (MA), Orphans and Orphanages, Sales, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Warwick (MA), Whately (MA), Widows and Widowers, Leyden (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 20, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Bernardston

A substantial gravel walk is being made across Cushman Park, and when it is completed, as it was intended it should be by its generous and public spirited Testator, and the Cushman monument is removed there, or a soldier's monument is erected therein, it will be an ornament to the town, for which every citizen may feel justly proud. [The soldiers' monument was indeed erected, and will post a pic when I can find one].
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Parks, Roads, Statues, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 20, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Bernardston

The friends and neighbors of George W. Tyler were surprised and shocked Sun. morning, on learning of the sudden death of Mrs. Tyler the previous eve. On Sat. she was in the enjoyment of her usual health, attending to her household duties, and late in the aft. making calls upon her neighbors. But after returning she fell asleep to wake no more upon this earth, expiring before half past 11 o'clock and before medical assistance could be rendered.

Never was the lesson more impressively inforced [sic] "that we should also be ready". For the sympathy and kindness which were shown them in the hour of their affliction, Mr. Tyler and family desire thus publicly to express to their friends and neighbors their sincere and grateful thanks.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Dreams / Sleep, Family, Medical Personnel, Obituaries, Women, Work

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 20, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Bernardston

On Sun. a tramp visited the house of L. Willard Aldrich and stole a quantity of butter from the well. Mr. Aldrich happened to be at home, recovered his butter, and collaring the tramp, shook him until he hardly knew whether his head was on his shoulders or not. That tramp will not visit Mr. Aldrich's premises again.


 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Crime, Criminals, Food, Households, Robbers and Outlaws, Tramps

Posted by stew - Thu, Dec 18, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
Those good deacons

[A short article about deacons of Heath, Charlemont, Hawley, Ashfield, Shelburne, Deerfield and Bernardston, who have recently gone on to their final resting places].
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Charlemont (MA), Deerfield (MA), Obituaries, Religion, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Heath (MA), Hawley (MA)

Posted by stew - Tue, Dec 16, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 2, 1875
The Band Convention at Lake Pleasant

The great Band gathering at Lake Pleasant on Fri. attracted an immense crowd of people, one of the largest ever assembled there. Between 75 and 80 car loads of human beings disembarked from the trains, coming from nearly every town within a radius of 40 miles. Best judges estimated the no. of people at about ten thousand [!], which is about as many as should be packed together in one locality, if convenience and comfort are to be consulted.

[Believe me, this estimate is much too large!]

There was the usual delay and confusion incident to transporting so many people over the railroad, and it was nearly noon when the 18 bands were on the ground ready for business. The three hundred or more musicians were finally massed, the instruments of each class being placed together. But the concert was hardly satisfactory. Though each band had drilled upon the music selected, placing them together for the first time without any rehearsal was a mistake.

But there was another obstacle to the success of the concert for which the bands were in no was responsible. About 1/2 of the programme was omitted, and the leaders drew lots to decide the order of playing of each from the band stand. The following was the order settled upon and the names of the leaders of each band: Fitchburg, Russell; Mechanics of Orange, Ned Clapp; Haydenville, Henry Smith; Florence, David Shields; South Deerfield, James Clapp; Bernardston, N.S. Cutler; Monson, A.D. Norcross; Greenfield, Samuel Squier; Gardner Serenade, ___; Millers Falls, Henry Colburn; East Templeton, ____; Easthampton, James Smith; Montague City, Fred Bridges; Northampton, A.J. Frank; Southampton, L,L, Walcott; Amherst, E.B. Fitts; Emmett of Turners Falls, Donahue; Westfield, ____.

This portion of the treat was very creditable to the bands of the association, and went far to make amends for any shortcomings of the opening concert. The pieces played by the Fitchburg, Haydenville, Florence, Orange, Greenfield, Bernardston, South Deerfield and perhaps one or two others, were exceedingly fine and enlisted hearty applause from the spectators. The Gardner serenade, which numbered only 6 pieces, attracted a good deal of attention by its excellent playing, and there was not a failure or a poor performance by any.

These selected pieces by the different bands made up a varied programme which continued through the afternoon. The audience filled every available seat in the great amphitheater, and many took a better cushioned place of rest upon the ground, while a vast throng surged about, tramping up hill and down, filling the paths of the grove, or the walks upon the shore of the lake. A number of boats and barges were constantly filled and moving over the Lake, and everybody was disposed to make the most of the day and be happy.

We should not have said everybody, because there were hundreds who got hot and disgusted before they had been on the ground half an hour, and seated themselves in the cars left on the side track, and there waited hour after hour for the time of their departure, fretting and stewing and wishing they had staid [sic] at home; but who will be just as ready to be on hand another year. Hayner’s full orchestra furnished music for the dancers in the pavilion; the day wore away, as such occasions do, and people crowded down upon the track and hustled and jostled to get aboard the cars as the different trains were made up.

The throng, for such a large one, was very orderly. There were a few cases of drunkenness, and one man had his horse stolen, but the police officers found little occasion for their service. The bands will realize a very handsome thing from their share of the day’s profits, and we trust will keep up their organization, giving us a Centennial Festival of this kind next year. Much credit is due Vice President Day and Secretary Squier of Greenfield for the day’s success.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Bernardston (MA), Clubs, Crime, Dance, Deerfield (MA), Drunkenness, Economics, Fairs, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Heritage Activities, Horses, Lake Pleasant (MA), Massachusetts, Millers Falls (MA), Montague (MA), Music, Names, Orange (MA), Police, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Robbers and Outlaws

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Died

Tyler, Charlaine P., age 63, wife of George W. Tyler, died very suddenly in Bernardston. Funeral Mon. at 2 o'clock.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Mourning Customs, Obituaries

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Bernardston

Among other rare articles to be found at Allen & Lyman's is a very superior writing fluid. We commend this fluid to all knights of the quill, and to scribes of all kinds. Try it.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Bernardston (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Stores, Retail

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 14, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Franklin County tax payers

Greenfield - no. of polls, 927; in 1874, 929; valuation of personal property, 1875, $853,973; in 1874, $828,853; valuation of real estate, 1875, $1,969,665; in 1874, $1,954,790; total valuation, 1875, $2,823,638; in 1874, $2,783,653; rate, 1875, $14.50 per thousand; 1874, $13.50 per thousand.

The following is a list of persons who pay a tax of $25 and upwards, not including fire district tax, which will be about $3 on $1000.

Abell, George A., $41.15
Austin, Thomas N., $33.90
Adams, George C., $87.70
Adams, Peleg, $360.50
Adams, John A., $85.52
Amidon, J.H., $26.65
Avery estate, $30.45
Allen, William H., $89
Allen, F.R., $89
Allen, S’s Sons, $304.50
Allen, George A., $44.05
Allen, Quintas, $83.20
Allen, John S. & Son, $44.82
Arms, George A., $413.80
Arms, Elihu G., $46.95
Aiken, David, $65.80
Ames, James M., $129.75
Ames, James M., trustee, $87
Ames, George, $33.90
Alexander, A.A., $38.83

Bryant, Chauncey, $29.53
Black, Nathaniel, $25.64
Breck, S.P. & son, $71.60
Browning, Anson, $46.95
Briggs, Samuel, $38.98
Breen, John, $36.80
Blake, E.B., $31
Bryant & Miner, $43.50
Brackett, H.W., $31.36
Brown, Harriet, estate, no amount listed
Bouker, Henry, $35.35
Beals, Joseph, $68.70
Bascom, Abner N., $46.59
Bascom, Chester A., $52.67
Billings, Henry F., $60.20
Bullard, A.C., $71
Bullard, Willard, $62.51
Bullard, Silas, $88.28
Barney, Edward, $109
Briggs, Henry D., $33.10
Barton, Lyman G., $183.44
Ballou, Perley & sons, $123.81
Bass, O.H., $39 (I’m rounding off the cents from hereon in)
Burnham, F.L., $28
Bird, Julia, $145
Benton, Edward, $93
Butler, Calvin L., $52
Bangs, J.C., $44

Colle, Mary, $58
Coombs, Mrs. Walter, $114
Carll, J.L., $38
Chapin, Caleb, $45
Chapin, John, $34
Chapin, Julius E., $58
Chapin, David G., $45
Cushman, Mrs. H.W., $50
Chapman, Matthew, $171
Chapman, Frank R., $74
Cohn, Charles, $31
Comstock, W.O., $67
Conant, C.C., $60
Clark, A.S., $40
Childs, M.M., $68
Carpenter, Ira, $61
Coller, D.F., $48
Cook, R.W., $82
Clapp, Mrs. Anna C., $37
Clapp, Frederick, $62
Clapp, H.W. estate, $307
Conn. RR Co., $261
Cong’l. Society, 2nd, $47
Cleveland, Edward, $31

Deane, Alice & sister, $87
Deane, Dr. A.C., $102
Deane, & Wright, $29
Deane, Daniel L., $35
Day, William J., $36
Dodge, Charles F., $45
Davis, W.T., $132
Davis, Henry J., $43
Draper, W.W., $35
Daniels, W.C., $31
Doolittle, George, $729
Dunkley, Edward, $28
DeWolf, Austin, $96
Dwyer, John, $25

Eddy, George S., $80
Embury, H.C., $28
Eagan, Jerry, $33
Elliot, William, $48
Eastman, S.S., $105
Eastman, S.S. & Co., $131
Episcopal Society, $65

Farrell, Lewis, $36
Fisk, Dr. Charles L., $53
Fitzgerald, P.M., $60
Fitzgerald, John, $70
Field, F.E., $31
Farnsworth & Persons, $30
Field, Albert A., $29
Field, Charles R., $183
Field, & Hall, $29
Forbes, William A., $119
Fuller, Mrs. H.M., $36
Frary, George W. $115
Forbes & Foster, $6
Fellows, M.S., $78
Felton, J.P., $99
Field, Mrs. A.R., $75
First National Bank, $174 (had Nirst)
Franklin County National Bank, $362

Grennell, George, $212 (also seen as Grinnell)
Graves, John J., $45
Graves, Luther L., $35
Graves, Mrs. J.M., $31
Graves, Alonzo, $89
Gascouigne, J.F., $49
Griswold, W., estate, $40
Griswold, Duloie, g’d’n, $108
Griswold J.F., $83
Gunn, Levi J., $66
Greenfield Tool Co., $420

Henry, Benjamin, $45
Henry, Nathan F., $130
Henry, Charles, $35
Henry, & Smead, $38
Hagar, F.S., $67
Haskell, C.C., $28
Hunter, David, $45
Harris, H.C., $31
Haywood, L.M., $31
Hosmer, F.J., guardian, $62
Haywood, Mrs. G.P., $78
Horr, John, $42
Holcomb, Alfred, $29
Hall, E.A., $32
Hall, S.W., $75
Howland, Rufus, $183
Hall, T.V., $30
Hollister, J.H., $375
Hovey, Dr. Daniel, estate, $224
Hovey, George H., $425
HItchcock, A.C., $31
Hawks, Frederick, $57
Handforth, Henry, $50
Hull, A.N., $41

Jackson, Andrew, $31
Jackson, Mrs. O.M., $56
Joslyn & Kimball, $101
Jones, O.M., $30
Jones, Ed J., $144
Jones, Dennis W., $64

Kennedy, John, $33
Kelliher, Dennis, $36
Kellogg, Bela, $56
Kellogg, Bela & Co., $48
Keith, Charles, $88
Keuran, H.E., $73
Keith, William, $141
Kelley, F.B. & F.S., $85

Lamb, J.H., $48
Lamb, Samuel O., $93
Lamb, Samuel O., agent, $29
Lamb, Samuel O., Ex’r., J. Miles estate, $92
Lamb, Samuel O., Ex’r., F.B. Russell, $203
Lamb, Samuel O., Treasurer, Greenfield Gas Co., $174
Lawrence, Royal, $31
Loomis, Rev. A.G., $64
Leonard, Mrs. Theo, $91
Lyons, J.L., $210
Lyons, David, $26
Lyons, Samuel J., $33
Lyons, Charles D., $26
Long, Lemuel H., $60
Leavitt, Miss Mary, $65
Lowell, Charles R., $60
Leighton, C.W., $54
Leonard, Horatio, $29
Lander, Ben D., $29
Lyman, E.E., $44
Larrabee, Eber X., $91

Moody, Mrs. Fannie, $36
Miller, J.W., $60
Miller, H.L., $64
McClure, Manly, $68
Murdock, Charles A., $26
Merriam, E.D., $74
McFarland, John, $67
Miner, A.G., $48
Moore, Mrs. Oramel, estate, $43
Moore & Withey, $73
Moore, J.W. & Son, $101
McClellan, C.H., $118
Maxwell, S.S., $76
Methodist Society, $58
Maynard, Gilbert, $35
Moors, John F., $73
Munn, Charles H., $52
Martin, Frank E., $53
Munson, J.M., $252
Martindale, P.D., $122
Megrath, A.W., $52

Nash, Lyman & Son, $114
Noyes, B.B., $29
Noyes, B.B. & Co., $100
Nichols, John, $32
Newhall, Albert, $29
Newhall, Mrs. Mary, $58
Newton, James, $285
Newton, Joseph D., $133
Newton, John S., $113
Newton, H.C. & son, $97
Newton, Seth, $64
Nims, Lucius & Son, $224
Nims, Charles T., $95
Nims, William M., $82
Nash, E.Q., $142

Owen, Euclid, $129
Osgood, J.W.D., $163
Osbon, E.H., $29
Osterhout, John, $55
Osgood, E. and son, $53

Parker, Alonzo, $118
Parker, B.S., $54
Phillips, Simeon, $33
Phelps, John C., $31
Phillips, Rufus, $64
Phillips, N.P. & Son, $52
Potter & Stearns, $27
Potter, George W., $130
Potter & Nash, $161
Potter, William, $133
Potter, Warren J., $100
Pierce, George, $32
Pierce, George Jr., $38
Pierce & Austin, $68
Pierce & Co., $54
Pierce, J.J. & Sons, $233
Pierce, J.J. & Others, $87
Pratt, F.J., $93
Pratt, Stephen L., $41
Payne, H.B. & S.W., $95
Prichard, R.S., $28
Porter, James, $57
Porter, Pliny, $27
Parmenter, E.A., $116
Prentiss, H.H., $29
Phelps, Ansel estate, $389
Packard, R.A., $89
Pine, William, $42
Pond, Mary, $410
Pond, Frank A., $63
Pierce, M.R. & N.G., $44
Pierce, M.R., $33
Pierce, N.G., $29
Pickett, Job G., $48
Potter, E. Turner, $77

Richardson, J.J., $129
Richardson, J.B., $45
Richmond, Charles, $39
Reed, Charles N., $39
Root, Spencer B., $229
Root, W.F., $91
Root, T.D. estate, $63
Russell, J., estate, $488
Russell, Nathaniel E., $413
Rice, Mrs. L.W., $29
Robinson, James, $31
Reed, Kate & H., $36
Rowley, Joseph Jr., $28
Ripley, Thomas H., $31
Riley, Samuel, $36
Riddell, J.W., $218
Root, Cephas estate, $34
Russell, John, $57

Simons, D.S., $438
Sheldon, Henry, $28
Sheldon, John, $38
Spear, Daniel W., $112
Sauter, Gotleib, $70
Sprague, Peter T., $31
Smead, William M., $74
Smead, William, $50
Smead, Charles L., $94
Smead, S.A., estate, $105
Sawtell, Lyman, $25
Shaw, D.G., $42
Spring, J.C., $45
Stratton, E.A., $35
Stratton, C.M., $60
Strecker, Edward, $168
Sparhawk, Mrs. L.B., $36
Stone, L.H., $45
Stearns, John H., $33
Stones, Mrs. H. & A., $37
Stevens, Mrs. H., $65
Stimpson, W.A., $28
Seward & Willard, $116
Sammis, D.L., $120
Severance, Dr. W.S., $69
Severance, P.P., $144
Sessler, Jacob, $34
Stickney, William, $78
Sanderson, J.S., $123
Snow, Barnabas, $54
Snow, Newell, $67
Snow & Felton, $58
Slate, S.B., $69
Sawyer, Benjamin, $28
Smith, L.T., $44
Smith, Elijah W., $69
Smith, F.G., $72
Smith, Preserved, $52
Shattuck, S.L., $121
Shattuck & Co., $108
Smead, C.W., $72
Salisbury, George E., $54

Thompson, J.W., $26
Thompson, F.M., $41
Tyler, C.H., $28
Tyler, Major H., $46
Tyler, H.H., $52
Traver, Phillip, $60
Thayer, A.T. estate, $34

Washburn, W.B., $509
Woods, Hopkins, $53
Wells, Frank, $35
Wells, Edward, $25
Woodard, Mrs. E.G., $47
Woodard, H.G., $133
Wilson, Joel, $212
Wilby, George, $26
Williams, G.D., $41
Williams, G.D., trustee, $104
Wade, T.S., $74
Wade & Corbett, $36
Wiley, Robert, $103
Wiley, Solon L., $103
Wiley, Oren, $95
Womersley, Dr. T., $41
Wait, Thomas, $104
Wait, Lyman J., $31
Wise, Willard A., $27
Walker, Dr. A.C., $78
Wells, N.S., $52
Wells, C.B., $42
Wise, William M., $102
Wright, A.H., $125
Wiliams, Misses, $36
Ward, Mrs. E.V., $87
Ward, Mrs. E.V., guardian, $58
Wheeler, S.S., $54
Wunsch, William, $96
Wood, Seth, $39
Warner, A.K., $52
Warner Mfg. Co., $73
Zeiner, John L., $28

Non-residents

Adams, Amos, Montague, $116
Botsford, Mrs. Lizzie A., Boston, $145
Bardwell, O.O., Shelburne, $26
Conant, Mrs. S.T., Newark, N.J., $40
Couillard, Henry, Shelburne, $43
Coleman, Matthew, Springfield, $40
Dickinson, Caleb, estate, Hatfield, $33
Fisk, D.O., Shelburne, $60
Goss, R.L., Montague, $79
Hopkins, W.S.B., Worcester, $58
Hale, Israel P., Bernardston, $31
Long, Alanson, Boston, $51
Merriam, Charles, Springfield, $72
Pierce, Samuel R., Turners Falls, $53
Schwartz, Louis B., Boston, $166
Sage, O.W., Cazenovia, N.Y., $28
Sanborn, W.H., New Haven, $268
Smith Charities, Northampton, $1700
Slate, Charles, Shelburne, $34
Sanderson, John, Bernardston, $72
Thompson, Charles, Conn., $31
Temple, Philo, Deerfield, $27
Todd, Cynthia, Leyden, $27
Turners Falls Company, $290
Wells, D. & H., Shelburne, $53
Williams, Bishop, Boston, $29.
 

Subjects: Bernardston (MA), Boston (MA), Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Charity, Connecticut, Connecticut River, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Family, Fires, Government, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Massachusetts, Medical Personnel, Montague (MA), Names, Natural Resources, Orphans and Orphanages, Religion, Rich People, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Stores, Retail, Sunderland (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 13, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

William L. Day, who may justly be considered the veteran musician of this county, was given a complementary surprise last Wed. aft., of which he may well feel proud. The occasion was his 50th birthday. The bands of Greenfield, South Deerfield, Bernardston and Montague City, numbering in all some 70 musicians, nearly all of whom had been under his instruction, rendezvoused at the Greenfield Band Room about half past 4, and consolidating into one organization under the leadership of Samuel Squier, marched up Federal Street.

Mr. Day lives some distance out of the village. His wife, who had been entrusted with the secret, kept him at home, and the first intimation he had of the demonstration, the musical battalion came marching up the road, filling the air with their martial strains. Several of the musicians had their ladies in attendance, bringing abundant refreshments, and the occasion was made as jolly as possible. As a testimonial of esteem, Drum Major Lyman of the South Deerfield Band, presented in behalf of his comrades a large easy chair, and a smaller one for Mrs. Day.

The little speech was neatly delivered and Mr. Day made a brief but feeling response. Two or three hours were spent, mainly in playing in concert under the direction of Mr. Day, and then with good wishes the party broke up.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Bernardston (MA), Births, Deerfield (MA), Education, Food, Furniture, Greenfield (MA), Households, Montague (MA), Music, Parties, Roads, Women, Words

Posted by stew - Wed, Dec 10, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Bernardston

Week before last was one of picnics, emphatically so, at Sylvan Grove in this town. On Mon. the 5th, the Hibernians from Keene N.H. celebrated the nation’s birthday by a picnic, which was numerously attended, there being several car loads of men, women and children. They brought their favorite beer in great abundance, and their own police to preserve order and guard the festivities of the occasion from all interruption that might ensue from the "working" of the beer. The police were mostly of the Yankee blood, large and powerful looking men.

They brought along with them two fine bands of music, a brass band, and a string band, to stir the soul with harmony. National pride was quite apparent on this occasion, several of the leading ones wearing the green plume and other trappings of Irish nationality. Upon one large and beautiful banner, we saw the name of Emmett, a name dear to every Irish heart, and a name worthy to be revered by every patriot. Upon the whole this picnic appeared to be a very enjoyable affair, and well enjoyed by all concerned, giving no unfavorable impressions of the Irish character.

There were some very sprightly and amusing single jig dancing, both by males and females, which was almost "super" Yankee. [?] There was only one beer fight, and this was soon checked by the long, bony arms of a Yankee policeman. One of those combatants did not belong to the party from Keene. As soon as clear from the grasp of the policeman, he made tracks as fast as his ten toes could carry him, for fear of being handcuffed and tied to a tree, a summary, but very proper and effective way of treating the license loving public when inclined to pugilistic sentiments.

At a seasonable hour the party all left for their homes in sober good nature, all feeling they had had a good time, and honored the birth of their adopted country. The next picnic in order was that of the two Baptist Societies from Springfield, called the Sunday School Picnic, and was the largest gathering of the kind held at Sylvan Grove this season, there being 9 car loads of old and young, and was evidently a gathering of [?] first social rank of the place. They also had two bands of music, a brass band and a string band, and in addition they had a choir of male singers, whose vocal powers can hardly be beat if equaled.

We cannot recall the time when we have been so highly pleased with social music. And we were not a little surprised, but very "agreeably" so, to learn that the Baptist people can "trip it on the light fantastic toe", and call the same an innocent and sinless amusement, as well as other professing Christians. Truly old prejudices are giving way and common sense is gaining ground...

Thurs. July 8, a colored picnic from Springfield occupied Sylvan Grove, numbering 201 grown up persons of both sexes, and 31 children. They called themselves the Pilgrim Baptists, and during their stay here their conduct was very exemplary and seemed perfectly consistent with the Christian name and character. Their sense of Christian propriety forbade them to indulge in dancing exercises, which seems almost an instinct of the African race, consequently they had no music but vocal, some of which was exceedingly charming to the ear. They were scrupulously neat in appearance, well dressed, though not fantastically so, which is considered by many to be an African characteristic.

They were all shades, from a jet black to a light quadroon, many of them having the straight auburn hair and the Saxon blue eye. Many of them gave evidence of a good degree of general intelligence and learning, being able to converse with ease upon various topics, especially religious topics, to which they seemed much inclined. Their demeanor, through the day, was such as to claim the respect of every one present; and we were very willing to admit that they rightfully belonged to the great Christian brotherhood of man.

Several of the first class citizens of the place showed them marks of politeness and courtesy, by carrying them about town in their carriages. "A blessing on him who cheers the downtrodden".

Fri. July 9, the Unitarian Society from Northampton held a picnic at Sylvan Grove. This party numbered 150, a number highly respectable for the Society, which we understand is quite small. It was quite evident from appearances that this party was composed of people of both sexes from the first circles of refined society in points of politeness and moral culture. They were accompanied by a band of music of 6 pieces, called the Arlan Orchestra, T.S. Billings, leader, a gentleman highly distinguished for musical talents, as also were the others of the band. The music of this band probably cannot be beat by any band in Western Massachusetts. Mr. Billings is, no doubt, an amateur of music from birth.

Of course a dance followed the sweet strains of this music; indeed, they couldn’t help it, so bewitching is the power of music over the head and heels. Among the dancers first up on this occasion we saw an old gentleman, 83 years old; and had you seen nothing of him but the nimble and elastic step of his feet, you certainly would have said those feet were not more than 20 years old; a remarkable instance of green old age. This was no less a man than David Damon, a well known citizen in the first circles of Northampton society. [See the Google book "Early Northampton", 1914],

(Pardon us for calling names). Nothing happened in word or deed to mar the enjoyment of this pleasant occasion. There was no smell of ’license" stronger than good tea and coffee, with plenty of cool lemonade. Joy and social kindness shone in every countenance, showing the unspeakable advantages of refined society. Even the gentle bearing and graceful manners of the little children lent a charm to the occasion. Such a picnic we would gladly see repeated. Scribe.
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Amusements, Barber / Hair, Bernardston (MA), Beverages, Children, Dance, Drunkenness, Education, Etiquette, Eye, Family, Fashion, Food, Government, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Heritage Activities, Holidays, Horses, Irish, Law and Lawyers, Liquors, Massachusetts, Music, Names


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