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Apr 13, 2021
Franklin County (MA) News Archive
The Franklin County Publication Archive Index

To search for a particular subject term, click on the highlighted link containing that term at the bottom of the article. For example, if you are seeking more articles about animals, click on the highlighted link which says Animals/Reptiles/Amphibians.

Article Archives: Articles: Amusements

Showing 25

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Silver wedding

Silver wedding - Whoever originated the modern idea of celebrating wedding annniversaries deserves much credit, as all will testify who were present at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. F.G. Davis of Sadawga,Vt. Aug. 25, it being the 25th anniversary of their wedding day. The worthy couple were surprised at dinner by the arrival of friends from Brattleboro, and soon after appeared in a body, 15 other teams, bringing neighbors, relatives and friends to the number of 40 or more, who unceremoniously took possession of the old house, and after greeting and hand shaking, proceeded to enjoy themselves in the most approved style, and as man (and woman as well) is a social being, they succeeded admirably.

Late in the day Mrs. Davis was again surprised by the arrival of sisters and friends from Bennington and White Creek, New York, who had crossed the mountain that day to assist in the celebration.Meanwhile sundry boxes and baskets appeared from their hiding places and their contents loaded the dining tables with the many good things which our mountain ladies know so well how to produce.

The tables were also beautifully decorted with flowers and two elegant vases, the gift of one of the guests, added much to their tasteful appearance. After refreshments Rev. N.E. Jenkins, in a few timely remarks, addressed the bride and groom, and in behalf of the donors presented a few articles of silver - a caster, cake basket, napkin rings, spoons and forks and some pieces of statuary.

Mr. Davis responded briefly, but to the point, referring to the same day 25 years ago. Though a shade of sadness marked the occasion, on account of the recent death of the aged father of the groom, the day was one long to be remembered by those present. Four generations of the family were present - the mother of the groom, his children, and one grandchild.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Children, Cutlery, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Food, Furniture, Horses, Households, Marriage and Elopement, Obituaries, Old Age, Parties, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, Statues, Transportation, Vermont, Women, Jewelry / Gold / Silver / Treasure

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The Brass Band makes a very fine appearance in their new uniform. They render their hearty thanks to their generous friends for their assistance.


 

Subjects: Amusements, Charity, Music, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Clothing

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - The ladies of the Baptist Society will give us an oyster and pound party at the vestry on Wed. eve. Many novel and interesting entertainments will be introduced. All members of the Society will each carry a pound of something which will be sold at auction. Let everybody attend.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Religion, Sales, Vendors and Purchasers, Women

Posted by stew - Fri, Feb 12, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Northfield

Northfield - Mr. Moody has consented to lecture before the conference at their meeting in Northfield upon the Holy Spirit. The Northfield people [?] to do as much as possible toward the entertainment of all who come, but it is possible that, because of Moody's presence, there may come more than they can accommodate...People should come prepared with lunch baskets, etc.


 

Subjects: Amusements, Food, Northfield (MA), Religion

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Whately

Whately - Captain Seth Bardwell and wife celebrated their golden wedding Wed., with about 100 of their immediate family friends. Brief addresses of congratulation were made by their pastor, Rev. J.W. Lane and others. A poem by Mrs. J.W. Lane was read, and in the eve. a serenade was given by the choir of the Congregational Church. The Haydenville Band also enlivened the festivities. Some 3 years ago Spencer Bardwell- brother of Capt. Seth celebrated his golden wedding, and within the coming year a sister living at Worcester will celebrate hers.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Family, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Marriage and Elopement, Massachusetts, Music, Old Age, Parties, Poetry, Religion, Whately (MA), Women

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Millers Falls

Millers Falls - The village is justly proud of its band. It has been organized about a year, and consists of 20 pieces, under the instruction of William L. Day of Greenfield. We doubt if ever a musical organization that has had so little practice can show greater proficiency. The members are determined to perfect themselves, and if they keep up the way they have commenced, Millers Falls will have one of the "crack" bands of Western Massachusetts. [Prophetic? You decide ;-)]
 

Subjects: Amusements, Greenfield (MA), Massachusetts, Millers Falls (MA), Montague (MA), Music, Prophecies, Words

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Deerfield

The season has been an unusually lively one on Deerfield Street...the many strangers with the young people of the village keeping up a round of pleasures. But summer boarders are now taking their departure, and we shall soon settle down to our customary ways.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Children, Deerfield (MA), Roads, Vacations

Posted by stew - Wed, Feb 10, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items



Greenfield - Frank Lansing Grinnell, who met his death by a sad and singular accident at Bridgeport, CT, was a son of George B. Grinnell of New York, and a grandson of Hon. George Grinnell of this town. He had just graduated at Yale and was about entering into business. A most exemplary young man, and fond of outdoor exercise and amusements, including the game of baseball in which he was skilled.

At the time of the accident, he was at Bridgeport to take part in a match game. Previous, while endeavoring to catch a flying ball, he stepped backward, unawares, into the line of 2 young men who were passing a ball, before they perceived it. The ball was the hardest on the ground, and thrown by the most powerful pitcher of the club, and struck young Grinnell on the back of the head, just at the base of the skull.

He fell instantly, and was soon after taken to the house of Hon. W.D. Bishop, where he received every attention possible. His friends arrived as soon as telegraph and steam could bring them. He remained unconscious until Friday, when he seemed to recognize them, and hope revived among his friends; but he sunk away and died on Saturday eve.

He was much beloved by his classmates and others in college, and only 2 weeks ago spent several days with his grandparents, where he met many acquaintances who mourn his early death.

[Additional information can be found in the
1875-1876 Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University online].
 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Accidents, Amusements, Businesspeople, Connecticut, Education, Family, Greenfield (MA), Households, Literature / Web Pages, Obituaries, Sports, Telegraphs / Telephones, Transportation

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 31, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
Greenfield items

Greenfield - See Richardson's advertisement for oysters, ice creams, and all the delicacies you want. Give him a call. Parties supplied with all refreshments needed.
 

Subjects: Advertising, Amusements, Business Enterprises, Businesspeople, Fishes and Fishing, Food, Greenfield (MA), Parties

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Caledonians at Lake Pleasant



There was not the anticipated crowd at the Tournament of the Springfield Caledonian Society at Lake Pleasant on Wed. Special trains were run up from the South and from the east on the Fitchburg road, but many of the cars were nearly empty. The lake has had its attractions for the season, and people are now holding on to the spare coppers for the needs of approaching winter.

But few of the Caledonians were in full costume, yet the advertised programme was carried out, and the day’s sports were by no means a fizzle. The Fitchburg Band and Russell’s orchestra furnished the music, and the following were the successful winners in the principle athletic feats:

In the three-legged race, in which the competitors race in pairs with a leg of each tied to that of his comrade, Richard Harvey of Easthampton and Paul Fitzgerald of Shelburne Falls took the first prize of $6, and Hutchins and Wilson took the second of $3.

In the Hop, Skip and Jump contest, Thomas O’Donald of Northampton proved the best man, clearing 38 feet, and took the first prize of $5; and P. Sullivan of Ftichburg, who cleared 37 1/2 ft. took the 2nd prize of $2."Putting heavy stone" was a trial of strength of throwing a 16 lb. iron ball; John Purcell of Florence threw it 41 1/2 ft.and won the 1st prize of $6; Patrick Purcell of Florence, who threw it 31 ft. 4 inches, had the 2nd prize of $3.



Dancing the Highland Fling in costume was an interesting feature,George Bothwick of Boston taking the 1st prize of $6, and W.G.Smith of Boston the 2nd of $3. Tossing the caber ( a 12 ft. stick of lumber) was won by John Purcell who threw it 30 ft. 1 inch, receiving $5, and E.R. McCormick of Florence came next, and received $3.



In vaulting with a pole, Richard Harvey cleared a perpendicular jump of 8 ft. 7 inches and took the 1st prize of $5, and P. Purcell took the 2nd of $3. In the mile foot race, P. Sullivan of Fitchburg made the best time and took the 1st prize of $10, and E. Wilson was 2nd, and took the prize of $5.

There was a hurdle race, which was quite an exciting affair; R. Harvey took the 1st money, $6, and __ Hitchcock, the 2nd, $3. There were 4 contestants in the swimming match. The course was from the gent’s bath house to the landing. F.M.Sweeney of Worcester took the 1st prize of $15, and G.H. Crocker of Fitchburg the 2nd, of $10.



The single scull race was the great event of the day. There were 4 entries, and the course was the length of the lake and back. It was a close and exciting contest. John E. Brown of Worcester won the race and the 1st money, $40; Daniel McSweeney of Fitchburg came in 2nd, for $30; Jerry Callahan of Springfield came in 3rd and received $15.

Some boys caused no little sport in the tub race, where they were frequently capsized. The games were continued until the departure of the trains at night.


 

Subjects: Accidents, Amusements, Boston (MA), Children, Clubs, Contests, Dance, Economics, Hampshire / Hampden Counties, Heritage Activities, Lake Pleasant (MA), Massachusetts, Montague (MA), Music, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Sports, Trains, Transportation, Trees, Weather, Clothing

Posted by stew - Sun, Jan 24, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Bloody Brook Bi-Centennial

A memorable celebration - The 200th anniversary of the massacre of Captain Thomas Lathrop and the "Flower of Essex"

http://www.memorialh.../lesson5/bloody.html

by the Indians of Bloody Brook, occurred on Sat. the 18th, and was celebrated by services of commemoration at S. Deerfield on Fri. the 17th. Held in connection with the celebration was the Sixth Annual Field meeting of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association...We doubt if ever South Deerfield witnessed such an influx of strangers as thronged to her beautiful streets on this pleasant morning. From a radius of many miles they came...

(For a complete account of the event, please see p. 283+ of Google Books 'History and proceedings of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association'].

[The account itself takes up 4 long columns in the paper, so please take advantage of the Google Books account!]
 

Subjects: Amusements, Clubs, Deerfield (MA), Food, Heritage Activities, History, Literature / Web Pages, Massachusetts, Native Americans, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Roads, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
The Coleraine Murder

The Coleraine Murder - As briefly stated in our last issue, Daniel Dwight, supposed to be one of the murderers of Joseph R. Farnsworth, was arrested Sat. night at the door of his father’s house on Catamount Hill, Coleraine, where he had come 5 days after the murder. There were 6 men, under Deputy Sheriff John Gould, stationed around the house, and between 10 and 11 o’clock, they saw a man coming up the road, which proved to be young Dwight.

They allowed him to approach near the house, when a signal was given, and they stepped from their hiding places. Dwight ran around the house in the direction of the barn, but he was then surrounded and forced to surrender. When taken into the house before his father, he fainted.

Dwight was confined in the lock-up at Shelburne Falls, and on Mon., Trial Justice Brainard of Greenfield held a court at the office of H.M.Puffer, Esq., and had the young man brought before him. A large gathering of people were in attendance, and among them Dwight’s wife, father and mother.

He pleaded not guilty, and the magistrate, without having a hearing of evidence, arraigned him on the charge of murder and continued the case to Mon. the 17th. Officers Swan and Gould then brought the prisoner to Greenfield,where he is now confined in jail. Dwight appears quite calm and is not disposed to talk much about the affair. He accounts for his absence and his whereabouts during the 4 days as follows:

"I had some trouble with my wife on Tues. aft., which had ended by my saying I was going off, and her replying that she hoped I would, and what was more, that I would stay away. She then started to go to father’s house, which is only a short distance from mine, and I started for a pasture where some of father’s cattle were grazing.

On the way I met Herbert Davenport, and together we went to Farnsworth’s house, and afterward went down the lane to the road leading to Shelburne Falls. Herbert wanted a cane, so we stopped and cut one, I bending the tree over while he cut it; but he did not carry it long before he threw it away.

From there we went through the fields directly to my house, where I changed my clothes and gave a suit to Herbert, as his were all patched and dirty. We left home about 5 o’clock, and went down the mountain to Heath, and then through Hartwellville down to North Adams, getting there on Wed. aft.

We walked all Tues. night.Wed. night we slept on the hills near North Adams, and on Thurs. morning, after staying a while in North Adams, we walked to Pownal on the railroad track. At Pownal we got on board a train which was returning with the firemen from the muster at North Adams that day.

At Petersburg Junction Herbert got left with some Salem, N.Y. firemen, because the train started so quick, and I could not get off, it was going so fast. That night I stopped at Greenwich, N.Y. and registered my name in the hotel book in full - Daniel J. Dwight, Coleraine, Mass. I remained there that night, but had nothing to eat, as I only had money enough to pay for my lodging.

[For more information on this area, see the Internet Archive’s "Williamstown, the Berkshire Hills, and thereabout"]

The next day I walked to Troy. I did not remain there long because I was hungry and sick, and thought I would go right home and go to work for father, and let my wife do as she chose. Coming back I got a ride part of the way on a freight train, and got to N. Adams Sat. aft.,and walked to central shaft in the tunnel, and from there I rode to the east end on the workmen’s train and walked to Zoar, where they let me ride on a hand car to Charlemont. From there I rode with a Mr.Wells as far as his house, and then went across the fields home".



A portion of Dwight’s story has proved to be true. Bradley Davenport and Wesley Woodard, sent to Petersburg Junction, sent back that two men answering the description of Dwight and Davenport had been there. At Greenwich, N.Y., Dwight’s name was found registered in full, as he had said, and there is nothing to show that Davenport was with him at the time.

The Davenport boy arrested - Search was continued for Davenport and finally he was tracked to Williamstown, and Thurs. aft. was found there by a Mr. White. He made no efforts to escape, but on the other hand seemed glad to give himself up.

He was brought through the tunnel to Shelburne Falls Fri. morning, and Trial Justice Brainard of Greenfield held a preliminary trial, arraigned him for murder, and continued the trial until the 27th. The Davenport boy’s narrative is substantially the same as that given by Dwight, but he does not deny that they killed Farnsworth.

He says their only object was to obtain money, that he had no enmity or ill will towards the murdered man. He and Dwight had made up their minds to go West and hoped to get enough money from Farnsworth to pay their expenses, but he says they only got about $4.

There were 2 sticks cut, he says, a walnut and a maple. It was with the latter that Farnsworth was knocked down. He says that he did not do the striking, though he was there. After he was left at Petersburg Junction, he wandered from place to place, working for something to eat when he could get employment, and was endeavoring to get back home.

Davenport is not of ordinary intelligence. He was dull at school, and has since been lazy and shiftless. Want of mental responsibility will be entered as a plea in his behalf. His mother says that he has always been a "strange boy". She has another son and a daughter who are bright, active and industrious.

Davenport was brought to Greenfield and lodged in jail on Fri. by Deputy Sheriff Swan. Both boys, who are allowed to be together when not locked in their cells, do not appear to be cast down or afflicted much with remorse. They will be brought before the Grand Jury at the November Court and if bills are found against them the trial will be before a special session of the Supreme Court.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Charlemont (MA), Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Courts, Crime, Criminals, Diseases, Economics, Education, Family, Farmers & Farming / Flowers, Fires, Food, Greenfield (MA), Handicapped, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Hotels, Households, Juvenile Delinquents, Marriage and Elopement, Missing Persons, Murder, Names, Police

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

A singular accident occurred at Amesbury on Wed. morning. A son of Mr. McHugues took up an ax, and while swinging it about his head in imitation of an Indian, the ax separated from the handle and buried itself in the shoulder of his sister, who stood a short distance from him. A fearful wound was inflicted, but fortunately no cords or arteries were severed. It was considered a very narrow escape from a fatal result.


 

Subjects: Accident Victims, Amusements, Children, Family, Massachusetts, Native Americans, Toys, War / Weaponry

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week



Moses Hull of Boston and a crowd of other lunatics, profaned the Sabbath and the beautiful Lake Walden at Concord on the 12th by a noisy meeting, advocating free love and Spiritualism, and resolved "that our present system of marriage is slavery, and that, considering that idiocy, insanity, prostitution, adultery, rape, drunkenness and murder are its legitimate fruits, it is the duty of every lover of humanity to protest against it".

[See the article on Moses Hull in Wikipedia].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Boston (MA), Crime, Criminals, Drunkenness, Insanity, Marriage and Elopement, Massachusetts, Murder, Prostitution, Rape, Religion, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Seduction, Sex Crimes, Spiritualism, Wife Abuse, Women

Posted by stew - Mon, Jan 18, 2010

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
News of the week

Still another aeronaut has had a narrow escape. He made an ascension at Augusta, Ky. recently, and the balloon fell into the river, he became entangled in the ropes, and was rescued by a passing boat just as he was sinking for the third time.
 

Subjects: Accidents, Amusements, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Sports, Transportation, Stunt performers, Water

Posted by stew - Mon, Feb 23, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 20, 1875
From Turin to Florence

From Turin to Florence, by P. Thorne (Mrs. Fayette Smith) [long article].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Italians, Vacations, Women

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Catamount Hill Reunion



Catamount Hill Reunion - The sun never shone upon a jollier band than was gathered on Catamount HiIl at the Reunion on Sept. 1. The day was all that could be expected, and everyone seemed to partake of its joyousness. The company from Adams, together with a delegation from the west, preluded the occasion by riding though the Hoosac Tunnel and viewing the wonderful work thereof.

Then on up the mountain they went, stopping ever and anon to hear an old time story, from Paul, Henry, or Chauncey, and maybe from the Dr., to say nothing of the Professor from the Hub. At the old school house they halted, and the story of whipping out the muster was triumphantly related.

When they reached the picnic ground, such a hurra of welcome as came from the Catamount Hill boys, one could hardly imagine, but it made the old hills ring, and the rocks their silence seemed to break, for "Uncle Bill’s" enthusiasm was fearfully contagious.

But to the programme first, reading of the 90th psalm from Mr. Benjamin Farley’s old family Bible; then prayer from one of the old time residents, after which "Coronation" was sung and the chronological history read by Dr. A.. Davenport (a copy of which appears in this paper).

Family histories were also read by Miss Emma Farley and Miss Nellie Ives beautifully worded and well worthy of print would space be allotted. "The Old Oaken Bucket" with appropriate remarks by Mr. David Cary were listened to with interest.

http://www.scituateh...tes_oakenbucket.html

Then too, the picnic part of the programme must not escape mention, which was basket in every sense of the word - a group here, another here, and so all around the rocks and ledges were seated, the happy families partaking of the good things brought to sustain the inner man.

And last, but not least, the miscellaneous, of which there is not room to speak in detail; reminiscences of bygone years.

"And jokes that cracked a bit (etc.)
One did, perchance,call forth the tears
The other shouts and cheers (etc.)"

Then there were notes from C.J. Davenport and Levi Davenport; poems from "Q in the Corner"; and "Mrs. M.D."; speeches from many, etc. too numerous to mention. In short, many appropriate and spicy things were said; one was "Once I was young, but now I am old; never have I seen a Catamounter forsaken or his seed begging bread". [Kind of ironic considering the murder that would take place there a week later]. Estimated number present, 700.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Animals / Reptiles, Astronomy, Boston (MA), Charity, Coleraine [now Colrain] (MA), Education, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Food, History, Hoosac Tunnel (MA), Jokes, Literature / Web Pages, Medical Personnel, Murder, Music, Noise, Old Age, Parties, Religion, Trains, Women, Words, Berkshire County (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - Couillard's new Hall was dedicated by the Cornet Band's ball on Fri. night.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Dance, Music, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Architecture / Construction

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - C.C. Puffer and his family from Charleston, S.C. are visiting at the residence of his father, Dr. S. Puffer. He was an earnest supporter of Governor Chamberlain, and largely instrumental in his nomination and election.

http://www.clements....ides/NP/PufferM.html
 

Subjects: Amusements, Elections, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Government, Households, Politics, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne Falls

Shelburne Falls - Thurs. morning the Niagara Company with a full number of men, well officered, accompanied by their machine, took the excursion train for North Adams to attend the fireman’s muster. They were well pleased with the exercises, but did not have a chance to play for a prize.


 

Subjects: Amusements, Contests, Fires, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA), Berkshire County (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne

Shelburne - Jack Klelogg, as they used to call him, is also here; a brother of the late Elam Kellogg. He lives in Ohio but has many friends here.

[See Google Books "The Kelloggs in the Old World and the New" by Timothy Hopkins, 1903].
 

Subjects: Amusements, Emigration and Immigration, Family, Literature / Web Pages, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sun, Feb 22, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Shelburne

Shelburne - We are pleased to see that Horace Hawks, an old former resident, who now lives in Georgetown, N.Y.,is in town visiting his friends.

http://www.rootsweb..../~nymadiso/bios3.htm
 

Subjects: Amusements, Emigration and Immigration, Shelburne and Shelburne Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Sat, Feb 21, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Turners Falls

Turners Falls - At a dance at Montague City the other night a lot of fellows pounced upon Abner Avery without provocation, and pounded him in a fearful manner. Constables Allen and Jones gathered in 5 of the fellows, and Whit. Berden, James Swing, Horatio Cutler and Lewis Buffum were each fined $8.92, while David Snow was discharged.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Courts, Crime, Criminals, Dance, Economics, Montague (MA), Police, Turners Falls (MA)

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 19, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
Hawley

Hawley - Moody Spring is having its quota of visitors this season. Several persons from abroad have taken possession of the old Hitchcock house nearby, where, undisturbed, they drink freely of these healthful waters, luxuriate in blackberries and feast on the wild scenery.
 

Subjects: Amusements, Food, Households, Rivers / Lakes / Oceans, Vacations, Hawley (MA), Water

Posted by stew - Thu, Feb 19, 2009

Gazette & Courier - Monday, September 13, 1875
An excursion



The Connecticut River Railroad has issued excursion tickets to the White Mountains and back at very low rates. They take the excursionists to the top of Mount Washington and are good from the 11th to the 21st for the upward passage and on the return to the 25th, inclusive. The price of tickets are to the Profile House and return, $9; Fabyan House, $8; Crawford House, $8.50; top of Mt. Washington $11.50. This is a favorable time of year to visit the White Mountains and the fare is very low.


 

Subjects: Amusements, Economics, Hotels, New Hampshire, Trains, Vacations


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