You are not logged in.   
Username: 
Password: 

Forgot password / Verify | Sign up now! | Printer Friendly

The Franklin County Publication Archive Index is constantly updated. By creating an account you can elect to receive notices when new articles are added and when people comment on the articles.

Join today!

 

Sep 25, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Florida (MA)

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Fri, Jan 9, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 16, 1875
Died

Brown, S.T., died in Florida on Aug. 5.
 

Subjects: Obituaries, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 15, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 26, 1875
Florida

Irving Richmond of Florida, who pleaded guilty of adultery last week at Pittsfield, was given 18 months in the house of correction, and Abbie L. Myers of Florida, confessing to the same crime, was sent up for 15 months.
 

Subjects: Courts, Crime, Criminals, Massachusetts, Prisons, Sex Crimes, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Fri, Dec 12, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 19, 1875
Hampshire County items

The Mill River and Williamsburg reservoir association hold a special meeting on Tues., when they will probably accept the plans of Engineer Phinehas Ball of Springfield for rebuilding the dam that burst a year ago last May. [Ball later became Mayor of Worcester].
 

Subjects: Disasters, Government, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Massachusetts, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Work, Architecture / Construction, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 6, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
Died

Phillips, Hiram E., age 20, died in Florida on June 24.
 

Subjects: Obituaries, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Dec 6, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, July 5, 1875
Monroe

June 23, a little son of William F. Tower of Monroe, aged about 17 months, died through the effects of taking what is called "elixir of opium" which is nothing more nor less than Laudanum, and which was given by the mother, in 15 or 20 drop doses once an hour, by the advice of an old Florida woman, who said it would cause the worms which were supposed to be in the child’s stomach, to have a good sleep, in an hour or so give a good dose of senna and the worms would be expelled from the child, and all would be right; but the child went to sleep never to awake, and the worms have not made their appearance yet.

The bereaved parents have the sympathy of all the neighbors, and no blame whatever is laid to them, as they were entirely ignorant of the poisonous effects of the drug they were giving. After the mother saw that her child was breathing with quick inspirations and rattling in the throat, she took it in her arms and carried it one third of a mile to the nearest neighbor for assistance, but it was too late. The last dose had been given about 11 o’clock on Wed. A.M., and about half past 2, some 3 hours after she arrived at the neighbor’s house, and everything was done by them to empty the stomach of the child, such as tickling the throat and giving emetics, etc. but to no effect.

The child never moved a muscle from half past 3 till it died, which was about 11 at night, living some 12 hours after the last dose It is a sad thing to see the child cut down in health as it were, and at an age when all the cares of the parents and affections of its brother and sister were at its very height of enjoyment. The little fellow was at play in the morning as ever and at 11 at night was a corpse. This should be a sufficient warning to every one, how they use poisons or take the advice of old women and Indian doctors, who run wild in the woods and get a great skill in medicine without the trouble of study.
 

Subjects: Child Abuse, Children, Diseases, Dreams / Sleep, Drug Abuse, Education, Family, Insects, Medical Personnel, Medicine / Hospitals, Native Americans, Obituaries, Old Age, Poisoning, Quacks and Quackery, Trees, Women, Monroe (MA), Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Dec 1, 2008

Gazette & Courier - Monday, April 12, 1875
Banks of the Deerfield to Rowe

Some of the wildest, most romantic and beautiful scenery imaginable is found on the banks of Deerfield River in Rowe and Florida. In summertime the view is majestic and grand. In the northern part of Rowe there is a large rock forming the northern slope down to the river, half a mile high and nearly as wide, where, standing on the summit with a sling, I have often pitched a stone nearly, or quite into the river. The view is sublime. Standing there, it seems as if you could almost clasp hands with an other on the opposite mountain craig on the other side. There is a piece of intervale on the opposite side, with some cultivated fields and a farm house or two. The farm houses look like baby cottages, and the men and animals and pygmies viewed from the summit on the eastern side.

A great many years ago a brother of mine with a nice hound, went hunting foxes in mid-winter. The dog started a fox and drove him to the top of the precipice. The fox, thinking to escape, bounded over the smooth rock, the dog close upon his heels. But neither could travel that steep, bare rocky surface. They just went down, rolling over each other, sometimes fox and sometimes dog ahead. My brother came on just in time to see them going down. He supposed of course the dog would be killed. He went around the ledge and made his way to the foot of the precipice. There he found his faithful dog, well and sound, standing over a dead fox.

There is also a singular rock on the east bank of the Deerfield in Rowe, called Pulpit Rock. It is a huge boulder, the western face, I should think, 100 ft. high perpendicular. "Tunket", so called, is a weird dismal canon. There is a deep place in the river in Tunket called the "good hole" where, when a boy, I used to catch some splendid strings of speckled trout, weighing from 1/4 to 3 lbs. apiece. I remember very well one hot day in summer time, seeing a big trout that would not bite, basking in a cool pool where a stream came in. I took my jack knife and tied it on to my fish pole for a spear. Taking good aim, I made a pass at him and landed a trout that weighed 3 lbs. and one ounce. I will stop here with this fish story.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Children, Eye, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fishes and Fishing, Households, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Weather, Rowe (MA), Geography, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Jul 23, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 15, 1875
(Heath) Edmund M. Vincent, member

(Heath) Edmund M. Vincent, member-elect of the Legislature from the fifth Franklin Representative District, was born in Rowe June 20, 1827. He went to Florida when but a lad of 10 years old, and lived there until 9 years since, when he removed to Heath. He has held the office of Selectman in Florida, and has served in the same capacity 2 or 3 times in Heath, where he is at the present time an incumbent of the office. He is a thorough business man, owns a thriving farm in Heath, and is a stern prohibitionist and a staunch Republican. This is his first election to the Legislature.
 

Subjects: Births, Businesspeople, Children, Elections, Emigration and Immigration, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Government, Politics, Temperance, Heath (MA), Rowe (MA), Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Jul 3, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, February 15, 1875
(Florida) Now that the Hoosac tunnel stages have been taken off, the Florida people want to know how they are going to get their mnail. For the present it will be left at the North Adams and Hoosac t

(Florida) Now that the Hoosac tunnel stages have been taken off, the Florida people want to know how they are going to get their mnail. For the present it will be left at the North Adams and Hoosac tunnel post offices, whence it will be carried by any reliable person who happens to call for it.
 

Subjects: Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Mail, Transportation, Berkshire County (MA), Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Tue, Feb 21, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 25, 1875
(Hoosac Tunnel) The diphtheria first made its appearance at the Hoosac Tunnel station about 5 weeks ago, in the family of Francis Kingsley, three of his children, one girl and two boys, being taken w

(Hoosac Tunnel) The diphtheria first made its appearance at the Hoosac Tunnel station about 5 weeks ago, in the family of Francis Kingsley, three of his children, one girl and two boys, being taken with it at nearly the same time, and the youngest, a boy of 8, dying after a day’s sickness. Mrs. Kingsley’s sister, Mrs. Lord, who came to care for the sick, was taken with the disease and died in a short time. A sister-in-law of Mrs. Lord, who came to nurse her sister, was also stricken with the plague and taken to Readsboro, where she died, as did a sister of hers there. About two weeks ago, Lydia Kingsley and Maggie Kiley, both employed at the Hoosac Tunnel House, were taken with the disease, but have recovered. A.D. Tower, proprietor of the house and town clerk of Florida, was himself attacked, with a little son of 18 months, and they are in a critical condition. Fred Martin, a boarder at the hotel, died on Sun., after a sickness of 3 days. A 10 year old daughter of John Blue, foreman for the Shanleys, is also very sick.
 

Subjects: Children, Diseases, Family, Government, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Hotels, Medical Personnel, Obituaries, Women, Work, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 30, 2006

Gazette & Courier - Monday, January 18, 1875
Greenfield Farmers Club

Greenfield Farmers Club - Notwithstanding the extremely cold weather, the club met Jan. 11, at the house of John S. Newton. After some delay the meeting was called to order and the report of the last meeting read and accepted. The Secretary also read a letter from the Executive Committee for the Fair to be held in Horticultural Hall, Boston, Feb. 22 to March 2 for "Our Dumb Animals", inviting all members of the club to contribute such articles from the products of their farms as they felt disposed. The President requested all those who had nay articles to contribute to leave them with the Secretary, who would see that they were duly forwarded. The debate upopn the question, Resolved, that the interests of this Commonwealth would be best promoted, by the repeal of the present prohibitory law, was opened by H. Billings, A.K. Warner and F.E. Martin in the affirmative, and by J. Johnson, H. Potter and W.S. Kimball in the negative. James Long thought that the law itself was correct, but that the trouble was in enforcing it. After quite a lively debate of over an hour, a vote was taken on the merits of the question, by the house, which resulted in favor of the negative, two to one. After partaking heartily of the abundance of cider and apples, brought forward, and enjoying a social chat in the "other room" with the ladies, the club adjourned to meet Jan. 25 at 7 o’clock, with F.E. Martin to discuss the best way to educate young men as farmers. To open debate, E. Barney, E. G. Ames, P.D. Martindale and C.O. Nash. L.O.Hawks, Secretary.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Beverages, Boston (MA), Charity, Clubs, Education, Fairs, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Greenfield (MA), Households, Law and Lawyers, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Temperance, Weather, Women, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Jun 4, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 30, 1874
[Very unclear

[Very unclear- This is the obituary notice for 3 of Miner Tower’s children, who died in Florida in Nov.].
 

Subjects: Children, Obituaries, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Fri, Jun 3, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 30, 1874
(Florida) A locality known as Wiley's settlement on Florida mountain, in the town of Florida, is terribly scourged with diphtheria. In the family of Miner Tower 5 children have been sick with the di

(Florida) A locality known as Wiley’s settlement on Florida mountain, in the town of Florida, is terribly scourged with diphtheria. In the family of Miner Tower 5 children have been sick with the disease, 3 of whom have died.
 

Subjects: Children, Diseases, Family, Obituaries, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 13, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
(Zoar) We have a very good select school, taught by Miss Minnie E. Peck of Rowe. It closes next week.

(Zoar) We have a very good select school, taught by Miss Minnie E. Peck of Rowe. It closes next week.
 

Subjects: Education, Women, Work, Rowe (MA), Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 13, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
(Zoar) Elliot Negus has procured a planing machine and put into his saw mill.

(Zoar) Elliot Negus has procured a planing machine and put into his saw mill.
 

Subjects: Business Enterprises, Trees, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 13, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
(Zoar) A,W, King and Bros. have erected a very nice mill on Pelham Brook, almost one half mile from Zoar Depot, on the site where the mill

(Zoar) A,W, King and Bros. have erected a very nice mill on http://www.deerfieldriver.org/recreation.html Pelham Brook , almost one half mile from Zoar Depot, on the site where the mill was burned several years ago. They are prepared not only to saw timber and shingles to order, but have large orders for boards and handles for cattle cars, which they intend to work on the coming winter, in addition to their other business. They are preparing for a grist mill, to be put in by another company.
 

Subjects: Animals / Reptiles, Business Enterprises, Charlemont (MA), Family, Food, Trains, Trees, Work, Architecture / Construction, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 13, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
(Zoar) S.W. King and W. Blodgett have built cellars, and are preparing to build new residences this fall and winter. David Rice, formerly of Florida, has built and nearly completed a fine two story h

(Zoar) S.W. King and W. Blodgett have built cellars, and are preparing to build new residences this fall and winter. David Rice, formerly of Florida, has built and nearly completed a fine two story house with barn and shed, situated near the red school house. B.B. Bryant has also a neat story and a half cottage. These are both so nearly completed that the families are occupying them.
 

Subjects: Education, Emigration and Immigration, Households, Architecture / Construction, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Mar 13, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 23, 1874
(Zoar) Munson & Co. are pushing the work on the railroad and have commenced laying the steel track near the tunnel depot, and probably will keep it graded so as to continue laying track, as the steam

(Zoar) Munson & Co. are pushing the work on the railroad and have commenced laying the steel track near the tunnel depot, and probably will keep it graded so as to continue laying track, as the steam shovel and dump cars make quick work, running day and night; so we hope to see the curves straightened and the road much improved soon. One man, while at work near the derrick in Zoar, had his eye badly injured by a hook slipping from a rock and striking it. The railroad bridge near the tunnel is found to be defective, and they are making repairs. The large no. of foreigners now employed on the railroad are causing some trouble to the inhabitants, by their drinking and depredations, tools, etc. being taken. Foster King’s clothes line was robbed Mon. night, of some of the most valuable articles, which caused a hurrying to the lines Tues. morning, by the people along the lines of the railroad, to see if their clothes were safe.
 

Subjects: Accidents, Business Enterprises, Crime, Criminals, Drunkenness, Eye, Fashion, Racism, Robbers and Outlaws, Trains, Work, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 28, 2005

Gazette & Courier - Monday, November 16, 1874
Tower, Melvin M., age 12, died on Nov. 9; Tower, Luther I., age 6, died on Nov. 9; Tower, Walter C., age 1, died on Nov. 9; all children of Miner S. Tower and Lauretta Tower, died in Florida on Nov.

Tower, Melvin M., age 12, died on Nov. 9; Tower, Luther I., age 6, died on Nov. 9; Tower, Walter C., age 1, died on Nov. 9; all children of Miner S. Tower and Lauretta Tower, died in Florida on Nov. 5.
 

Subjects: Children, Diseases, Family, Obituaries, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 26, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, October 5, 1874
The Deerfield Valley Agricultural Fair Tues. The 4th exhibition of the Deerfield Valley Agricultural Society commenced on Tues. at Charlemont, under rather unfavorable circumstances. The heavy mists

The Deerfield Valley Agricultural Fair Tues. The 4th exhibition of the Deerfield Valley Agricultural Society commenced on Tues. at Charlemont, under rather unfavorable circumstances. The heavy mists that hung about the summits of Mt. Peak, Bald and Institute, instead of rolling up and away as they should have done, thickened and darkened, until there was a slight spattering of rain drops upon the forest foliage. The good people that dwell among the hills of the region, who have been anxiously looking and hoping for promises of a brighter day, felt their hopes sink at these forebodings of doubtful weather, and of course many gave up their anticipated holiday and set about their accustomed duties. But yet there were coquettish glimpses of blue sky; and by 10 o'clock the grounds of the Society were liberally sprinkled by the sturdy farmers of the Pocumtuck Valley, and their cousins from the elevations of Florida and Savoy, while the good dames and daughters showed their disregard of soiled dresses and ruined hats, and turned out in goodly numbers. This is truly the paradise of oyster booths, for the white tents of the enterprising proprietors of these establishments were pitched in long rows, like those of an encamped army. A "burnt cork" performance was soon in full blast, and the revolving horses, propelled to the tune of a grinding hand organ, found juvenile riders in waiting, and the improvised dancing hall, with cotton canvas to protect the Terpsichoran fellows and lasses who were going through " http://burgessa.home...nceInst03-01-04.html eight hands round " and "balance all" was crowded to its fullest capacity, and all the sights and sounds of the most approved Cattle Show were soon in lively operation. There is no place in the Commonwealth where a Cattle Show,, and all that should belong to it, is better appreciated than here in Western Franklin...But the article of all others deserving praise was Mrs. C.P.C. Miner's wreath. It was made of 100 different grains and seeds in their natural color, formed into delicate blossoms and foliage, while beautiful little birds and insects were sporting among the flowers. Some idea of the amount of labor and patience required for the construction of the wreath is formed when we are told that a single lily, made principally, by the way, of rice, took the lady a whole day. The same lady, who is a newcomer in Charlemont, is evidently quite an architect. She had on exhibition a little cottage made of perforated paper that was a model of neat proportions and workmanlike skills...Mrs. Miner too, had on exhibition an oil painting and a crayon sketch that were worthy of merit, while she contributed articles in other departments. The whole of this region abounds in antiquities, and relics of ancient days always form an interesting feature of the Fair. Among these souvenirs of bygone days we noticed a pewter teapot which contained the favorite beverage of our grandmothers 217 years ago; accompanying that was an extensive array of pewter ware, an old tinder box, etc., now in the possession of G.F. Mitchell of Shelburne Falls. There was a dress too, which was the "go to meeting" gown of some good lady 95 years ago. It was nothing but calico and yet we are told that it cost $1.50 a yard. It was exhibited by Mrs. Henry White of Hawley. We are shown here a diminutive teaspoon 100 years old, and Harvey Polly of Savoy exhibited a bible which was printed in 1680. Miss H.N. Marshal of Charlemont, whose "trailing arbutus" was an attraction of last year's fair, contributed this year a painting in oil colors of "Golden Rod", very truthful and pretty! There was also a drawing of Col. Leavitt's residence in East Charlemont. A beautiful worsted wreath was made by Nettie Thayer of East Charlemont...Our attention was called particularly to the http://www.bookjackets.com/howard/logcabin.htm "log cabin" bedquilt made by Mrs. A.A. Hicks of Monroe, and another by little Millie Sears, and the beautiful rugs by Mrs. Furnace of Charlemont...showed to the ladies of the fair his Eureka Washing Machine, and the method of its operation. It certainly has the appearance of being a good thing, and the saver of a vast amount of disagreeable labor. With the drudgery of washing day left out of the week's calendar, a woman's life should be happy. And with the washing machines should be classed the sewing machines. If there is a family somewhere in the Pocumtuck Valley without one, they should not, if able, postpone the purchase longer. W.G. Stewart of Greenfield exhibited the Singer, one of the best machines yet invented, and in the same class should be reckoned the Florence, for which W.D. Chandler is the agent. J.H. Lamb of Greenfield was present too, with one of his fine toned organs, and prepared to receive orders for any of the numerous instruments for which he has the agency. Rev. Mr. Moors' address - After dinner, which was served by W.C. Fuller [probably William C. Fuller] of Hawley, in the basement of the exhibition building, the South Deerfield Band in attendance, summoned the multitude to the hill side where the speaker's stand is erected...Rev. J.F. Moors of Greenfield was introduced to his audience. His address, which was upon the New England farm house as we find it today, was a plain, practical talk...He was born upon a farm, and a large portion of his life was spent with the farming classes...He turned his attention to the farm house. Women and children spend nearly all of their time indoors, and men more than half. The air we breathe and the food we eat depend upon the house, which has important relations to health and refinement. He spoke of the prevailing fashion in our rural towns of painting the houses white and blinds green. It is the New England ideal of neatness and beauty. But the speaker thought it was bad taste, and gave one or two rules that might aid one in selecting a color for his dwelling. In turning up a stone or turf, the color of the soil might suggest the shade desirable for the house to be built upon it. Where houses are much exposed the paint should be dark, but if screened and shaded by foliage it should be light. Blinds look very well, but they exclude light and air. There were houses that stood out alone, bare and barren, and others so much shaded by trees that they were dark and unhealthy. The average farm house was neat and tidy in appearance, but frequently when you pass around to the back yard you find everything in slovenly disorder; and these slovenly habits have a serious effect upon the tastes and morals of the farmer and his family. He knew no reason why neatness and good order should not be demanded as well out of the house as in it. Out buildings were inconvenient and filthy. The air is filled with smells from pig stys, privies and sink drains, having an important bearing upon the health and comfort of the family. In the http://digital.libra...an/wide/wide-15.html chip yard , the rotten wood is allowed to corrupt the air. The farmer experiments with patent fertilizers when the material he needs is allowed to waste itself upon the air around his house. By throwing this decaying matter into his pig sty , he would increase the amount of manure and absorb the disagreeable effluvia. The privy, the speaker termed a disgrace to our civilization, and if it was to mark our progress, then we should rank far back with the savages and barbarians. From them can be traced the foulest poisons and the seeds of disease. Typhoid fever, which in the number of its victims ranked next to consumption, was more prevalent among our farming classes than in the cities, and the secret cause of the disease was the poisonous gases from the farmer's back yard. The sink drain was a mosquito manufactory, and these pests serve as scavengers and are really disguised blessings [I'd say this idea is wrong]. He would not hesitate to say that not one in 20 of the farms of this community were in healthy condition. Those fatal diseases, typhoid fever and dysentery are frequently traceable to the well which is located in the same back yard, in close proximity to the privy, the sink drain and the pig sty, and the water is charged with poison, not detected by the senses, but breeding disease to those who drink it. More than 3/4 of the wells of our farm houses are within 60 ft. of these corrupting localities. Other complaints, particularly the prevailing diseases of the women, are traced to these local causes. He objected to the use of ice water or the excessive use of coffee and tea. We should be sure that we get fresh, pure water from wells or springs, and see to it that our neighbors are not pouring these poisons into our wells. The speaker said that a farmer's front door was a useless appendage and never required except at weddings or funerals. He would have the house so arranged that it might be dispensed with. The kitchen is always neat and tidy, but rarely does the cellar bear inspection...[lots more]
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Archaeology, Art, Beverages, Birds, Business Enterprises, Charlemont (MA), Children, Cutlery, Dance, Deerfield (MA), Diseases, Fairs, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fashion, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Garbage, History, Horses, Households, Ice, Insects

Posted by stew - Sun, Dec 26, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 21, 1874
Eureka Washing Machine [ad has illustration of a girl with a short, to the knee dress and apron, standing beside the washing machine, which appears to be a crate on 4 legs

Eureka Washing Machine [ad has illustration of a girl with a short, to the knee dress and apron, standing beside the washing machine, which appears to be a crate on 4 legs - wooden of course] Has thousands of friends and more are being found daily. It received the first premium among many competitors at the last New England Fair. Agents wanted in every town to sell machines. Town and county rights for sale by the manufacturer. E. Carpenter & Co., Zoar, Mass. Particulars given by J.H. Sears, Greenfield, Mass.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Art, Business Enterprises, Charlemont (MA), Contests, Fashion, Greenfield (MA), Households, Law and Lawyers, New England, Prostitution, Sales, Trees, Women, Work, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Thu, Jul 8, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Wednesday, July 8, 1874
Gladding, James, age 25, died in Florida Sept. 4.

Gladding, James, age 25, died in Florida Sept. 4.
 

Subjects: Obituaries, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Thu, Jun 10, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 7, 1874
Thatcher, Sylvia E., age 14, daughter of E.W. Thatcher and Sarah Thatcher, died in Florida on Aug. 23.

Thatcher, Sylvia E., age 14, daughter of E.W. Thatcher and Sarah Thatcher, died in Florida on Aug. 23.
 

Subjects: Obituaries, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Apr 10, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 17, 1874
(Greenfield) William Farren, a brother of B.N. Farren, and well known to many of our citizens, was fatally injured, while engaged in blasting for a tunnel in Newton Center. He was taken to the Massac

(Greenfield) William Farren, a brother of B.N. Farren, and well known to many of our citizens, was fatally injured, while engaged in blasting for a tunnel in Newton Center. He was taken to the Massachusetts General Hospital and there died on Tues., and interred in the Green River Cemetery. Mr. F. was employed under Haupt [ http://www.famousamericans.net/hermanhaupt/ Herman Haupt ] on the Tunnel, and then worked with his brother there and on the Troy and Greenfield Railroad. For some 3 years he resided at Turners Falls, and was engaged in much of the work there for the Turners Falls Co., and the building of the manufacturing establishments. His wife was a Miss Payne of Zoar and he leaves two children.
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Business Enterprises, Cemeteries, Children, Family, Greenfield (MA), Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Massachusetts, Medicine / Hospitals, Montague (MA), Obituaries, Turners Falls (MA), Women, Work, Architecture / Construction, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Thu, Apr 8, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 10, 1874
Tower, Elva, age 5, daughter of S.T. Tower and L.M. Tower, died in Florida on July 29.

Tower, Elva, age 5, daughter of S.T. Tower and L.M. Tower, died in Florida on July 29.
 

Subjects: Obituaries, Florida (MA)

Posted by stew - Mon, Mar 29, 2004

Gazette & Courier - Monday, August 10, 1874
Frost on Florida Mountain

Frost on Florida Mountain - Tues. morning, cutting the cucumber vines and other plants.
 

Subjects: Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Weather, Florida (MA)


Powered by manager.webworksserver.com