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Sep 19, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

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Article Archives: Articles: Clubs

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - The Live Oaks baseball club were beaten by the Resolutes of Shattuckville, on the grounds of the latter Sat.,by a score of 17 to 4.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Contests, Montague (MA), Names, Sports, Trees, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The ladies of the Baptist Society will give us an oyster and pound party at the vestry on Wed. eve. Many novel and interesting entertainments will be introduced. All members of the Society will each carry a pound of something which will be sold at auction. Let everybody attend.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Religion, Sales, Vendors and Purchasers, Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Caledonians at Lake Pleasant



There was not the anticipated crowd at the Tournament of the Springfield Caledonian Society at Lake Pleasant on Wed. Special trains were run up from the South and from the east on the Fitchburg road, but many of the cars were nearly empty. The lake has had its attractions for the season, and people are now holding on to the spare coppers for the needs of approaching winter.

But few of the Caledonians were in full costume, yet the advertised programme was carried out, and the day’s sports were by no means a fizzle. The Fitchburg Band and Russell’s orchestra furnished the music, and the following were the successful winners in the principle athletic feats:

In the three-legged race, in which the competitors race in pairs with a leg of each tied to that of his comrade, Richard Harvey of Easthampton and Paul Fitzgerald of Shelburne Falls took the first prize of $6, and Hutchins and Wilson took the second of $3.

In the Hop, Skip and Jump contest, Thomas O’Donald of Northampton proved the best man, clearing 38 feet, and took the first prize of $5; and P. Sullivan of Ftichburg, who cleared 37 1/2 ft. took the 2nd prize of $2."Putting heavy stone" was a trial of strength of throwing a 16 lb. iron ball; John Purcell of Florence threw it 41 1/2 ft.and won the 1st prize of $6; Patrick Purcell of Florence, who threw it 31 ft. 4 inches, had the 2nd prize of $3.



Dancing the Highland Fling in costume was an interesting feature,George Bothwick of Boston taking the 1st prize of $6, and W.G.Smith of Boston the 2nd of $3. Tossing the caber ( a 12 ft. stick of lumber) was won by John Purcell who threw it 30 ft. 1 inch, receiving $5, and E.R. McCormick of Florence came next, and received $3.



In vaulting with a pole, Richard Harvey cleared a perpendicular jump of 8 ft. 7 inches and took the 1st prize of $5, and P. Purcell took the 2nd of $3. In the mile foot race, P. Sullivan of Fitchburg made the best time and took the 1st prize of $10, and E. Wilson was 2nd, and took the prize of $5.

There was a hurdle race, which was quite an exciting affair; R. Harvey took the 1st money, $6, and __ Hitchcock, the 2nd, $3. There were 4 contestants in the swimming match. The course was from the gent’s bath house to the landing. F.M.Sweeney of Worcester took the 1st prize of $15, and G.H. Crocker of Fitchburg the 2nd, of $10.



The single scull race was the great event of the day. There were 4 entries, and the course was the length of the lake and back. It was a close and exciting contest. John E. Brown of Worcester won the race and the 1st money, $40; Daniel McSweeney of Fitchburg came in 2nd, for $30; Jerry Callahan of Springfield came in 3rd and received $15.

Some boys caused no little sport in the tub race, where they were frequently capsized. The games were continued until the departure of the trains at night.


 

Subjects: Accidents, Amusements, Boston (MA), Children, Clubs, Contests, Dance, Economics, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Heritage Activities, Lake Pleasant (MA), Massachusetts, Montague (MA), Music, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Sports, Trains, Transportation, Trees, Weather, Clothing

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Bloody Brook Bi-Centennial

A memorable celebration - The 200th anniversary of the massacre of Captain Thomas Lathrop and the "Flower of Essex"

http://www.memorialh.../lesson5/bloody.html

by the Indians of Bloody Brook, occurred on Sat. the 18th, and was celebrated by services of commemoration at S. Deerfield on Fri. the 17th. Held in connection with the celebration was the Sixth Annual Field meeting of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association...We doubt if ever South Deerfield witnessed such an influx of strangers as thronged to her beautiful streets on this pleasant morning. From a radius of many miles they came...

(For a complete account of the event, please see p. 283+ of Google Books 'History and proceedings of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association'].

[The account itself takes up 4 long columns in the paper, so please take advantage of the Google Books account!]
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Food, Heritage Activities, History, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Native Americans, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

William Knapp, aged 90, died at Newburyport on Sun. He was one of the first abolitionists and the brother of Isaac Knapp, the original partner of Garrison in the Liberator. He was one of the oldest Freemasons in the State, and was Master of a Lodge 60 years ago.

[See the Internet Archive's full text of "History of Newburyport, Mass., 1764-1905].
 

Subjects: African-Americans / Blacks, Clubs, Family, Freemasonry, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Obituaries, Old Age

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The Turnverein Hall is fast approaching completion.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Germans, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The 46th anniversary of the Franklin County Baptist Association was held on Wed. and Thurs. of last week. This association is not as large as its name would indicate - only about half of the Baptist churches of the county are in this body. The other churches of the county are connected with the Millers River Association, whose anniversary is to be held in Turners Falls this week.

This division of the Baptist churches of this county into two associations is found to work rather against the interests of the churches. Steps have been taken to unite these two bodies...As it is the Franklin Association is composed of only 11 churches, and of these only 7 churches support a settled ministry...

A feature of special interest was the presence of the venerable and beautiful old man, Father David Pease of Ashfield, now in his 93rd year. Although blind and quite lame, his mind is as clear, and his heart as warm as ever. His life has almost covered the century of our nation's history. The old man was quite elegant in describing the struggles of the Baptist denomination under the old tyranny of the standing order...
 

Subjects: Ashfield (MA), Clubs, Eye, Handicapped, History, Montague (MA), Names, Old Age, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
South Deerfield

South Deerfield - The Deerfield guards have invited the six river companies of the 2nd Regiment to be their guests at the coming centennial.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Heritage Activities, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
South Deerfield

South Deerfield - The Grand Army boys recently went into the tobacco field of George W. Bardwell and harvested the same.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Smoking and Tobacco, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 21, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - About 2 months since, some of the young men of each denomination here came together to organize an association, encouraged by Rev. Mr. Groth, Rev. Mr. Howes and Rev. Mr. Seaver. Till the present month they have held their meetings in the chapels of the churches and at Wood's Hall, Riverside. For the present month they have pitched a large tent on the Avenue on 4th Street, in which meetings are to be held whenever circumstances will permit. Last eve., Wed. was the first.

The meeting was largely attended, the tent being filled and the number outside being a hundred or more....the addresses being interspersed with singing and praying. Considering the large no. present, and the fact that we are a manufacturing people, the order was better than should be expected, without the assistance of others to enforce order, and the result of the meeting was gratifying to the friends of the association...
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Clubs, Connecticut River, Gill (MA), Montague (MA), Music, Police, Religion, Roads, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
The Bloody Brook celebration

The Bloody Brook celebration - Though crippled and discouraged by the disastrous fire, the people of South Deerfield do not propose to "back out" of the Bicentennial Celebration of the Massacre of Bloody Brook which had been arranged for next Fri. With the aid and the cooperation of the residents of Old Deerfield and neighboring towns, they propose to carry out the programme, giving the thousands who may come to participate in the honors and pleasures of the day a cordial and generous welcome.

The services of commemoration are held in connection with the sixth annual field meeting of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association. The President of the day is Hon. George T. Davis of Portland, Me., with Hon. George Grennell, Hon. James S. Whitney, Col. David Wells, Rev. C.S. Brooks, James C. Arms, Henry Childs, George W. Jones, Hon. W.B. Washburn, Rev. F.A. Warfield, Rev. J.F. Moors, Col. Austin Rice for Vice Presidents.

A grand procession will be formed at the depot on the arrival of the train from the north at 10 1/2 a.m., Col. J.B. Parsons of Northampton acting as Chief Marshal. Participating in the parade will be 7 companies of Col. Parson's command, the 2nd Regiment, the South Deerfield Band, members of the Grand Army and Veterans of the late war, the officers, speakers and poets of the day, Patrons of Husbandry, aged citizens, invited guests and other civic bodies and citizens generally.

The order of exercises will be as follows: Dirge by the South Deerfield Band; opening address by George Sheldon, Chairman of the Committee; an original ode by E.W.B. Canning, sung by the Quartette Club; prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. C.S. Brooks; music by the Band; oration by Hon. George B. Loring of Salem; collation; music; poem by William Everett of Cambridge; ode by Miss Eliza A. Starr, sung by the Quartette Club; and then will follow short addresses, music, etc.

The collation will be served in the same way as at the Whatelly Centennial - paper napkins being distributed and the provisions then passed around. The Deerfield Guards had invited several companies of their regiment, intending to provide for their entertainment, but as the fire destroyed some $500 or $600 worth of property belonging to the Guards, they are almost in a bankrupt condition, and the citizens of the town have now come forward and guarantee to furnish the military with a collation.

The people who attend are supposed to carry their lunch baskets and are requested to furnish what they can for our guests of the town who come unprovided. As the hotels of the place have been destroyed, all strangers will be dependent upon the citizens for entertainment. Passengers over the Connecticut River Railroad will be transported for half fare. and the same courtesy will be extended from North Adams and stations west of Greenfield on the Vt. & Mass. road.

All Grangers who attend the Bi-centennial are requested to report at the house of Norman B. Clark, a little south of the monument near the grave of Lathrop, where a committee of the order will be in readiness to receive and wait upon them. The people of Deerfield will be called upon to contribute provisions for the occasion by solicitors in each neighborhood, and they should be prepared to contribute biscuit, cold meats and plain cake.

The Pocumtuck Lodge of Odd Fellows of Greenfield have voted to attend the gathering and parcipate in the parade. The committee of arrangements though not issuing special invitations, desire the attendance of all organizations, including the Grand Army and other secret societies.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Cemeteries, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Fires, Food, Greenfield (MA), Heritage Activities, Holidays, Hotels, Massachusetts, Meat, Mourning Customs, Music, Native Americans, Old Age, Poetry, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Statues, Trains, Transportation, War / Weaponry, Whately (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 16, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items



Greenfield - The Fenian brotherhood are going to have a moonlight dance in Pierce's Grove next Wed. eve.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Astronomy, Clubs, Dance, Irish, Parks

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 14, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emCIxAJCe2g&NR=1

Greenfield - The tournament of the Springfield Caledonian Society will be the great attraction at Lake Pleasant this week. It comes off on Wed., and excursion trains are to be run over the various roads. $250 are to be distributed in prizes. There are to be foot races, hurdle races and other athletic sports, and a single scull race, in which Harrington, the Springfield champion, and Brown, the champion of Worcester will participate. It will be the first boat race on the Lake. The Scottish societies will be in costume, and the "Highland fling" will be one of the features of the occasion.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Contests, Dance, Economics, Greenfield (MA), Lake Pleasant (MA), Massachusetts, Montague (MA), Sports, Trains, Transportation, Scots and Scotland

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 6, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

(Greenfield) The Sovereigns of Industry have ordered and received about 200 tons of coal
 

Subjects: Clubs, Coal, Greenfield (MA)

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 4, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Shelburne Falls

(Shelburne Falls) The new Turnverein hall has been raised and is fast being covered.
 

Subjects: Clubs, Germans, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Deerfield

We find the following in the New Haven Daily Union. As Mr. Hutchins is a Deerfield boy, it will be of interest to his friends in this locality:

"Professor Frank Hutchins, well known personal friend and fellow townsman, will make his debut with a cornet solo (Whirlwind Polka) at Loomis's Temple of Music http://www.rootsweb....io/Leichter_Max.html New Haven, Fri. eve. Aug. 27, in the grand social entertainment given under the Free Lecture Association. Mr. Hutchins is a member and first cornet performer for the Wallingford Band, a superior and talented musician, with a power of execution upon his favorite instrument seldom witnessed. The New Haven people musically interested have a rare treat in prospect on the coming occasion".
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Connecticut, Deerfield (MA), Emigration and Immigration, Literature / Web Pages, Music, Show Business, Words

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Athol

Dr. John H. Williams, one of Athol's prominent citizens, died suddenly Sun. from paralysis of the brain. He arose, but not feeling well, retired again, and on being called to breakfast, complained of dizziness, but came downstairs and lay on a sofa. He kept growing worse and medical aid was summoned, but death finally relieved him in the late aft.

Dr. Williams has long been a resident of Athol, and in his business and other affairs has established an enviable reputation for honesty and integrity...Of late he has been much depressed, and probably the losses which he has endured and the anxiety attending them were the final cause of his death. The funeral was fully attended Wed., both by the Masons of the Star and Athol lodges and the people generally.
 

Subjects: Athol (MA), Businesspeople, Clubs, Diseases, Dreams / Sleep, Economics, Food, Freemasonry, Furniture, Medical Personnel, Mourning Customs, Obituaries

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Athol

The union camp fire and picnic of the Grand Army posts of Athol and Orange, near the town line, is announced for September 8. The Athol and Orange cornet bands will attend, and the former will appear in their new uniforms for the first time. Base ball [i.e. baseball] and a clam chowder will be among the features.

http://dovercanyon.t...05369a0277970c-800wi
 

Subjects: Amusements, Athol (MA), Clubs, Fires, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Music, Orange (MA), Sports, War / Weaponry, Clothing

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
Lake Pleasant



The Springfield Caledonian Club propose to hold a picnic at Lake Pleasant Sept. 15. The sports of the day - games, dancing, etc. - will be a novelty in this section. A boat race is also on the programme.

[Caledonian Clubs are composed of those of Scottish descent, and all others interested in Scotland].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Contests, Dance, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Lake Pleasant (MA), Montague (MA), Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Sports, Scots and Scotland

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 3, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
D.L. Moody

The Franklin County Association of Congregational ministers has for some time entertained the project of holding a kind of picnic reception at Lake Pleasant in honor of Mr. Moody's return to America after his triumphant career in Europe. Correspondence in reference to the matter was commenced before Mr. Moody came home. He now positively declines to participate in any such demonstration to the regret of our local clergy.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Food, Lake Pleasant (MA), Literature / Web Pages, Montague (MA), Religion, Europe

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 18, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 30, 1875
News about home: Greenfield items

The amusement committee of the Agricultural Society have about decided to have the balloon ascension on the last day of the Fair, provided that Greenfield merchants, and others who will be benefited by the influx of people attracted by the sight, will "chip in" to help pay the expense.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Astronomy, Clubs, Economics, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Greenfield (MA), Vendors and Purchasers, Words

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Coleraine

Situated up among the hills, yet we have some beautiful valleys as well as the lovely mountain scenery - we are a busy people - few if any loungers or unemployed, all have something to do, notwithstanding the cry of hard times so often heard. There are 3 cotton mills, many more lumber mills, 2 butter box manufactories, most kinds of mechanic shops, all of which are doing a good business.

Some very fine carriages are made here; there are several stores, 5 churches, two Methodist Episcopal, one Congregational, 2 Baptist. Five secret societies, viz. Grand Army Post, Sons of Temperance, two Sovereigns of Industry and a Grange; that we have a good hotel we hardly need assert as those who pass this way know, as well as others who read the papers.

We have many good farms well cultivated and from appearances are about to yield satisfactory harvests; the late rains have done much to improve crops. The farmers are getting wiser and are raising less tobacco than in former years, other crops receiving more attention such as grass, corn, oats, etc. and are looking well.

We know of no place in town where intoxicating liquors are sold, and one drunk is rarely seen. We have no railroad but there is considerable talk of one. Our schools, some 15 in number, are good, comparing favorably with those around us, and our mail facilities and modes of conveyance to and from are equal to larger towns, and places on railroads with the exception of the iron horse.

A good number from more crowded towns stopping here during the warm weather, yet there is room for others.
 

Subjects: Bars (Drinking establishments), Business Enterprises, Clubs, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Horses, Hotels, Liquors, Literature / Web Pages, Religion, Smoking and Tobacco, Stores, Retail, Temperance, Trains, Transportation, Vacations, War / Weaponry, Weather, Work, Grange, National

Posted by stew - Wed, Jan 7, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Court record

The annual Aug. term of the Superior court was begun Thurs., Judge P. Emory Aldrich or Worcester presiding. The court was opened by prayer by Rev. Dr. Samuel Hollingsworth, at 10 o'clock a.m. The Grand Jury were called and sent out to attend to their duties, and the trial list called off as usual. Before the opening of the court, a meeting of the Franklin County Bar was held, and suitable action taken for meeting with the Hampshire Bar in being represented at the funeral of Ithamar F. Conkey, Esq., of Amherst, which took place Wed. Mr. Conkey was well and favorably known in this vicinity, and holding the office of U.S. Register in Bankruptcy, was very frequently at Greenfield to hold court in bankruptcy proceedings.

The following traverse jurors were duly empaneled for the term...The following bills of indictment were reported by the Grand Jury: Against Marshall D. Porter, Henry Moore and Henry Smith of Deerfield, for larceny; Patrick Frain of Charlemont, two bills, one for arson, and one for larceny from building; M.H. Porter. for receiving stolen goods; William Taylor of Deerfield, for larceny from person; Frank P. Bell of Coleraine for assault; Timothy Sullivan of Greenfield for larceny.

The following cases were then put on trial: Simon L. Shattuck et al vs. George W. Jones - This was an account of contract, on an account annexed, which ran back to 1872...The jury, after being out 5 hours, returned a verdict for the plaintiff, amount, $212.50.
 

Subjects: Charlemont (MA), Clubs, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Deerfield (MA), Economics, Fires, Greenfield (MA), Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Law and Lawyers, Massachusetts, Mourning Customs, Obituaries, Religion, Robbers and Outlaws

Posted by stew - Tue, Jan 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Hawley

At the examination of the school in the sixth district, a paper was read, the articles of which were furnished by the scholars. The following is a specimen: Southampton Sewing Society -

Several spinsters sat sewing, sighing silently. Solomon Snooks strolled slowly, surveying Susanna Simpson's sewing, simpering slyly, sighing "Sweet Susanna". soon Solomon spoke, saying "Susanna, sun shines". Smilingly Susanna said "serenely sweet". Solomon sighed softly. Somehow speech seemed scarce"...
 

Subjects: Astronomy, Children, Clubs, Courtship, Education, Literature / Web Pages, Women, Words, Hawley (MA)

Posted by stew - Tue, Jan 6, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Rowe

Spending a few days with friends in Rowe (which by the way is one of the pleasantest towns in the State) I attended an entertainment at "Ford Hall", gotten up by F.M. Bicknell and George Ballou, assisted by the young people in the vicinity, for their own amusement and instruction and for the benefit of the ladies' sewing circle, consisting of songs, tableaux, pantomimes, etc., which as a whole was the best I ever saw, outside the walls of a first class theater.

The performance commenced with an instrumental overture, after which "Villikens and his Dinah" was acted to perfection, followed by songs, tableaux, and a dialogue by 6 young ladies, which was well acted and which received much applause. But the main feature of the evening was the pantomime entitled "The Haunted Hotel", occupying about an hour in its performance. The costumes were faultless, the acting was perfect, and the slight of hand tricks [i.e. sleight of hand tricks] and transformations which frequently occurred throughout the piece, would have been creditable to a professor of legerdemain...A Friend to Home Talent.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Hotels, Magic and Magicians, Massachusetts, Music, Show Business, Spiritualism, Women, Rowe (MA), Clothing


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